Tag: Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus cuzcoensis – Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus cuzcoensis – Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus cuzcoensis is a Trichocereus species from Cusco in Peru. It is described as from Cusco and in sense  of the description plants only count as being part of this species if they are from Cusco, but close relatives of Trichocereus cuzcoensis also occur in many other parts of Peru, e.g. Trichocereus knuthianus, Trichocereus schoenii, Trichocereus tarmaensis, etc.

Trichocereus cuzcoensis is currently still called Echinopsis cuzcoensis, but many good authors have abandoned this sinking ship and went back to use the Trichocereus names. Trichocereus cuzcoensis, also known as Echinopsis cuzcoensis, is an accepted species, despite it´s obvious similarity to Trichocereus peruvianus. There are countless intermediates between Trichocereus peruvianus and Trichocereus cuzcoensis (especially where both grow together) and there are many regional forms that show traits of both species.  As an example, there are Peruvianoid forms of Trichocereus cuzcoensis and there are specimens of Trichocereus peruvianus that show some traits of Trichocereus cuzcoensis. Personally, I think that Trichocereus cuzcoensis and Trichocereus peruvianus are so similar that they are at least subspecies or varieties of the same species. We´ve already seen lots of different regional forms of Trichocereus cuzcoensis. Everywhere T.cuzcoensis grows in direct neighborhood of Trichocereus peruvianus, they hybridize with each other and form transitional forms. The whole group around Trichocereus peruvianus is extremely variable and that also includes Trichocereus cuzcoensis as well. Please note that Trichocereus cuzcoensis is MORE than just Karel Knize´s KK242, which has become THE textbook definition of a cuzco. The hate around KK242 is responsible for giving the species a bad rep and that´s absolutely not justified as far as we are concerned. It´s a beautiful and unique species and large mother plants are usually stunning.

Because there are countless forms of Trichocereus cuzcoensis or its close relatives, we started collecting as many photos as we can to put them here together. 

Description of T. cuzcoensis:

Trichocereus Cuzcoensis is a columnar cactus that grows columnar and is pupping from the base. It can get more than five meters tall, though most collection plants that are grown in pots do not exceed 2 meters. However, in countries like Australia, there are many huge plants of Trichocereus cuzcoensis to be found. New growth has a bright green color. It can get between 7 -9 rounded Ribs and the areoles are approximately 1-2 centimeters apart from each other. Trichocereus cuzcoensis has many, very strong spines. The number of spines is very variable but in most cases, I observed between 8-12 spines. The spines usually have a rounded, knobby base. New spine growth is yellow or dark brown while old spine growth is usually dark gray to white with slight black undertones or black spine tips. The spines usually are between 5-10 centimeters long. If you have a suspected E.cuzcoensis with a low rib count, it is likely not a Cuzco but a close relative such as the plants from San Marcos, T. schoenii, T. santaensis, etc.

Trichocereus cuzcoensis is a night-flowering species but the flowers usually stay fresh until the morning of the next day. It is self-sterile and you need another specimen as pollen donor in order to produce seed.

Flower:

The flower color is white and the flower is usually very large. It measures up to 16 centimeters, the tube is green and 7-8 centimeters long. Petals are approximately 5 centimeters long and there are hairs covering the flower.

Type locality:

Peru, Cuzco. Cuzcoensis relatives from other areas do not count as T.cuzcoensis is the sense of the description.

Synonyms, commercial names & Varieties:

Trichocereus knuthianus, Trichocereus crassiarboreus, Cereus cuzcoensis, KK242, KK340, KK1911 Knuthianus, Trichocereus tarmaensis. Please note that some of these are close relatives that we count in the winder context of this species.

Cultivation:

Trichocereus Cuzcoensis is grown just like other Trichocereus species. It´s a very tough and frost hardy species and is able to cope with temperatures down to -9° celsius/15.8° Fahrenheit for short periods of time. The minimum average temperature is 10° celsius/50° fahrenheit. That temperature is also the minimum temperature that it needs to stay healthy during the winter.

