Category: 1a Trichocereus Species A – E

Trichocereus angelesii / Echinopsis angelesii or angelesiae

Trichocereus angelesii / Echinopsis angelesii or angelesiae

Trichocereus angelesii, also known as Echinopsis angelesii or Echinopsis angelesiae, was originally described by Friedrich Ritter as a white flowering variety of Trichocereus strigosus / Trichocereus strigonus, until Kiesling publicized it under the name Trichocereus angelesii.

Trichocereus angelesii Echinopsis angelesii angelesiae Michelle Killen

Michelle Killen

Check out two photos of Trichocereus strigonus in comparison

Trichocereus strigonus Echinopsis strigona Strigosus strigosaTrichocereus strigonus Echinopsis strigona Strigosus strigosa 2

The flower of Trichocereus angelesii

The flower of Echinopsis angelesii is white and 12-24 centimeters long. Trichocereus angelesii is a day flowering / diurnal species with clear visual similarity to Trichocereus strigonus. The spines, fruits and seeds are pretty much indistinguishable from the ones of Trichocereus strigosus, which makes it nearly impossible to identify the plant unless you find it at the original type location. Trichocereus angelesii, aka Echinopsis angelesii, usually has 14-22 ribs . In comparison to this, Trichocereus huascha has 12-15 ribs.

Trichocereus angelesii Echinopsis angelesii angelesiae Pedro 1

Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus angelesii Echinopsis angelesii angelesiae

Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus angelesii Echinopsis angelesii angelesiae

Pedro Lopez Artes

The typus location is Famatima in the provence La Rioja, what makes it likely that it is synonymous with the commercial name Trichocereus famatinensis. It is also closely related to the plant that Ritter called Trichocereus callianthus. This plant was originally sold by Ritter as FR999, which was still labeled as Trichocereus huascha back then.

Kiesling´s description gives Darwinia in Argentina as the typus location and it´s not clear whether or not those plants were actually the same.

Buy Trichocereus angelesii / Buy seeds of T. angelesii

It´s a rare species that you only get rarely, but classic Kaktus nurseries like Kakteen Haage or Uhlig Kakteen might have some of them available. If you don’t have the chance to collect them at one of the aforementioned locations, you will probably not run into it very oftenly. There are also some older plants that you can find on the commercial market, and these are usually labeled as T. huascha or Trichocereus strigonus. White flowering Trichocereus huascha might very well be a mislabeled Trichocereus angelesii.

Trichocereus angelesii Echinopsis angelesii Trout

Trichocereus angelesii Echinopsis angelesii Trout 2

Trichocereus angelesii Echinopsis angelesii Trout 4

If you enjoyed this article, also make sure to check out some of our other articles. For example the archive pages on Echinopsis macrogona, Echinopsis peruviana or Echinopsis valida.

Also join our Trichocereus Facebook group at https://facebook.com/groups/trichocereus

 

Trichocereus litoralis – Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis

Trichocereus litoralis – Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis

This beautiful Trichocereus species is definitely closely related to Trichocereus chiloensis and the current taxonomy is treating it as a variety or subspecies to it. Trichocereus litoralis always was a problematic species because there are so many intermediate forms between Trichocereus chiloensis and Trichocereus litoralis that it is extremely difficult to draw the line somewhere. While some treat it as part of Trichocereus chiloensis, some others disagree and treat it as a separate species. Personally, I think that the whole group of plants surrounding Trichocereus chiloensis is very variable and we should simply respect that plants can be related to each other and at the same time, look a little bit different. The species is also very closely related to Trichocereus skottsbergii, which I also regard as a variety of Trichocereus chiloensis/Echinopsis chiloensis.

Origin of E.litoralis:

Chile. Growing mostly around the coast line. Coquimbo

Synonyms of T.litoralis:

Echinopsis litoralis, Cereus litoralis, Trichocereus chiloensis var. litoralis, Trichocereus chilensis var. litoralis, Cereus chilensis,

The type location is in Zapallar, north of Valparaiso near the coast of Chile. The species is widely distributed all across the coast up to Los Vilos. The many radial spines are needle-like, while the middle spines are pretty strong and thick and up to 3 cm long. It has 9-28 radial spines and 3-6 middle spines.

Trichocereus chiloensis ssp. litoralis gets between 1-2 meters tall. It has a very dark green color and and a maximum diameter of 10-15 centimeters.

Ribs of Echinopsis chiloensis ssp.litoralis:

15-22, areoles approximately 1-2 centimeters apart of each other.

Flowers of Trichocereus litoralis:

Trichocereus litoralis has a white flower, which is extremely similar to the one on Trichocereus chiloensis. The flowers are up to 15 centimeters long, which is on the lower end of the scale for Trichocerei.

Fruit of E.litoralis:

Round, dark green. Up to 5 Centimeters in diameter

Where to buy seeds and cuttings of Trichocereus litoralis?

You can get some seeds of Trichocereus litoralis in my shop.

 

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 2

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 4

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 58c

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 8Pic: Richard Hipp! Thank you very much!

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 8

Have a look at this beautiful picture of Trichocereus litoralis growing along the coast line in Chile.

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 12

The flower of Trichocereus litoralis is extremely beautiful and can be used in hybrid breeding. Unfortunately, those plants take very long until they reach adulthood.

The photos below: Photos: Ármin Bindics

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 13

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 61

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 76

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 68

Photos below: Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes 77Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes (2) 2Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes (3) Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes (5)Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes (4)

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis

Ulrich Hörner

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus grandiflorus / rowleyi (Echinopsis grandiflora)

Trichocereus grandiflorus / rowleyi (Echinopsis grandiflora)

Trichocereus grandiflorus is a cactus from the genus Trichocereus. Its status is highly questionable as a correct species and the opinions are as varied as the names it carried. Joel Lodé has listed Trichocereus grandiflorus as Trichocereus rowleyi right now, while Anderson listed it as a synonym of Echinopsis huascha in his Cactus Lexicon. Please note that some people also refer to this plant as Echinopsis grandiflora, but this name is also used by Echinopsis eyriesii v. grandiflora and the older name has priority.

Synonyms of Trichocereus grandiflorus:

Lobivia grandiflora, Lobivia grandiflorus, Helianthocereus grandiflora, Helianthocereus grandiflorus, Helianthocereus huascha, Trichocereus rowleyi, Echinopsis huascha

Trichocereus grandiflorus was moved around between the genera  a lot in the past. It is genetically close to both Lobivia and Soehrensia, which is why it was sometimes included there. Friedrich et al. listed it as Echinopsis grandiflora. Anderson then listed it as a synonym to Echinopsis calochlora in his CACTUS LEXICON. Joel Lodé lists it as Trichocereus rowleyi. Schlumpberger lists it as Soehrensia grandiflora (Schlumpberger).

