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Rosei 2 Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis

The Trichocereus peruvianus clones Rosei 1 & Rosei 2 are among the most interesting Trichocereus cultivars out there. Both are very glaucous with a dark blue skin. They have yellow or dark brown spines that often have black tips. The old spine growth looks very gray and the areoles are covered with very fine, white wool.

Trichocereus ‘Rosei 2’ was part of the legendary Australian Fields collection. Both Trichocereus rosei clones were brought to Australia by Harry Blossfeld, who was one of the first importers of cacti.  . Prier donated some pics of the original mother plant at Fields and I am extremely glad we have them on the site.

“Rosei 2” is certainly not a real species name and belongs into the context of Trichocereus peruvianus / Echinopsis peruviana. It is very similar to the dark blue Trichocereus peruvianus plants coming from Matucana and it´s possible that it was originally collected there. Either as seeds or as a live cutting. The spine color can be very variable and this clone is known to produce massive spines, which can be seen on some of the photos.

If you want to see more photos of Rosei 1 and Rosei 2, check out our Facebook Trichocereus group: https://facebook.com/groups/trichocereus 

Photos of Trichocereus ROSEI 2

T. peruvianus 'Rosei 2' At Fields
T. peruvianus 'Rosei 2'
t peru roseii 2
T.peru Roseii2 flower
T.peru Roseii2_1
T.peru Roseii2_3
T.peru Roseii2_4
T.peru Roseii2_1

Fields Validus (Trichocereus)

Fields Validus (Trichocereus validus)

This plant is one of the most popular and famed plants in the Australian Fields collection. This plant is a beautiful textbook specimen of the often-misunderstood species Trichocereus validus (Monviella).
It is still unknown from where Robert Fields sourced his plants, but I am positive we can add some more information soon. There were two different Validus plants growing at the (now defunct) Fields collection and I was lucky enough to get some photos of both plants by SAB member Terrapin! (Thanks again, mate! :-D)

If you want to learn more about the species Trichocerus validus, check out the page about it here: Trichocereus validus

 

Fields Validus Trichocereus Garden

 

Fields Validus SHED

Here is another plant that was growing at the Fields collection. Those photos came from Terrapin as well and I am happy to have them around:

Fields Validus Trichocereus Shed

Fields Validus 3 Terrapin Garden

Fields Validus 2 Terrapin Garden

 

Here are some photos showing the Fields Validus clones being grown by other Australian members;

 

Fields Validus Jordan 2
Photos: Jordan Calleija
Fields Validus Jordan

AppleMark

Trichocereus.com.au

Tr. validus Getafix 2
Member GETAFIXTr. validus Getafix 3

Trichocereus validus from Shed and Garden (Jon Nichols)

03_2015-10-10-16-42-03

garden-trichocereus-validus-fields-2
garden-trichocereus-validus-fields

Trichocereus ‘Yowie’ (Echinopsis)

Trichocereus ‘Yowie’ (Echinopsis)

Yowie is an Australian Trichocereus clone that came from the Fields collected. It probably came to Australia during one of the first expeditions by Harry Blossfeld, who funded his trips by selling plants to cactus collectors.

t pach yowie

t pach yowie spines

Yowie is a very cool and popular Trichocereus with a unique spination that consists of two parallel Spines per Areole. It also has very pronounced ribs and looks very much like an Ecuadorian Trichocereus pachanoi. Now let me add some information about where this clone came from.

This clone originated in Yarrawonga Victoria. The SAB member Marsha (who was previously known by the username “Yowie” led PD to the Fields collection, where the mother plant of this clone grew.  The clone is easily recognized by the pair of spines, that makes it very different from other clones that belong to this species. However, similar plants can be found all across Australia (and the world), so it´s not really sure if it is actually a clone or just represents a local type.  I know similar (and almost identical) Pachanois, especially from Ecuador and it may be very well possible that they are not genetically identical to the Yowie clone. If you encounter similar plants, you can just test it by trying to breed it with a verified Yowie. If you are not sure about the ID of your plant, feel free to post in on SAB or our Trichocereus Facebook Group!

 

t pach yowie 1

T.pachanoi 'Yowie' At Fields

Pic: Prier

Trichocereus Pachanoi Yowie_1

Trichocereus Pachanoi Yowie_2

Trichocereus Pachanoi Yowie_3

zed yowie flowers

Pic: Gus Freeman

zed yowie

Yowie 2 Yowie

Yowie

If you enjoyed this article about the Trichocereus clone Yowie, have a look at our other articles on Trichocereus species. For example Trichocereus chiloensis, Trichocereus deserticolus or the PC Trichocereus clone

We also have a kickass Tricho group on Facebook and you are welcome to join us: https://facebook.com/groups/trichocereus

Fields Macrogonus (Trichocereus macrogonus -Echinopsis macrogona)

Trichocereus macrogonus ‘Fields’, also known as Fields Macrogonus is a Trichocereus that was originally part of the legendary Fields collection in Australia. The collection was founded in the early days of cactus collecting. Most of the plants from Fields, including the Fields Macro, were brought to Australia through Harry Blossfeld´s South America expedition. This was long before all the import restrictions on plants and cacti were put in place. The garden is now owned by Robert Fields, who took over the garden from his father, the person who began with the collection. 

