Tag: Trichocereus Validus

Trichocereus validus / Echinopsis valida

Trichocereus Validus Monv. aka Echinopsis Valida

Trichocereus validus, also known as Echinopsis valida, is a columnar cactus that´s closely related to Trichocereus terscheckii. I consider it a form, variety or subspecies of Echinopsis terscheckii. Which one´s exactly the case will have to be decided by DNA testing .

Synonyms:

Cereus validissimus, Echinopsis valida, Echinopsis validus, Echinopsis robbinsoniana, Cereus forbesii, Trichocereus forbesii, cereus forbesii, Echinopsis rhodotricha, Trichocereus rhodotricha, Trichocereus terscheckii, Trichocereus terscheckii

Trichocereus validus grows like a tree and can get up to 40 centimeters in diameter. It doesnt get quite as thick as Trichocereus terscheckii, which is a close relative of it. The origin of Trichocereus validus is not know, was but it was probably Bolivia. In Bolivia, there are various Andean Trichocereus species from the Trichocereus terscheckii complex that this species could have come from. There´s populations of Trichocereus werdermannianus and Trichocereus tacaquirensis, which are both very similar in appearance. My personal impression is that Trichocereus validus is just one particular type of Trichocereus terscheckii.

Ribs:

10-12. Older specimens have a higher rib count, which is pretty typical. There are very little spines around the upper half of the body, what makes it look like a nearly spineless version of Trichocereus terscheckii.

The areoles are 2,5 – 3,5 centimeters apart of each other. 5-10 radial spines that are up to 4 centimeters long with a very typical outwards pointing spine, which is actually the lowest on the areole. In addition, Trichocereus Validus has approximately 1-2 middle spines. 5-10 centimeters long.  Spines have a very small but visible rounded spine base. The spine color is yellow, similar to the one on Trichocereus Terscheckii.

Flower of Trichocereus validus:

White. Similar to Trichocereus terscheckii and between 10-15 centimeters long and up to 15 centimeters in diameter. Gray-brown hairs on the flower and white petals.

Fruit of T.validus:

Round fruit with wool & hairs on top of it.

The original description of Trichoecreus validus was written after a bad photo, and there was no flower photo or description originally. However, a flower description could be made eventually after a plant that grew in the Botanical Garden in De Cedres and the photos we saw did show a very close relative of Trichocereus terscheckii. While it has pretty unique spination, it´s still pretty obvious that the plant was some variety of Trichocereus terscheckii.

Sources for Seed & live cuttings of Trichocereus validus:

I am very proud that some of the members from our SAB forum were able to relocate this long lost plant in Australia and make it somewhat available. There were a few growers that received cuttings of this remarkable plant and we sometimes have cuttings available in our Trichocereus Facebook Group.

Another breeder who offers some seeds of Trichocereus validus is Misplant.net! He has a plant that roughly belongs to the same complex, but which isn´t quite the same mother plant to make a couple crosses every year and you can buy seed through his Seed store on Misplant! Misplant´s Trichocereus validus belongs somewhere in the relationship of it and Trichocereus uyupampensis, another rare Trichocereus that is considered (by some) to be synonymous with Trichocereus validus. Whether or not this is the case is currently not clear.

In Australia,  this plant was made available through the Fields Family and collection, who owned two large mother plants before the collection was donated to the Melbourne Botanical Garden.  In addition, you can get seeds of Trichocereus validus from Sacred Succulents but I haven’t seen their mother plant yet. I will add new sources for this plant in this article but at the moment, I do not know more.

Cultivation & frost tenderness of E.valida:

Trichocereus validus is very similar to Trichocereus terscheckii and everything I wrote about the cultivation of it applies here too. These large Andean giants can take slight night frosts, but it should not go over -5° to -7° Celsius or it will get dangerous. The plants need to be dry and the average minimum temperature should be around 10° Celsius during the cold winter months. Trichocereus validus is extremely thick and it needs a large, deep pot if you ever want to see it flowering.

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida Robbinsoniana Backeberg

trichocereus validus flower Echinopsis valida Robbinsoniana Backeberg

The Plant here was found on ebay and has many similarities to Trichocereus Validus. Chances are, it´s just some Terscheckii with a similar Spination. But since Trichocereus Validus is most likely nothing else than some Terscheckii Variety it´s not really possible to clear this up.