Winter protection:

Trichocereus cuzcoensis can be overwintered in a bright and well ventilated place. The temperature should be around 9-10° Celsius and the plants need to be completely dry. In european countries, the growers stop giving water and fertilizer in late summer (September or October) and take em in until early May or April. Keeping the plants dry and cold over winter also helps to increase flower production. Plants that are kept in a warm room over the winter lose their ability to flower. Besides, plants or seedlings need to be watered on a regular basis as soon as you have them in a heated room. If you want to overwinter a Trichocereus in a warm room (20°-30° Celsius), you have to water it on a regular basis. You can only overwinter a plant “dry” if the temperatures are low.

Growing Trichocereus cuzcoensis from seed: Trichocereus cuzcoensis is very easy from seed, because it is relatively resistant to most pests. One of the biggest challenges is to get good quality seed because most cuzcoensis seed on the market is pretty old and some do not even germinate. I am constantly looking for interesting new types of Trichocereus cuzcoensis, because they are amazing plants. Take a look at the pics from the Sacred Succulents Field Trips that are labeled “Cuzcoensis” and you will most likely agree. Germination temperature for Trichocereus cuzcoensis is between 26° and 30° celsius. It only needs very little water to induce germinations and if you have quality seed, they will germinate within 2-6 weeks. If nothing shows up by the 6th week, you will probably not get germinations at all. In this case, remove the lid, let the soil dry out and start with the germination process again. Those cycles mimic the way this actually happens in nature and sometimes, you will be able to re-activate dead seed. You can also add GA-3, which is Gibberelic Acid or use a strong HPS or LED lamp to wake the seeds up, because ultraviolet light increases germination rates. In general, Trichocereus seeds need light to germinate, so do not cover them with soil.

Trichocereus cuzcoensis Seed Sources: I have some great seeds in my shop right now. The first one comes from Huancavelica in Peru and the other one is somewhere between Trichocereus peruvianus and Trichocereus cuzcoensis.

Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 Master Evan EchinopsisThis looks like a very typical Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242. This strain was originally brought into cultivation by Karel Knize. He also sold various types of similar plants labeled as Trichocereus cuzcoensis, Trichocereus macrogonus or Trichocereus peruvianus. The label KK242 does not refer to a particular plant but the area where the seeds/cuttings were collected at. Because of that, there are many plants labeled KK242 which are NOT a Trichocereus cuzcoensis. The type just looks so unique and remarkable that it stuck and most plants that look like this are usually identified as KK242. Which is not really correct because that´s just one of the many types that grow within the KK242 range. However, most of the KK242 are in fact Trichocereus cuzcoensis. Pic: Master Evan

Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 Echinopsis cuzcoensisAnother KK242

Below: A form of KK242 that is not a Trichocereus cuzcoensis.

Trichocereus Cuzcoensis KK242 Rio Lurin_J33_2_jpg

One of the many faces of KK242. Copyright K.Trout

3 Trichocereus cuzcoensis, Lamay, Cusco, Peru 2010 copyright B

Ben Kamm

Copyright: Ben Kamm, Sacred Succulents

Also check out this posting with many cool Cuzcos fom the Sacredsucculents Field Trips!

Trichocereus cuzcoensis Echinopsis cuzcoensis Nitrogen

Nitrogen

Trichocereus cuzcoensis - Echinopsis cuzcoensis Nitrogen

Nitrogen

Trichocereus cuzcoensis Echinopsis cuzcoensis Delia Kisar Delia Kisar Trichocereus cuzcoensis Echinopsis cuzcoensis Delia Kisar

Trichocereus cuzcoensis Rodni Kisar

Rodni Kisar

Trichocereus cuzcoensis Echinopsis cuzcoensisTrichocereus cuzcoensis Echinopsis cuzcoensis 3

Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 Echinopsis cuzcoensis

KK242 Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 Echinopsis cuzcoensis

Trichocereus santaensis / Echinopsis santaensis descriptions

Trichocereus santaensis / Echinopsis santaensis descriptions

Trichocereus santaensis is columnar cactus and species described by Curt Backeberg and Werner Rauh. It is endemic to the Santa Valley in Peru. There are many different forms that belong into the larger context of T. santaensis, e.g. Trichocereus sp. Chavin de Huantar also known as El Lanzon, Trichocereus huanucoensis, Trichocereus pallarensis and many others.

Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar Echinopsis Chavin Herbalists

Echinopsis santaensis Trichocereus santaensis Rio Santa Peru Valley

Origin of Trichocereus santaensis

Northern Peru, the valley around the Rio Santa, Puente, Bedoya, Huayanca

Can be kept apart from Trichocereus cuzcoensis by the absence of swollen spine bases. It also has a more frosted blue skin color, has fewer spines and shorter middle spines. Unlike Trichocereus peruvianus, it grows always columnar and does not grow prostrate.

trichocereus santaensis Huntington Botanical Garden Echinopsis santaensis HBGTrichocereus Santaensis – Huntington Botanical Garden – by Richard Hipp!

Description of Trichocereus santaensis Rauh & backb g -. Descr. Cact. Nov. 20, 1956

Trichocereus santaensis can get up to five meters high and branches from the bottom. The stems are blue-green to a glaucous green. It has 7-9 ribs that are similarly broad than the ones on Trichocereus knuthianus aka Echinopsis knuthiana. There is a distinct furrow above the areoles. This distinct V-Notch is very strong in young pups. The areoles have a diameter of approximately 1 centimeter and Trichocereus santaensis has between 1-3 radial spines. Spines medium long to short. In addition, Trichocereus santaensis has one very long middle spine, which is up to 5 centimeters long.

Flower: The flower is white and gets up to 22 centimeters in length. It has a similar flower than other San Pedro types, which is another indicator that Trichocereus santaensis is just a regional form of another species, e.g. T. pachanoi or T. peruvianus.

Origin/Habitat: Rio Santa, Puente, Huayacana, Bedoya.

Trichocereus santaensis is very similar to Trichocereus cuzcoensis and is constantly confused with it. However, it does NOT have rounded, knobby spine basesBesides, the spination is less strong and grows always columnar instead of creeping. Today, the species would probably not be considered to be correct and extensive DNA testing is necessary to look into the limits of this species and where other species begin.

Please note that T. santaensis is very variable due to the high number of regional forms. Some of which have red spines, some with yellow spines and some where the spines are completely absent.

trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Rio Santa

 

In the Chapter of Trichocereus peruvianus, Backeberg wrote about its growth type:

I even found the Type initially growing erect, then lying or hanging . But near Matucana (Sic!), there also are upright growing varities of Trichocereus santaensis, which probably weren´t recognized as a seperate species.
The identification of these species with Tr. macrogonus (KKDE., 20, 1941) i cannot agree with. 
However, I definitely think that some of the more spiny forms of T. santaensis could´ve been the lost T. macrogonus. Some of them are extremely spiny.
 trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis backeberg Echinopsis cactus
This is Backebergs Key for Trichocereus santaensis
Branches to 10 cm
Blue green shoots
Ribs 7, very broad, strongly furrowed,
Not flattened furrows
Spines gray-brown, brighter towards the base
Middle spines:
1 spine is longer, spines up to 4 cm long

Friedrich Ritter´s description of Trichocereus santaensis

Trichocereus SANTAENSIS RAUH & BACKBG. 1956 RAUH: BEITRÄGE PERUANISCHER KAKTEENVEGETATION
1958, s. 361
Differences from TR. Pachanoi (data for the latter in parentheses):
Body gray-green (grass green to bluish green). Ri. 6-7, usually 6 (5-8, in
Peru medium to 10 and even higher), on the Areoles a slight v-shaped
Notch (little cross notch). Ar. 3-5 mm Dm
Spines: few or absent,Rsp. to 3, a few mm to 3 cm long,
Middle Spines. usually one, often it is the only Spine, a few mm to 4 cm long.
Flower. Near the apex, about 18-19 cm long, about 12 cm wide open (up to 20 cm wide between the
outer petals), obliquely upward (about protruding horizontally), just
(with two slight curves). Nectar Chamber 19 mm long (slightly longer), without
significant gap (small space), with little or no
Nectar (with some nectar). Tube about ca 6 cm long with 2.5 cm further
Opening (longer and wider). Petals slightly shorter and narrower, the outer
almost adjacent to the interior Ones (strongly bent outwards),
SANTA Valley at 2000 m and about Depart. Ancash; only here. No. FR 567a.
Fig. 1,188,


Trichocereus santaensis Friedrich Ritter Echinopsis santaensis

Trichocereus santaensis / Echinopsis santaensis at the Rio Santa (Riley Flatten)

Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Rio Santa Riley FlattenTrichocereus santaensis Rio Santa Santa Valley Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten

Echinopsis santaensis Trichocereus santaensis Rio Santa Riley Flatten

Photos below Trichocereus santaensis / Echinopsis santaensis in Chavin de Huantar, El Lanzon (Riley Flatten)

Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley FlattenPhoto Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 2Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 3Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 4Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenPhoto Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 2Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenPhotos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 22Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 3Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 4El Lanzon Photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenCactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenCactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenCactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 3Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 2Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 5Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de HuantarTrichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 2Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 3Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 4Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 5

 

Trichocereus sp. ‘Isla del Sol’ (Echinopsis)

Trichocereus sp. ‘Isla del Sol’ (Echinopsis)

This population from the Bolivian island ‘Isla Del Sol’ belongs into the distant complex of Trichocereus bridgesii / Echinopsis lageniformis. However, it is currently discussed whether or not this plant is actually a different species and DNA testing is required to look into its status.  Sacred Succulents visited this population during their Field Trips and made some amazing photos. I also have some sick photos of it in my first book.

 

BK08601.1 Trichocereus Isla del Sol, Bolivia

Now, this is one of the most interesting Trichocereus species that were visited during the Sacred Succulents Field Trips! All the photos shown here are from Ben Kamm & Sacredsucculents.com! This was from the 2008 Field Trip and it is very similar to an intermediate between Trichocereus bridgesii and something from the Trichocereus cuzcoensis complex. Trichocereus cuzcoensis is mostly known for the plants in Cusco that were used to write the original description, but there are similar plants and relatives of Trichocereus cuzcoensis that can be found in other Peruvian states.

It also reminds me a little bit of Trichocereus knuthianus, which also belongs to the Cuzcoensis complex and has similar, massive areoles. Those plants are definitely very old…how they evolved exactly is not known.
Sacred Succulents gave away seed of this amazing species in 2008, but I do not know of anyone who raised some of them so far. If you happen to own this type, please let me know because it´s on my most-wanted list and I urgently need more pics of seed grown plants. The Isla Del Sol is an area that can be found in the southern part of the Lake Titicaca in Bolivia. It´s a wonderful area that is filled with ancient ruins and that screams “History”. I do not know if those plants were intentionally planted there or if they just evolved, but it´s definitely one of the coolest Trichocereus species out there.

Isla Del Sol in Bolivia

193 BK08601.1 Trichocereus Isla del Sol, BoliviaCopyright: Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com

192 BK08601

BK08601.2 Trichocereus Isla del Sol, Bolivia

This is another Plant from the same region. Judging by the looks of it, it grows very nearby. The Plant is somehow connected to the Trichocereus cuzcoensis Complex and is simply awesome!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

195 BK08601

Chavín de Huántar: Trichocereus santaensis & El Lanzon

Chavín de Huántar: Trichocereus santaensis & El Lanzon

Chavín de Huántar is an archaeological site in Peru with a long history of Trichocereus cultivation. There are plants that can be found within the ruins and those plants probably go back for many thousands of years. The ruins are thought to be from 1200BC and the age of this complex is energetically discussed among archaeologists.

This legendary place is located in the Ancash area and holds great religious as well as historic significance, which is why the center was in the midst of the Chavin culture. It is located near the important Peruvian city Lima and lies at the confluence of two large rivers: The Rio Mosnar and the Huanchecsa river. The Trichocereus strains from this area have a huge botanic variability and the area is home to a large number of different plants and Trichocereus species.

Chavín_de_Huántar Sharon odbPhoto: Sharon ODB

Peru Map Trichocereus Chavin Santa Valley santaensisMap: Urutseg

Photos from the Sacred Succulents Field Trips. Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com. 

Trichocereus sp, Chavindehuantar, Ancash, Peru 

The regional form known from this area is probably somewhere between Trichocereus cuzcoensis and Trichocereus peruvianus. We saw plants that clearly belonged into the Trichocereus santaensis group as well as other weird plants…some of which even look like Trichocereus huanucoensis.

 

Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 

Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru  2

Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 3 Echinopsis santaensis

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru

Another great Specimen from the Ancash Region in Peru.