Now back to the history of the Fields Macro. Harry Blossfeld, who was a field botanist, offered some cactus shares to finance his 1935 South America Expedition and Mr. Field was one of the people who took the chance to invest in it. In return, he received some very cool cacti that grew in what is known as the “Field´s Collection”. In addition, Mr. Field seems to have bought some plants or seeds from Friedrich Ritter, because some of their plants were (at least officially) discovered by Ritter, such as Trichocereus knuthianus.

This Fields Macro, also known as Trichocereus macrogonus ‘Fields’,  is one of the oldest confirmed specimens of Trichocereus macrogonus that are labeled as such. Of course there are still plants around from the early days of cactus taxonomy, but the majority of them have lost their labels. 

At the time of the expeditions, Britton and Rose had just described their Trichocereus species Trichocereus pachanoi, Trichocereus bridgesii and Trichocereus peruvianus and Trichocereus macrogonus was still a very well known species, even more well-known than Trichocereus peruvianus. 

There are a lot of plants labeled Trichocereus macrogonus on the market today, but the great confusion surrounding the name makes it very hard to differentiate between the ones that were originally called Trichocereus macrogonus and the ones that modern nurseries or seed collectors just identified themselves. On the commercial seed market, you can get all kinds of different species under the name Trichocereus macrogonus and plants from the commercial market are generally unfit to be used as standard for Trichocereus macrogonus.

Most Trichocereus macrogonus strains from Peru usually fall into the species Trichocereus peruvianus, which is why I think both names are at least partially synonymous.

In addition, the original description of T.macrogonus was very incomplete. There is no country of origin, no good photos from the earliest examples of Cereus macrogonus, no Herbarium specimen, no early flower description etc.  

From the time when Britton and Rose described T. peruvianus, the original Trichocereus macrogonus was never found again and today no one really knows which plant was originally described in the description. And because of that, an early example of Trichocereus macrogonus that goes back to the 1930s is a great thing! If you are interested in the history of Trichocereus Macrogonus, check out my article here:

Trichocereus macrogonus / Echinopsis macrogona

Personally, I think the Fields Macrogonus looks very much like a Matucana Peruvianus such as Icaro DNA or Los Gentiles. This particular form of Trichocereus peruvianus has brown spines and is very close to the overall description of Cereus peruvianus.  

Pictures: By Rodni! Thank you very much!

Photos of FIELDS MACROGONUS

Trichocereus Macrogonus Fields 4

Fields Macrogonus

Trichocereus Macrogonus Fields Echinopsis macrogona 2
Fields Macrogonus

Trichocereus Macrogonus Fields Flower 3

Trichocereus Macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Fields Flower 2

Trichocereus Macrogonus Fields Flower

Trichocereus Macrogonus Fields
Fields Macrogonus

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ROSEI 1 (Trichocereus peruvianus) Fields

Both Rosei 1 and Rosei 2 are among the most popular clones in the Trichocereus community. Just like so many great plants, they originated from the Fields collection in Victoria. The name was used in very old cactus literature to label a certain, very blue types of Trichocereus peruvianus / Echinopsis peruviana. This name was mostly applied to the same plants that we label as Trichocereus macrogonus today. The name is mostly synonymous with certain forms of Trichocereus peruvianus.

The name Trichocereus rosei was never an officially described species and that´s why we count both Rosei clones as commercial varieties. Both clones are part of the Fields collection and came to Australia in the early days of cactus trading. Mr. Fields was one of the supporters of Harry Blossfeld´s South America expedition and got the plants as reward for the support.

Despite the fact that Rosei 1 and Rosei 2 are actually clones, you can find very similar specimens in nature. In particular, we see a striking resemblance to the forms of Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana (e.g. the Icaro DNA strain, Sharxx Blue etc).  However, there are also similar plants in other parts of Peru and we probably won’t be able to find out where exactly they came from. In the future, I will have a look at old cactus catalogs to see if there might be some old seed lists that include the collection sites. The only information that is certain is that both clones are from South America, but that´s a pretty big area.

Rosei 1 has shorter spines than Rosei 2 and usually has a more glaucous/blue epidermis. But because the environment can have a huge influence on the look of a plant, I doubt that this works reliably.

Photos of ROSEI 1 Trichocereus peruvianus

T. peruvianus 'Rosei 1'

T. peruvianus 'Rosei 1'

T.peru Roseii1 Flower_1

T.peru Roseii1 Flower_2

T.peru Roseii1 Flower_2

T.peru Roseii 1_1

Rosei 1 Open (2).JPG

This is a Hybrid between Rosei 1 x Open

Rosei 1 Open (3).JPG

Rosei 1 Open (1).JPG

Another plant from a ROSEI 1 x OPEN cross

Rosei 1 Open (4)

Roseii 1 x Pach (2)

Rosei 1 x Pachanoi

Roseii 1 x Pach (1)

T. peruvianus 'Rosei 1'

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