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida Terscheckii

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida Terscheckii 2

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida Terscheckii 3

Now the next Plant is really interesting. It is what many growers call the FIELDS Validus. It grows on a private property in Australia and the Owner originally bought some Seeds of Friedrich Ritters Collection of Trichocereus Validus and grow it out into a gigantic Monster of Awesomeness! The Plant is identical with the Plant shown in Backebergs Cactaceae and IS most likely the Terscheckii Variety that is known as Trichocereus Validus.

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida Terscheckii Fields

Rodni Kisar

This Plant grows in the Huntington Botanical Garden and is labeled Echinopsis Robinsoniana . It is actually the plant that came to fame as Trichocereus Validus. It´s probably a variety of Trichocereus Terscheckii and chances are that there are seeds labeled as that available on the market. So whenever you encounter Echinopsis Robinsoniana or Terscheckii varieties from Bolivia, it might be the plant that was once called Trichocereus Validus. I am beyond doubt that Trichocereus Validus didn´t suddenly cease to exist in cultivation but simply carries another label these days.

Echinopsis Robbinsoniana Trichocereus validus Echinopsis Robbinsoniana Trichocereus validus 3 Echinopsis Robbinsoniana Trichocereus validus 3Trichocereus validus – Huntington Botanical Garden – by Richard Hipp

Echinopsis robinsoniana Numen Nudum (Trichocereus validus)

This Plant is labelled Echinopsis robinsoniana and looks very much look the Trichocereus validus pictured in Backebergs CACTACEAE. Personally, I am absolutely sure that Echinopsis robinsoniana is just a synonym for Trichocereus validus. This plant grows in the Huntington Botanical Garden, but this species has not been found outside the Botanical Garden and most plants that are found in the wild are identified as Trichocereus terscheckii or one of its associated species. It is definitely possible to come across this plant on the botanical market, labeled as Trichocereus terscheckii, Trichocereus werdermannianus, trichocereus validus etc. There are countless forms and intermediates that belong to this complex and there is a great amount of variety within the large Andean Trichocereus species. Trichocereus pasacana is another closely related species.

Echinopsis Robinsoniana Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida

Echinopsis Robinsoniana Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida a

Echinopsis Robinsoniana Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida c

Echinopsis Robinsoniana Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida d

Echinopsis Robinsoniana Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida 67

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida

Jordan Caleija

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida 2

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida 3 Fields

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida 55

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida 666

Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida Fields

Rodni Kisar

The Garden Trichocereus validus Fields Echinopsis valida

The Fields Garden Validus, photo by Terrapin

Shed Validus Trichocereus validus Echinopsis valida Fields

The Fields Shed Validus, photo by Terrapin

If you want to buy some Trichocereus validus seeds, check out our shop

Trichocereus terscheckii (Echinopsis terscheckii)

Trichocereus terscheckii  (Echinopsis terscheckii)

Origin: Trichocereus terscheckii  is a variable species that is a catch-all name for a variety of different forms, some of which form intermediates with other species like Trichocereus atacamensis, Trichocereus taquimbalensis, Trichocereus validus and others.

Trichocereus terscheckii grows around the south of Bolivia, North Argentina (Catamarca, Tucuman, La Rioja, Jujuy, San Juan, Salta) and there are many intermediates between Trichocereus terscheckii, Trichocereus atacamensis, Trichocereus pasacana and Trichocereus validus and some of the lesser known species. The genuine Trichocereus validus is probably just a Bolivian form of Trichocereus validus, but unfortunately it is not often found in nature.

Trichocereus eerdermannianus is actually an intermediate species in between Trichocereus taquimbalensis and Trichocereus terscheckii. Overall, this is a very complex and highly controversial group of plants and only DNA testing can help to clean up the family tree that is hidden inside those beautiful tree-like plants. Personally, I think that all those Andean Trichocereus species are members of a very variable group of plants that belong together and should be treated like that.

Below you can find a description of Trichocereus terschecki, but since there are so many regional forms, there can be plants that don´t fit perfectly, but which still belong to that complex somehow. In addition, there are many natural hybrids and Trichocereus terscheckii hybridizes relatively easy.

Synonyms: Echinopsis terscheckii, Cereus terscheckii, Pilosocereus terscheckii, Cereus fulvispinus, Trichocereus validus, Echinopsis valida, Trichocereus werdermannianus, Cereus werdermannianus, Echinopsis werdermannianus, Cereus validissimus. Besides, some forms of Trichocereus pasacana and Trichocereus atacamensis are synonymous with Trichocereus terscheckii too.