T.grandiflorus Flower:

The flowers of Trichocereus grandiflorus are often red and/or show various variations of red flowers. There are many hybrids, which is why the flower color is relatively unrelaible. There also are versions of flowers that are white in color and between 15-25 Centimeters in size. The tube is usually very hairy, but there are countless hybrids with all kinds of flower colors available on the open market.

Origin of Trichocereus grandiflorus:

Argentina, especially around Catamarca. The original description refers to a plant from a private collection and it is suspected that Trichocereus grandiflorus is extremely close to Trichocereus huascha and might even be part of this species.

The original description as Lobivia grandiflora came from Britton & Rose. Because of that, the plant was labeled as a Lobivia in most classic cactus literature. In addition, the title “Grandiflorus”, which roughly means “Large Flower” makes a lot of sense because most Lobivias usually have smaller flowers. The large flower size for a Lobivia shows that it is not a very normal Lobivia either. The collector Fric, who labeled it Chamaecereus giganteus (same principle because most Chamaecereus are tiny Lobivia), originally introduced the plant into the market, but since it was so different from Chamaecereus, this did not last long. Backeberg wanted to put it in his own problematic Genus Helianthocereus due to the diurnal flowers, but this flawed system was not adapted. Eventually, the plant ended up in Trichocereus, where it was until the restructuring made by Friedrich et al.

Cultivation of Trichocereus rowleyi (ex GF):

Trichocereus grandiflorus is a very hardy plant that can grow a lot during just one growing season if watered accordingly. The plant is able to tolerate some light frost but I would not recommend trying it out to the limit. I keep them at around 10° Celsius during the wintertime in a bright and well-ventilated room. I do not water them during the wintertime and only start watering again in March.

Buy Trichocereus grandiflorus / Seeds or Plants:

This plant is available every now on then on marketplace sites like Ebay or Amazon. In addition, many growers use it to produce hybrids. The Californian nursery Sacred Succulents has some colored Grandiflora hybrids and they sell seed every now an then. You can also try to make a post at our Trichocereus group at https://facebook.com/groups/trichocereus   because there are some growers there who give some away every now and then.

Trichocereus grandiflorus also shows similarities to Trichocereus schickendantzii and some even consider them close relatives. It´s sometimes difficult to keep the two apart and growers or collectors mix them up all the time. The same applies to Trichocereus huascha, which differs from Trichocereus grandiflorus through its spination.

Due to the fact that there are so many misidentified Trichocereus grandiflorus, or plants that are identified as Trichocereus huascha but are actually GF, a large part of the photos that can be seen online show something else. This whole confusion is worst with small and juvenile plants. Trichocereus grandiflorus is MULTI-Ribbed and grows columnar. Its higher rib count and the strange pupping behavior in combination with shorter spines than T. huascha and its typical pupping style at the base make it possible to identify it reliably though. The pups almost look like little balls on the base of the plant while Trichocereus schickendanzii forms large clusters that can get up to 1-2 meters wide. The problem with Trichocereus grandiflorus is that the original description was written after a collection plant, which may or may not have already been a hybrid of Trichocereus huascha.

Before we get to the pics, let me first take the time to say thank you to Prier, who donated those amazing pics. Thanks Prier!

 

Trichocereus grandiflorus / Echinopsis grandiflora T.rowleyi

Trichocereus grandiflorus / Echinopsis grandiflora T.rowleyi 2

Trichocereus grandiflorus / Echinopsis grandiflora T.rowleyi 3

Trichocereus grandiflorus / Echinopsis grandiflora T.rowleyi 5

Trichocereus grandiflorus / Echinopsis grandiflora T.rowleyi 7

Trichocereus grandiflorus / Echinopsis grandiflora T.rowleyi 8

Trichocereus grandiflorus / Echinopsis grandiflora T.rowleyi 9

Trichocereus rowleyi hybrid Trichocereus grandiflorus grandiflora

Trichocereus rowleyi hybrid – Photo credit: Jarek Tuszyński

Trichocereus rowleyi hybrid Trichocereus grandiflorus grandiflora 2

Trichocereus rowleyi hybrid – Photo credit: Jarek Tuszyński

Trichocereus rowleyi hybrid Trichocereus grandiflorus grandiflora 5

Trichocereus rowleyi hybrid – Photo credit: Jarek Tuszyński

Trichocereus rowleyi hybrid Trichocereus grandiflorus grandiflora 11

A very typical Trichocereus grandiflorus Photo Credit: Dinkum

 

Trichocereus scopulicola x Trichocereus grandiflorus Zelly hybrid Jeremy Jones

Trichocereus scopulicola x Trichocereus grandiflorus Zelly hybrid Jeremy Jones

Trichocereus grandiflorus Rowleyi Echinopsis grandiflora

A typical Trichocereus grandiflorus, labeled as Trichocereus huascha (Randy)

Trichocereus grandiflorus Rowleyi Echinopsis grandiflora

Another typical T. grandiflorus, labeled as T. huascha. Roger Kidd geograph.org.uk ,_Ashington,_

Trichocereus grandiflorus Rowleyi Echinopsis grandiflora

Another typical T. grandiflorus, labeled as T. huascha. by Daderot -_Botanischer_Garten_Freiburg

In comparison to this, here are Trichocereus huascha and Trichocereus schickendantzii:

Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha stickpen

Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha stickpen

Trichocereus huascha v. rubriflorus Echinopsis huascha

Trichocereus schickendantzii Echinopsis schickendantzii Gus 2

Trichocereus schickendantzii Echinopsis schickendantzii Gus 2

Note the differences in regards to the flower. White versions of Trichocereus grandiflorus are almost always misidentified Trichocereus schickendantzii, Trichocereus shaferi, or true hybrids involving T. huascha or T. grandiflorus that resulted in a white flower.

If you enjoyed this article, show us some love on Facebook, Instagram or join our Trichocereus newsletter.

Trichocereus huascha (Echinopsis huascha)

Trichocereus huascha (Echinopsis huascha)

Trichocereus huascha, also known as Echinopsis huascha, is an Argentinian Trichocereus species that looks very similar to Trichocereus spachianus, Trichocereus grandiflorus, Trichocereus shaferi and Trichocereus schickendantzii. However, there are important differences to distinguish them.

Trichocereus huascha has had a long history with many name changes due to its unique position between Trichocereus, Lobivia and Echinopsis. Friedrich & Rowley renamed it to Echinopsis huascha in 1974 but their actions weren´t really embraced with love.