Varieties: In the past, there were descriptions of a plant called Trichocereus terscheckiioides which differed in regard to the phenotype and Trichocereus terscheckii var. montanus.

Cultivation: Trichocereus terscheckii is an amazing plant in culture. They grow very slow compared to other Trichos and don’t require a lot of water. I usually try to give them as much free root run as possible, what is important for their ability to flower. Their growth rate depends on many things, like how they are grown, hoch much water & fertilizer they get, and so on. Plants in habitat grow very slow and sometimes take 50 years to reach a good size. Their mature form is totally different to what they look like as seedlings.

Description: They start off as typical columnar cacti that are pretty fat for their small size and get very big and tall later on. It takes many years till this species produces its characteristic side arms. Trichocereus terscheckii can reach a size of 10-15 meters and a diameter of up to 60 centimeters.

Ribs: 8-15

Areoles: Approx. 2 centimeters in diameter and up to 3-4 centimeters apart from each other.

Spines: 10-16 spines, yellow and up to 10 centimeters long

Flower: White, 15-22 centimeters long, 14 centimeters wide, petals up to 8 centimeters. Tube covered with brown, woolly hair. The variety Trichocereus montanus was said to be less branchy and grew more like a typical columnar. Besides it had a larger diameter. I personally do not accept any varieties because I think that this is just a crazily variable species.

Trichocereus terscheckii and Frost: Trichocereus terscheckii is quite cold hardy and even survives in some areas in the United States. Personally, I would recommend a minimum average temperature of 10° Celsius/50 Fahrenheit, but they are known to survive short night frosts without a problem. However, temperatures should never go below -9°/15.8 Fahrenheit, especially not when they have wet feet. It is also important to keep away rain and moisture during the cold months, because the rain is probably a bigger problem that the cold temperatures. Those plants can stand the cold, but as soon as it´s cold and wet, it´s starting to get dangerous.

Trichocereus terscheckii from Seed: This species is very easy from seed. It requires the same treatment as any other Trichocereus species, but keeping the seed cold over night can help to break up the dormancy. The seed is usually viable for many years and I am sure you can get some Germination as long as the seed does not get older than 10 years. But you get the best germination rates within the first year. Make sure not to sow out too many of them at once, because they become quite fat and need enough space.

Trichocereus terscheckii Seed & live cutting sources: This plant sometimes shows up on Ebay as live cuttings, plants or seeds. You can get a nice strain of Trichocereus terscheckii here in my shop:



Trichocereus Terscheckii Intermediate

The photo above shows a T. werdermannianus, which is an intermediate between T. terscheckii and T. taquimbalensis.

Trichocereus_terscheckii_pm

Pic: Peter A. Manfeld

Trichocereus_terscheckii_(close-up) (1)

 

Pic: Pangopaso

Trichocereus_terscheckioides_pm

Trichocereus terscheckii

Trichocereus terscheckii (KD Botanics)

 

Fields Validus (Trichocereus)

Fields Validus (Trichocereus validus)

This plant is one of the most popular and famed plants in the Australian Fields collection. This plant is a beautiful textbook specimen of the often-misunderstood species Trichocereus validus (Monviella).
It is still unknown from where Robert Fields sourced his plants, but I am positive we can add some more information soon. There were two different Validus plants growing at the (now defunct) Fields collection and I was lucky enough to get some photos of both plants by SAB member Terrapin! (Thanks again, mate! :-D)

If you want to learn more about the species Trichocerus validus, check out the page about it here: Trichocereus validus

 

Fields Validus Trichocereus Garden

 

Fields Validus SHED

Here is another plant that was growing at the Fields collection. Those photos came from Terrapin as well and I am happy to have them around:

Fields Validus Trichocereus Shed

Fields Validus 3 Terrapin Garden

Fields Validus 2 Terrapin Garden

 

Here are some photos showing the Fields Validus clones being grown by other Australian members;

 

Fields Validus Jordan 2
Photos: Jordan Calleija
Fields Validus Jordan

AppleMark

Trichocereus.com.au

Tr. validus Getafix 2
Member GETAFIXTr. validus Getafix 3

Trichocereus validus from Shed and Garden (Jon Nichols)

03_2015-10-10-16-42-03

garden-trichocereus-validus-fields-2
garden-trichocereus-validus-fields

Trichocereus hybrids (Echinopsis)

Trichocereus hybrids (Echinopsis)

There are all kinds of Trichocereus hybrids out there and I am happy to show you a couple of the resulting crosses on this page. I will try to update this page as often as I can, to show you what others grew from a certain cross.