I have some fresh seeds of Echinopsis huascha. You can get them here:

Synonyms: Lobivia huascha, Helianthocereus huascha, Trichocereus huascha, Echinopsis huascha, Soehrensia huascha, Cereus huascha, Cereus huascha variety flaviflorus, Cereus huascha var. rubriflorus, Lobivia purpureominata, Trichocereus andalgalensis, Echinopsis andalgalensis, Lobivia andalgalensis, Trichocereus grandiflorus, Echinopsis grandiflora,

Described varieties of T.huascha:

Trichocereus huascha v. robustior or robusta

Trichocereus huascha v. pecheterianus

Trichocereus huascha v. rubriflorus 

Trichocereus huascha v. auricolor 

The list of names that Trichocereus huascha already had does not fit on one page, so I will only keep the most important ones. Many varieties of this species were actually labeled Lobivia, Cereus or even Chamaecereus and it´s very difficult to differentiate the plant from similar plants like Trichocereus schickendantzii, Trichocereus spachianus or Trichocereus grandiflorus.

Echinopsis huascha usually grows in small, clumping groups that reach up to 1,1 meters in height. It usually pups abundantly and can grow upwards like a columnar cactus or creeping. The pups can get up to 5-6 centimeters in diameter and has up to 15 ribs as a mature plant. The areoles are between 1 cm and 1,5 centimeters apart from each other. There are yellow colored and needle-like spines on each areole. Trichocereus huascha has 10-12 radial spines that are up to 2 centimeters long. The flower color is absolutely variable; also because there are SO many natural and commercial hybrids. This plant is used extensively in Trichocereus hybrid culture and many hybrids that are floating around on the market cant fully be id´d because the offspring can sometimes look very different from the parental generation. The plant flowers from the apex, through the areoles and the flower color can be yellow, red or orange. You can keep it apart from plants like Trichocereus schickendantzii by the color of the flower (Schickendantzii has white flowers) and the thinner growth of E. huascha. The flowers are 6-8 centimeters in diameter and the species is usually dayflowering! They also are sometimes self-sterile, while other forms are self-fertile. You usually need two plants to get seed, but T.huascha hybridizes so easily in nature that there are some plants that form fruit without being pollinated! There are constant arguments about its synonymy with Trichocereus andalgalensis and at the moment, I consider them synonymous. Trichocereus andalgalensis was described as a red flowering variety of T. huascha (T. huascha v.rubriflorus), but since there are also yellow flowering T. andalgalensis at the original site, this is not really a species that I consider correct.

Origin of Trichocereus huascha:

Argentina. Very widely distributed and can be found almost everywhere around Catamarca & La Rioja. The plant grows at 900-2000 meters altitude.

Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha

By izzyplante from Montreal, Canada

By Cliff from Arlington, Virginia, USA Echinopsis huascha

Trichocereus huascha By Cliff from Arlington, Virginia, USAThis plant looks more like a Trichocereus candicans, but I am still keeping it here for now because it´s from a botanical garden and it migt actually be a hybrid between these two species. Photo by Cliff from Arlington, Virginia, USA Echinopsis huascha

Trichocereus huascha v. rubriflorus Trichocereus andalgalensis By Lord Koxinga2

Trichocereus huascha v. rubriflorus Trichocereus andalgalensis By Lord Koxinga2

By Lord Koxinga

Trichocereus huascha v. rubriflorus Trichocereus andalgalensis By Lord Koxinga

 Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha

by stickpen-

by stickpen-Trichocereus huascha amarillaby stickpen Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha

by stickpen Trichocereus huascha

by peter a mansfeld Trichocereus huascha v. pecheretianus (ex. grandiflorus) by Peter A. MansfeldT.huascha v. pecheretianus (ex. grandiflorus) by Peter A. Mansfeld

Trichocereus grandiflorus Echinopsis Trichocereus rowleyiby Daderot huascha (ex Grandiflorus) – Botanischer Garten Freiburg

Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha frank vincentz  by frank vincentz Jardin Echinopsis_huascha

Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha Soehrensia Helianthocereus allie caulfield

Soehrensia_huascha by Allie Caulfield

Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha Soehrensia Helianthocereus by Raffi Kojan Gardenology.org

by Raffi Kojan Gardenology.org

Trichocereus huascha Orange Flower Echinopsis huascha Soehrensia Helianthocereus Dru Bloomfield  Trichocereus huascha Orange Flower Echinopsis huascha Soehrensia Helianthocereus Dru Bloomfield   2Dru Bloomfield Echinopsis_huaschaBy Jofre Vlastní fotobanka Trichocereus huascha rubriflora Echinopsis huascha Soehrensia Helianthocereus

By Jofre Vlastní fotobanka Echinopsis huascha var. rubriflora

 

Trichocereus huascha Flower Echinopsis huascha Soehrensia Helianthocereus

E.huascha  in a private garden ( Photo: De Wet Swart)

Trichocereus huascha v. auricolor Echinopsis huascha Flower

Tr.huascha v. auricolor Echinopsis huascha Flower

Photos below: Tr. huascha v. rubriflorus Delia Kisar

Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha Lobivia Helianthocereus Delia 8Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha Lobivia Helianthocereus Delia 7Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha Lobivia Helianthocereus Delia 6  Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha Lobivia Helianthocereus Delia 9Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha Lobivia Helianthocereus Delia 5Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha Lobivia Helianthocereus Delia4Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha Lobivia Helianthocereus Delia 2Trichocereus huascha Echinopsis huascha Lobivia Helianthocereus Delia 3

 

Trichocereus deserticolus (Echinopsis deserticola)

Trichocereus deserticolus (Echinopsis deserticola)

Trichocereus deserticolus, also known as Echinopsis deserticola, is a columnar cactus from Chile. This species also includes Trichocereus fulvilanus / Echinopsis fulvilana as a subspecies of Echinopsis deserticola now.

Trichocereus deserticolus / Echinopsis deserticola Patrick Noll

Trichocereus deserticolus / Echinopsis deserticola Patrick Noll

Trichocereus deserticolus is a plant with a complicated and close relationship to Trichocereus fulvilanus, Trichocereus coquimbanus and Trichocereus chalaensis. They get very close to each other sometimes, for example the population between Paposo and El Cobre. Trichocereus fulvilanus grows from Caldera in the north to El Cobre, while Trichocereus deserticola grows from Paposo down in the south to Tocopilla in the north.   There are taxonomists or authors that regarded Trichocereus fulvilanus as being unrelated to Trichocereus deserticolus / Echinopsis deserticola, but I do not really share this opinion. Yes, there certainly are differences between Trichocereus deserticolus and Trichocereus fulvilanus, but a blind man could see that both are as closely related as it can get.