Now let me add a little bit of background info to give you an understanding how this breeding works in case you are completely new to this. Almost all Trichocereus species are self-sterile. That means that you need pollen from another plant to produce seed. The pollen donor needs to be genetically different from the receiver. Because of that, it´s not possible to cross two different cuttings from the same mother plant. If you list the parents of a cross, it looks something like this:
Trichocereus peruvianus x Trichocereus bridgesii
That simply means that the Peruvianus is the mother plant, while Trichocereus bridgesii is the Father. In most cases, the resulting offspring comes closer to the mother than to the father. However, there are a lot of exceptions to this and sometimes, the genes of the father are simply more dominant.
You can cross a whole lot of Trichos with each other and most of the crosses will work, if you did it right. But there are some crosses that just genetically don´t match. For example, the seedlings produced by that cross end up being variegated/albinos or simply die. That´s actually very common and can happen all the time. It happens the most when crossing plants like Hildewintera hybrids. And that´s probably because there werent many plants in the gene pool to begin with.

Most Trichocereus species have a white flower and apart from the extremely rare Trichocereus tulhuayacensis, all San Pedros are flowering white. Because of that, this community is trying to breed some San Pedros with colored flowers. There already are a handful of hybrids involving Echinopsis pachanoi with colored flowers. One such Trichocereus hybrid is called SAARWELLEN and the other one is AMUN-RE. But both Trichocereus hybrids are extremely rare.

Now, have a look at some of the photos of Trichocereus hybrids

Trichocereus validus Hybrid

Terscheckii hybrid (1)

Terscheckii hybrid (2)

Terscheckii hybrid (3)

 

Trichocereus terscheckii x  Trichocereus bridgesii ‘Psycho0’

Terscheckii x Psycho San Pedro hybrids

Terscheckii x psycho (2)

 

Echinopsis terscheckii x Echinopsis pachanoi

Terscheckii x Pach (4)

Terscheckii x Pach (3)

Terscheckii x Pach (2)

Terscheckii x Pach (1)

 

 Trichocereus bridgesii ‘SS02’ x ‘Tom Juul´s Giant’

SS02 x Trichocereus bridgesii

SS02 x Bridgessi

SS02 x Bridgesii

 

Echinopsis peruviana ‘Sausage Plant’ x Trichocereus scopulicola

Sausage x Scop

Echinopsis peruviana ‘ROSEI 1’ x OPEN

 

 

Pachanoi x SS02

 

Echinopsis pachanoi x J3

Echinopsis scopulicola ‘Super Pedro’ x J3

Trichocereus scopulicola ‘Super Pedro’ x  Trichocereus bridgesii ‘HB02’

Fields  x Rosei #1

 

Trichocereus bridgesii ‘SS02’ x Sierra Canyon

Trichocereus bridgesii SS02 x Trichocereus chiloensis

 

Psycho0 x Scopulicola

Luther Burbank x SS02

Sierra Blue x SS02

 

Echinopsis macrogona x Echinopsis scopulicola

Psycho0 x J2

Psycho0 x Open ‘Vishnu’

 

 

NL52509a Trichocereus, Potosi, Bolivia

NL52509a Trichocereus, Potosi, Bolivia

NL52509a Trichocereus is a cool and rare Trichocereus species from Potosi in Bolivia. Sacred Succulents Field Trip 2009! Copyright Neil Logan & Sacredsucculents.com!
As far as i know, this one was suspected to be Trichocereus validus. Personally, i think it is Trichocereus tacaquirensis but it´s hard to say just judging by those two pictures. Both plants are definitely similar and if you are interested in seeds of Trichocereus tacaquirensis, check out the new seeds I have in stock!

The plants we grew from those seeds looked 100% like a plant from the Tr. taquimbalensis group and it´s a common thing that plants related to Trichocereus taquimbalensis are labeled as Trichocereus validus. That is because Trichocereus validus probably came from Bolivia and both are probably very similar at an older age. At a younger age, that is definitely not the case.

NL52509a Trichocereus

NL52509a Trichocereus validus

Get our cool Seed & Plant List and Newsletter!

Subscribe to our Trichocereus Seed & Plant List/ Newsletter and get interesting stuff, discounts and updates to your email inbox. The Newsletter rocks! Worldwide Seed Shipping and Plants/Cuttings shipping within the EU/Germany!

Congratulations, you´ve been Trichocereusd!

You broke the internet!

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close