Synonyms of E.deserticola:

Echinopsis deserticola, Trichocereus deserticola, Cereus deserticola, Cereus fulvilanus, Echinopsis fulvilanus, Echinopsis fulvilana,Trichocereus deserticolus, Echinopsis deserticolus

Origin of T.deserticolus:

Chile. The type location is Antofagasta. It also grows around Atacama, El cobre, Paposo, Tocopilla, etc. Trichocereus deserticolus grows in a moister climate than Trichocereus fulvilanus, which grows around the coastlines and that prefers a drier climate. Because of that, Trichocereus deserticolus can rather be found in the higher areas around Paposo, where it is extremely common.

Description of Tr. deserticolus: 

Trichocereus deserticolus is a branched plant that does not get as big as other Trichocereus species. It´s usually somewhere between 1-2 meters tall, but most of them are around 1 meter.

Ribs:

9-13, with very strong furrows. This plant is somewhat similar to Trichocereus chalaensis, which grows creeping.

The areoles are 1-2 centimeter apart of each other. Trichocereus deserticola usually has 2-3 middle thorns and 18-24 radial thorns. Which are very thin and have a dark brown/reddish color. The epidermis of the skin shows a very weak, pale green color.

Flowers: The flowers are white and a little bit smaller than the ones on other Trichocereus species. The size of the flowers is between 5 and 12 centimeters. They have brown/black hairs and the fruits are round and can be eaten.

In a wider sense, this plant is most likely related to Trichocereus chiloensis as well. However, the exact genetic situation has to be revealed by DNA testing. 

Cultivation:

Trichocereus deserticolus should be treated just like every other Trichocereus from Chile. It only needs watering during the hot season and requires a soil that dries out very fast. I usually use purely mineral soil mixes and as Chilean Trichocereus species, Trichocereus deserticolus aka Echinopsis deserticola likes it a lot

Buy T.deserticolus:

There are almost no seeds of Trichocereus deserticola available. Sometimes you can get small cuttings on sites like eBay. I sometimes have seeds of this species available and I can recommend that you join our Trichocereus group or Newsletter to stay in touch.

Winter protection:

Trichocereus deserticolus should not be kept at temperatures below -5° Celsius and the plants have to be completely dry if you want to overwinter them at a cold climate. A perfect overwintering temperature is around 10° celsius, which is something around 50° Fahrenheit. The plants should be kept at a bright and well ventilated area.

 

Trichocereus deserticolus / Echinopsis deserticola Patrick Noll 2

Trichocereus deserticolus / Echinopsis deserticola Patrick Noll 3

Trichocereus deserticolus / Echinopsis deserticola Patrick Noll 5

leonora enking Echinopsis deserticola Trichocereus deserticolus

leonora enking Echinopsis deserticola Trichocereus deserticolus

 leonora enking Echinopsis deserticola Trichocereus deserticolus 2

leonora enking 2

by leonora enking Trichocereus deserticolus flower Echinopsis deserticola_(1)

By Leonora Enking

Photos below: Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus deserticolus Echinopsis deserticola Pedro Lopez Artes (4)Trichocereus deserticolus Echinopsis deserticola Pedro Lopez Artes (5)Trichocereus deserticolus Echinopsis deserticola Pedro Lopez Artes (6)Trichocereus deserticolus Echinopsis deserticola Pedro Lopez Artes (7)  Trichocereus deserticolus Echinopsis deserticola Pedro Lopez Artes (9)Trichocereus deserticolus Echinopsis deserticola Pedro Lopez Artes (10)Trichocereus deserticolus Echinopsis deserticola Pedro Lopez Artes (10)Trichocereus deserticolus Echinopsis deserticola Pedro Lopez Artes (3)Trichocereus deserticolus Echinopsis deserticola Pedro Lopez Artes (11)

Below: The subspecies Tr.deserticolus ssp. fulvilanus

by Michael Wolf Trichocereus fulvilanus Echinopsis fulvilana

by Michael Wolf

Trichocereus fulvilanus v. longispina flower photos:

Trichocereus fulvilanus v. longispinus flower photos Echinopsis fulvilanaTrichocereus fulvilanus v. longispinus flower photos Echinopsis fulvilana 2Trichocereus fulvilanus v. longispinus flower photos Echinopsis fulvilana 3Trichocereus fulvilanus v. longispinus flower photos Echinopsis fulvilana 4Trichocereus fulvilanus v. longispinus flower photos Echinopsis fulvilana 5Trichocereus fulvilanus v. longispinus flower photos Echinopsis fulvilana 7

Trichocereus cuzcoensis – Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus cuzcoensis – Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus cuzcoensis is a Trichocereus species from Cusco in Peru. It is described as from Cusco and in sense  of the description plants only count as being part of this species if they are from Cusco, but close relatives of Trichocereus cuzcoensis also occur in many other parts of Peru, e.g. Trichocereus knuthianus, Trichocereus schoenii, Trichocereus tarmaensis, etc.

Trichocereus cuzcoensis is currently still called Echinopsis cuzcoensis, but many good authors have abandoned this sinking ship and went back to use the Trichocereus names. Trichocereus cuzcoensis, also known as Echinopsis cuzcoensis, is an accepted species, despite it´s obvious similarity to Trichocereus peruvianus. There are countless intermediates between Trichocereus peruvianus and Trichocereus cuzcoensis (especially where both grow together) and there are many regional forms that show traits of both species.  As an example, there are Peruvianoid forms of Trichocereus cuzcoensis and there are specimens of Trichocereus peruvianus that show some traits of Trichocereus cuzcoensis. Personally, I think that Trichocereus cuzcoensis and Trichocereus peruvianus are so similar that they are at least subspecies or varieties of the same species. We´ve already seen lots of different regional forms of Trichocereus cuzcoensis. Everywhere T.cuzcoensis grows in direct neighborhood of Trichocereus peruvianus, they hybridize with each other and form transitional forms. The whole group around Trichocereus peruvianus is extremely variable and that also includes Trichocereus cuzcoensis as well. Please note that Trichocereus cuzcoensis is MORE than just Karel Knize´s KK242, which has become THE textbook definition of a cuzco. The hate around KK242 is responsible for giving the species a bad rep and that´s absolutely not justified as far as we are concerned. It´s a beautiful and unique species and large mother plants are usually stunning.

Because there are countless forms of Trichocereus cuzcoensis or its close relatives, we started collecting as many photos as we can to put them here together. 

Description of T. cuzcoensis:

Trichocereus Cuzcoensis is a columnar cactus that grows columnar and is pupping from the base. It can get more than five meters tall, though most collection plants that are grown in pots do not exceed 2 meters. However, in countries like Australia, there are many huge plants of Trichocereus cuzcoensis to be found. New growth has a bright green color. It can get between 7 -9 rounded Ribs and the areoles are approximately 1-2 centimeters apart from each other. Trichocereus cuzcoensis has many, very strong spines. The number of spines is very variable but in most cases, I observed between 8-12 spines. The spines usually have a rounded, knobby base. New spine growth is yellow or dark brown while old spine growth is usually dark gray to white with slight black undertones or black spine tips. The spines usually are between 5-10 centimeters long. If you have a suspected E.cuzcoensis with a low rib count, it is likely not a Cuzco but a close relative such as the plants from San Marcos, T. schoenii, T. santaensis, etc.

Trichocereus cuzcoensis is a night-flowering species but the flowers usually stay fresh until the morning of the next day. It is self-sterile and you need another specimen as pollen donor in order to produce seed.

Flower:

The flower color is white and the flower is usually very large. It measures up to 16 centimeters, the tube is green and 7-8 centimeters long. Petals are approximately 5 centimeters long and there are hairs covering the flower.

Type locality:

Peru, Cuzco. Cuzcoensis relatives from other areas do not count as T.cuzcoensis is the sense of the description.

Synonyms, commercial names & Varieties:

Trichocereus knuthianus, Trichocereus crassiarboreus, Cereus cuzcoensis, KK242, KK340, KK1911 Knuthianus, Trichocereus tarmaensis. Please note that some of these are close relatives that we count in the winder context of this species.

Cultivation:

Trichocereus Cuzcoensis is grown just like other Trichocereus species. It´s a very tough and frost hardy species and is able to cope with temperatures down to -9° celsius/15.8° Fahrenheit for short periods of time. The minimum average temperature is 10° celsius/50° fahrenheit. That temperature is also the minimum temperature that it needs to stay healthy during the winter.

Winter protection:

Trichocereus cuzcoensis can be overwintered in a bright and well ventilated place. The temperature should be around 9-10° Celsius and the plants need to be completely dry. In european countries, the growers stop giving water and fertilizer in late summer (September or October) and take em in until early May or April. Keeping the plants dry and cold over winter also helps to increase flower production. Plants that are kept in a warm room over the winter lose their ability to flower. Besides, plants or seedlings need to be watered on a regular basis as soon as you have them in a heated room. If you want to overwinter a Trichocereus in a warm room (20°-30° Celsius), you have to water it on a regular basis. You can only overwinter a plant “dry” if the temperatures are low.

Growing Trichocereus cuzcoensis from seed: Trichocereus cuzcoensis is very easy from seed, because it is relatively resistant to most pests. One of the biggest challenges is to get good quality seed because most cuzcoensis seed on the market is pretty old and some do not even germinate. I am constantly looking for interesting new types of Trichocereus cuzcoensis, because they are amazing plants. Take a look at the pics from the Sacred Succulents Field Trips that are labeled “Cuzcoensis” and you will most likely agree. Germination temperature for Trichocereus cuzcoensis is between 26° and 30° celsius. It only needs very little water to induce germinations and if you have quality seed, they will germinate within 2-6 weeks. If nothing shows up by the 6th week, you will probably not get germinations at all. In this case, remove the lid, let the soil dry out and start with the germination process again. Those cycles mimic the way this actually happens in nature and sometimes, you will be able to re-activate dead seed. You can also add GA-3, which is Gibberelic Acid or use a strong HPS or LED lamp to wake the seeds up, because ultraviolet light increases germination rates. In general, Trichocereus seeds need light to germinate, so do not cover them with soil.

Trichocereus cuzcoensis Seed Sources: I have some great seeds in my shop right now. The first one comes from Huancavelica in Peru and the other one is somewhere between Trichocereus peruvianus and Trichocereus cuzcoensis.

Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 Master Evan EchinopsisThis looks like a very typical Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242. This strain was originally brought into cultivation by Karel Knize. He also sold various types of similar plants labeled as Trichocereus cuzcoensis, Trichocereus macrogonus or Trichocereus peruvianus. The label KK242 does not refer to a particular plant but the area where the seeds/cuttings were collected at. Because of that, there are many plants labeled KK242 which are NOT a Trichocereus cuzcoensis. The type just looks so unique and remarkable that it stuck and most plants that look like this are usually identified as KK242. Which is not really correct because that´s just one of the many types that grow within the KK242 range. However, most of the KK242 are in fact Trichocereus cuzcoensis. Pic: Master Evan

Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 Echinopsis cuzcoensisAnother KK242

Below: A form of KK242 that is not a Trichocereus cuzcoensis.

Trichocereus Cuzcoensis KK242 Rio Lurin_J33_2_jpg

One of the many faces of KK242. Copyright K.Trout

3 Trichocereus cuzcoensis, Lamay, Cusco, Peru 2010 copyright B

Ben Kamm

Copyright: Ben Kamm, Sacred Succulents

Also check out this posting with many cool Cuzcos fom the Sacredsucculents Field Trips!

Trichocereus cuzcoensis Echinopsis cuzcoensis Nitrogen

Nitrogen

Trichocereus cuzcoensis - Echinopsis cuzcoensis Nitrogen

Nitrogen

Trichocereus cuzcoensis Echinopsis cuzcoensis Delia Kisar Delia Kisar Trichocereus cuzcoensis Echinopsis cuzcoensis Delia Kisar

Trichocereus cuzcoensis Rodni Kisar

Rodni Kisar

Trichocereus cuzcoensis Echinopsis cuzcoensisTrichocereus cuzcoensis Echinopsis cuzcoensis 3

Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 Echinopsis cuzcoensis

KK242 Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus chiloensis (Echinopsis chiloensis) T.chilensis

Trichocereus chiloensis (Echinopsis chiloensis) T.chilensis

Trichocereus chiloensis, also known as Trichocereus chilensis or Echinopsis chiloensis, is a columnar cactus from Chile. It is closely related to Trichocereus terscheckii and something like the Chilean version of the large Andean Trichocereus species.

Current name:

Echinopsis chiloensis H.Friedrich & G.D.

Synonyms of T. chiloensis:

T. chilensis, T. chiloensis, Echinopsis chilensis, E. chiloensis, Cactus chiloensis, cereus chiloensis, Trichocereus skottsbergii, Trichocereus nigripilus, Echinopsis skottsbergii, Echinopsis nigripilus, Trichocereus spinibarbis. Trichocereus litoralis, Echinopsis litoralis, Trichocereus bolligerianus, Echinopsis bolligerianus

It´s debatable whether or not Trichocereus litoralis and Trichocereus coquimbanus are synonymous with Trichocereus chiloensis, but there is a clear connection and intermediates exist. 

Some people consider Eulychnia eburnea to be synonymous with Tr. chiloensis / E. chiloensis, but I disagree vehemently. The plants look kinda similar, but the flowers of them are very different and clearly belong to the genus Eulychnia.

This Trichocereus species is the predominant Trichocereus in Chile. The Name “chiloensis” is the taxonomically correct one, but there´s a very high chance this was typo as the name was supposed to mean”Chilean Trichocereus” and not “Trichocereus from Chiloe”. T. chilensis doesn not grow anywhere near the island of Chiloe. This makes the confusion around the name even more ridiculous. I understand that Taxonomy has to prefer the earliest name recorded, but in this case, the name Trichocereus chilensis should be ignored because it is the taxonomic equivalent of a typo.

Trichocereus chilensis grows from the Provence Talca in the south of Chile down to the Elqui Valley in the Provence Coquimbo in the north. There are various varieties and the maximum size of the plants varies greatly. Trichocereus chiloensis is one of the most typical cacti in Chile, grows like a tree and can get up to 6-7 meters tall. It grows as strong columns that reach a maximum diameter of 15 centimeters. The areoles are white/beige and up to 2 centimeters long. It has 10-12 radial spines that are up to 2 centimeters large and 2-4 middle spines. The middle spines are usually between 5-10 centimeters long-

Flower: The flower of Trichocereus chilensis is a little smaller than the ones on other Trichocereus species. It is between 8-14 centimeters long. The tube has very little hair on it and is 4-6 centimeters long, white petals (up to 5 centimeters long). Trichocereus chiloensis is a diurnal species, but the flowers tend to stay open for a very long time, sometimes even up late into the night so you might get the idea it is actually night flowering. There are many varieties or intermediates of Trichocereus chilensis, which grow all around the habitats and in the area where different types grow in the neighborhood of each other.

Varieties or regional forms:

Trichocereus chiloensis var. eburneus

Trichocereus chiloensis pantholipes

Trichocereus chiloensis borealis

Trichocereus chiloensis ssp. borealis Patrick Noll

Trichocereus chiloensis var. australis

Trichocereus chiloensis var. conjungens

Trichocereus chiloensis var. skottsbergii

Trichocereus skottsbergii Trichocereus chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes JN 380 Highway Fray Jorge, Coquimbo, Chile 269m

Trichocereus skottsbergii Trichocereus chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes JN 380 Highway Fray Jorge, Coquimbo, Chile 269m (2)

Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus chiloensis var. litoralis

Trichocereus chiloensis ssp. litoralis Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus chiloensis ssp. litoralis Pedro Lopez Artes (2)

Pedro Lopez Artes

Cultivation of E. chiloensis:

Trichocereus chiloensis is a very tough cactus, just like many other cacti from Bolivian or Chilean deserts . They can take extreme heat and are very easy to grow. But they don’t like too much water, so you should never give too much water at once. They should only be watered in summer and require dry soil medium during the winter. Besides, they need a temperature change during the water in order to produce flowers. That means that you should overwinter Trichocereus chiloensis in a bright and well-ventilated room between October and April until there are no more night frosts. Trichocereus chiloensis is able to tolerate slight night frosts but the temperatures should not drop below -9° Celsius or you might lose the cactus. Apart from that, Trichocereus chiloensis is really easy and can thrive on very poor soil medium. I can recommend purely mineral soil mixes for them because they tend to rot when there is too much humus in the soil. A cactus that is kept in a mineral substrate can stay wet for much longer without any damage to the roots that one that is grown in a highly humus substrate.

Growing Trichocereus chiloensis from Seed: Trichocereus chiloensis is similarly easy from seed as any other Trichocereus. The seeds stay long for 5-10 years, though it´s best to use seeds that are not older than one year. The seeds need light to germinate and you usually sprinkle them on top of the soil and put the pot/sowing container in a room with a temperature between 25-30° Celsius for 2-6 weeks. If you still have no seedlings after 2-6 weeks, chances are that the seeds are not viable. There are not many suppliers for seed of Trichocereus chiloensis. 

Right now I have a terrific strain of Trichocereus chilensis ssp. litoralis in my shop. Check it out here. 

trichocereus chiloensis chilensis huntington botanical gardenTrichocereus Chilensis – Huntington Botanical Garden by Richard Hipp

Jimmy Baikovicius -Echinopsis_chiloensis_(2) Trichocereus chiloensis

Jimmy Baikovicius -Echinopsis_chiloensis_(2) Trichocereus chiloensis

Jimmy Baikovicius -Echinopsis_chiloensis

Jimmy Baikovicius Echinopsis_chiloensis_(1)

Jimmy Baikovicius -Echinopsis_chiloensis_(2) Trichocereus chiloensis 22

Jimmy Baikovicius Echinopsis_chiloensis

Echinopsis chiloensis by penarc_8 Trichocereus chiloensis chilensis

Echinopsis chilensis by penarc

Echinopsis chilensis by penarc

Echinopsis chiloensis Trichocereus chiloensis scott zona scott zona Chusquea_cumingii_by_Scott_Zona

by jorge barrios Echinopsis chiloensis Trichocereus chiloensisby jorge barrios Cactus Chile

Stan Shebs Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis chilensis

by Stan ShebsStan Shebs Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Chilensis

Stan Shebs Trichocereus_chiloensis

Stan Shebs Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Chilensis 2Stan shebs Trichocereus_chiloensis

milodon3 -Quisco Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Chilensismilodon3 -Quisco

pato novia Echinopsis chiloensis v. litoralis Trichocereus litoralis

pato novia Leucostele_chiloensis_(littoralis)

Raffi Kojian Gardenology.org-IMG_2370_Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis ChilensisRaffi Kojian Gardenology.org

Jason Hollinger Echinopsis chiloensis Trichocereus chiloensis Chilensis

Jason Hollinger Echiopsis_chiloensis

matthias ott Echinopsis chiloensis Trichocereus chiloensis flowermatthias ott Echinopsis_sp

Trichocereus chiloensis v. skottsbergii Echinopsis chiloensis Trichocereus chiloensis ssp. skottsbergii Pato_Novoa

milodon3 Photo flower trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis

milodon3 Echinopsis_Chiloensis

jason hollinger Photo flower of trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis

jason hollinger Echinopsis_chiloensisyazz Echinopsis chiloensis Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensisyazz Echinopsis_chiloensis_Yazz

penarc Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis flower collaby penarc Echinopsis_chiloensis_Colla

penarc Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensispenarc Echinopsis_chiloensis

daderot Echinopsis_chiloensis_-_Palmengarten_Frankfurt Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis

by daderot Echinopsis_chiloensis_-_Palmengarten_Frankfurtdaderot Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis Palmengarten Frankfurtdaderot Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis Botanical_Garden_in_Kaisaniemi,_Helsinki

daderot -Echinopsis_chiloensis_-_Botanical_Garden_in_Kaisaniemi,_Helsinki

dick culbert Photo flower of trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensisdick culbert Echinopsis_chiloensis

dick culbert Photo flower of trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis

dick culbert Echinopsis_chiloensis_

Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis

Photos below: Trichocereus chilonsis Anda Collo Braulio Gonzales

Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Anda Collo Braulio Gonzales (4)Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Anda Collo Braulio Gonzales (2)

Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Anda Collo Braulio Gonzales (3)

Trichocereus chiloensis_v. longispinus from the Fields Collection (Rodni Kisar)

Photo Trichocereus chiloensis Rodni KisarTrichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis Rodni Kisar

T.chiloensis (Pedro Lopez Artes)

Trichocereus chiloensis fruit Echinopsis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes

E. chilensis v.longispinus (Rodni and Delia Kisar)

Trichocereus chiloensis v. longispinus from Fields Echinopsis chiloensis Rodni Kisar 2Trichocereus chiloensis v. longispinus from Fields Echinopsis chiloensis Rodni KisarTrichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Delia Kisar (3)    Photo by Michelle Killen, culture plant in the United States

Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Michelle Killen (2)

Chilensis v. longispinus Delia Kisar

Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Delia Kisar Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Delia Kisar (2)

Photo by Michelle Killen

Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Michelle Killen

Pedro Lopez Artes Trichocereus chiloensis Pedro Lopez ArtesTrichocereus chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes (2) Photo: Jason Hollinger Trichocereus chiloensis ason Hollinger

If you want to see more photos of this species or enjoyed this free article, please join our Trichocereus Facebook group or Instagram.

Also check out our other articles in our Trichocereus species database.

The history of the PC Cactus / PC Trichocereus clone

Trichocereus deserticolus / Echinopsis deserticola

Trichocereus camarguensis / Echinopsis camarguensis

Trichocereus camarguensis / Echinopsis camarguensis

Trichocereus camarguensis, also known as Echinopsis camarguensis, is a Bolivian cactus from Camargo.

Synonyms of Trichocereus camarguensis:

Echinopsis camarguensis, Trichocereus caulescens, Echinopsis caulenscens

Trichocereus camarguensis is a thin Cactus that resembles Trichocereus strigonus, huascha and some forms  of T. spachianus. It has golden Spines. Live cuttings and seeds of Trichocereus camarguensis were distributed by various sources, including Karel Knize under the collection Number KK1414. There also are many hybrids available. Trichocereus cajasensis is closely related and is considered to be a separate species by some authors. DNA testing is necessary to look into this.

Description of Trichocereus camarguensis: 

Thin columnar cactus that can get up to 50-60 centimeters tall. It grows prostrate and usually leans forward because of its tendency to creep. The epidermis is bright to pale green with many golden spines. 13-15 ribs and areoles are around 1 centimeter apart of each other. This cactus can resemble Trichocereus huascha and Trichocereus strigosus, but does not reach its large height!

Spines: 

12-15 radial spines and 1-3 middle spines that are up to 5 centimeters long, The spines are bright yellow and like very thin, fine needles.

Flower:  

White. Up to 22 centimeters long, tube with dark gray hairs, sepals are pink/purple/green and white petals (up to 10 centimeters)

Fruit of Echinopsis camarguensis:

Round fruit, up to 3 centimeters in diameter

Origin:

Bolivia, near Camargo, 2750 meters. Chuqisaca, Tarija, Potosi

Trichocereus camarguensis is a night-flowering species. It also is self-sterile, what means you need pollen from a second plant to get seeds.

Cultivation of T. camarguensis:

Trichocereus camarguensis is USDA 10-12. It originally comes from Bolivia, where there is very little water and should not be overwatered. They are much more likely to rot than a Trichocereus pachanoi or Trichocereus peruvianus. So keep them more on the dry side and don’t water when it’s cold or rainy because that attracts mold and other infections. They like a mineral substrate and can deal with quite a lot of sun. The minimum average temperature should not go below 10° Celsius and that´s actually the temperature that you should overwinter them. Only water them between May and October if you have to bring them inside to overwinter. If you don´t have the luck to live in a country where you can grow them outside,then better not try it because they will most likely not make it through the winter! Just make sure to provide them with a winter protection that keeps em from getting wet all the time. They should take short, nightly frosts, but the absolute minimum is -9° Celsius/15.8 Fahrenheit. Frost resistance also depends on many other factors, like general health, soil composition and humidity.

Growing Trichocereus carmaguensis from seed:

The same requirements as most other Bolivian Trichocereus species. Seeds need light to germinate and seedlings prefer mineral substrate. Sprinkle the seeds on top of the soil and put the pot/container in a warm room (25°-29°) and make sure it´s not getting too hot in there. As soon as all the seeds have germinated, keep a close eye on the temperatures because they can die from heat quite easily. Temps should not go above 30° Celsius! Especially in closed containers, temps can be substantially higher than in the room around them.

Where to get seed:

There are not many seed sources for Trichocereus camarguensis available right now. I have received some top notch seeds from the current harvest by a friend this year. Check out the shop to buy some Trichocereus camarguensis seeds.

Hybrid Culture:

Trichocereus camarguensis is used extensively in hybrid culture because they flower early on and produce a beautiful flower. Because of that there are many camarguensis hybrids with a flower other than white.

Similarity to Trichocereus strigonus

Trichocereus camarguensis and Trichocereus strigonus are extremely similar. The difference is that Trichocereus camarguensis only has yellow spines, while T. strigonus has yellow and red colored forms. In addition, T. strigonus has much more spines and is a bit taller.

Trichocereus camarguensis Echinopsis camarguensis Camargo
Photo: Trichocereus camarguensis (Dean Karras)

Teguise_Guatiza_-_Jardin_-_Echinopsis_camarguensis_01_ies

by Frank Vincentz

by daderot Echinopsis_camarguensis_-_Brooklyn_Botanic_Garden_-_Brooklyn,_NY_-_DSC08064This photo is labeled as Trichocereus camarguensis, but probably shows Trichocereus strigonus. Trichocereus camarguensis does not have red spines.  by Daderot

trichocereus camarguensis huntington echinopsisTrichocereus camarguensis / Echinopsis camarguensis

Huntington Botanical Garden by Richard Hipp

Trichocereus camarguensis KK1414 Echinopsis camarguensis

Trichocereus camarguensis KK1414

 

Trichocereus andalgalensis / Echinopsis huascha v. andalgalensis

Trichocereus andalgalensis / Echinopsis huascha v. andalgalensis

Synonyms: Echinopsis andalgalensis, Lobivia andalgalensis, Cereus andalgalensis, Cereus huascha var. rubriflorus, Trichocereus huascha var. rubriflorus

Trichocereus andalgalensis has a weird & complicated history. The name first appeared in 1893 in the MONATSZEITSCHRIFT FÜR KAKTEENKUNDE, which is a German publication about cacti. The plant was originally introduced into the world of taxonomy as a red flowering variety of Cereus huascha (Trichocereus huascha). In his book, Schuman mentioned that Weber described this plant and regard the red flowering variety of Cereus huascha (now Trichocereus huascha) to be a separate species called Cereus andalgalensis. The plant is very similar to Trichocereus huascha and was recently declared to be synonymous with Trichocereus huascha. The current taxonomy tends to merge relative plants together in larger, more variable species and I absolutely agree with that. The species was originally found near Andalgala, has very fine yellow spines and is sprouting from the base.

Now back to the time when Cereus andalgalensis was first desctribed. Back then, a cactus enthusiast and taxonomist called Spegazzini somehow got the idea that the name Cereus andalgalensis would actually be about a small Lobivia that was found near Ancasti. Which was absolutely not the case, since Trichocereus Andalgalensis is a columnar cactus that grows very much like Trichocereus Huascha (but does not get as big) and not a small clumping Lobivia.

And when Britton & Rose wrote their cactus manifest called THE CACTACEAE, they did not realize that Spegazzini described a completely different plant and published the troubled description in their as Lobivia andalgalensis B&R and declared that Lobivia to be synonymous with the red flowering variety of Trichocereus huascha (Trichocereus andalgalensis), which back then was called Cereus huascha Rubriflorus. Now, there were two different plants that were considered to be the same plant. And one (the Lobivia) did absolutely not fit into Weber´s old description of a columnar cactus.
Weber originally gave Andalgala in the province Catamarca to be the type location of the plant. Exactly where Rauh found a small clustering Trichocereus that fit into Webers old description and which was most likely the original origin of Trichocereus andalgalensis, which was back then still called Cereus andalgalensis.

Description: Trichocereus andalagensis is bright green in color and reaches a maximum diameter of up to 6 centimeters. The shoots can reach a maximum height of 10-40 Centimeters. It´s pretty typical for this plant to sprout abundantly from the base, even at a relatively young age.

Ribs: Trichocereus andalgalensis has 10-18 Ribs that are up to 5 mm high and between 5-10 mm wide. The areoles are brown and declining in color with age. The areoles are between 1-3 mm in diameter and 5-10 mm apart of each other.

Spines: The spines of Trichocereus andalgalensis are yellow, very similar as the ones on Trichocereus spachianus. All spines are very fine and needle-like. It has 7-15 radial spines that can get up to 1,5 mm long and 1-2 middle spines, which are 1-4 cm long.

Flowers: The flowers are usually red and up to 8,5 cm long, what makes the flower of Trichocereus andalgalensis one of the smallest flowers on a Trichocereus species. The flowers are and have a lot of brown hairs. There also is a variety with a yellow flower. The yellow variety is called Trichocereus andalgalensis var. flaviflorus and the red flowering one is Trichocereus andalgalensis var. rubriflorus.

Where to buy seeds or plants of Trichocereus andalgalensis?: There only are a couple of sources where you can get seeds of Trichocereus andalgalensis. One is Sacred Succulents, which was offering very viable seeds of this amazing cactus. Köhres has them in stock sometimes too though I have no idea how the germination rate of those is. Apart from that, I am not aware of any commercial sources that sell this seed. If you have a shop and have them in stock, you can let me know and I´ll add you to this page. You can also make a posting about Trichocereus andalgalensis in our Trichocereus Facebook Group. It´s not a very common type, but chances are some of our older members might still have some from the time when Friedrich Ritter sold seeds of this plant as FR 428.

Trichocereus Andalgalensis var. Auricolor

This b/w pic shows Trichocereus Andalgalensis var. auricolor. It is probably the same type as shown in the color pics below.

Trichocereus huascha v. andalgalensis

 

Photo: Jofre Vlastni

Photo: Allie Caulfeld

Pics below show a Yellow flowering version: K.Trout – Troutsnotes.com

T_andalgalensis_SS_d_JPG

T_andalgalensis_SS_a_JPG

T_andalgalensis_SS_b_JPG

T_andalgalensis_SS_c_JPG

Unfortunately, I do not have pics of the red flowering Trichocereus andalgalensis but I will add more pics as soon as I get some.

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Current name: Echinopsis arboricola (Kimnach) Mottram

Origin: Bolivia, Argentina, Type locality: Tarija in Bolivia, 600-1000 meters altitude

Trichocereus arboricola is more of an Epiphyte instead of a normal Trichocereus and is often grown like a hanging basket cactus. It often starts off as a columnar cactus, but goes prostrate as soon as it reaches a certain size. You can grow it in a hanging basket or like a columnar Trichocereus.

It’s a very tender cactus with a shiny, bright green color and very thin, needle-like spines. It can reach a total size of more than a meter and up to 5 centimeters in diameter. It usually has 10+ ribs and has very small, very subtle bumps over the areoles, which are slightly felted. The areoles are up to 5 mm apart from each other. It develops aerial roots and has very fine hair on the areoles. Trichocereus arboricola has between 10-16 spines, which are very thin and similar to the spines on some Cleistocactus species.

Trichocereus arboricola is a night flowering species and has a very beautiful flower, which is very large for its size and white in color. It has a very delicate and noble flower.

Trichocereus arboricola is a fairly new species and was described in 1997. Because of that, it’s not included in many old cactus books.

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Copyright: Trichocereus.net

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Copyright: K.Trout, troutsnotes.com

 

Get our cool Seed & Plant List and Newsletter!

Subscribe to our Trichocereus Seed & Plant List/ Newsletter and get interesting stuff, discounts and updates to your email inbox. The Newsletter rocks! Worldwide Seed Shipping and Plants/Cuttings shipping within the EU/Germany!

Congratulations, you´ve been Trichocereusd!

You broke the internet!

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close