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 1

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 3

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 1

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 2

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru Tillandsia Echinopsis santaensis

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 3

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 1

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 2

El Lanzon Trichocereus :

This legendary photo is made by Aplantis.net:

Trichocereus El Lanzon Echinopsis santaensis Trichocereus santaensis peruvianus

Photo: Aplantis.net

This plant has a great history and most people who visit the area can´t go by without taking loads of photos. It´s one of my most favorite plants.

Trichocereus chavin de huantar Peru El Lanzon

Those plants were posted by ChavinHerbalist. They are trying to preserve the genetics and posted some amazing photos on Facebook. Check them out!

AD002 Chavin Herbalist Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis

Trichocereus Chavin Seedling cactus Trichocereus santaensis

Photos below Trichocereus santaensis / Echinopsis santaensis in Chavin de Huantar, El Lanzon (Riley Flatten)

Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley FlattenPhoto Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 2Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 3Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 4Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenPhoto Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 2Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenPhotos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 22Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 3Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 4El Lanzon Photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenCactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenCactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenCactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 3Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 2Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 5Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de HuantarTrichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 2Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 3Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 4Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 5

 

Trichocereus puquiensis / Echinopsis puquiensis

Trichocereus puquiensis / Echinopsis puquiensis

The species Trichocereus puquiensis, also known as Echinopsis puquiensis, was described by Rauh & Backeberg as Trichocereus puquiensis Rauh et Backeberg nov. spec.. The description was originally published in DESCR. CACT. NOV. vol. 20 in 1956.

Depending on who you ask, there is a constant debate about whether or not this species is a “good name”. Anderson included it in his Cactus Lexicon as Echinopsis peruvianus ssp. puquiensis. Personally, I think that this plant is closer to Trichocereus pachanoi than it is to Trichocereus peruvianus. On the other hand, I also think that Tr. pachanoi and Tr. peruvianus are probably a very large and variable species with many intermediates between the two and I would not mind to throw Tr. puquiensis in there as well. The rib structure and areole shape of Tr. puquiensis is similar to the one on Tr. pachanoi. The big difference is that Tr. puquiensis has 8 – 11 ribs and a strong groove above the aroles. Please note that there are many different types from the Puquio region, what is the cause for the large number of different plants that go by this name.

Trichocereus Puquiensis gets up to 4 meters tall, but most plants are around 2 meters. It pups from the base and grows as columnar shoots, growing upwards. Tr. puquiensis has no cuzcoensis-ribs but a very similar spination. Think of it as a 8 – 11 ribbed Pachanoi with long cuzco spines that lack the typical cuzcoensis swollen spine bases. This is another giveaway that helps you to ID it.
The color of the epidermis is blue/green. It reaches a maximum diameter of 10-20 centimeters with ribs that are between 1-2 centimeters high, the areoles are 1-2 centimeter in diameter and felted, similar to the areoles on Trichocereus cuzcoensis.
Trichocereus puquiensis has 10-12 radial spines that are up to 2,5 centimeters long. The new spine growth of the radial spines is brown. It also has 1-2 long middle spines, of which one or two are pointing upwards. Those middle spines are 8-12 centimeters long. New spine growth is brown and old spine growth is gray, very similar to the one on Tr. cuzcoensis. You see it´s not a typical Pachanoi but a intermediate that involves traits of various species. Please note that there are some plants in the Puquio habitat that are in fact cuzcoensis related, and the Trichocereus puquiensis from Karel Knize is actually one of them.

Flowers: The flowers are 15-22 centimeters large and white. A typical San Pedro flower. The tube is up to 2.5 centimeters thick and hairy.

Fruit: Unkown. Probably similar to Pachanoi or cuzcoensis fruits.

Habitat: Puquio, Department Ayacucho and it only occurs there. It grows in neighborhood of Erdisia Quadringularis. Rauh assigned the collection number K119.

This is Rauh´s original, latin description, which slightly differs from mine.

Planta 3-4 m alta, a basi ramosa; caules columniformes glauci, 8-10 costati usque 15 cm crassi: costae angustae, ca- 1,5 cm altae; areolae 1cm in dia. lutei-brunnescenti-tomentosae, aculeis marginalibus ca. 10 usque 2cm longis, in calulibus hornis brunneis;aculei centrales plerumque 2, quorum superior oblique erectus vel transverse patents, usque 10 cm longus, basalis oblique deflexus 5-8 cm longus, in caule hornio badius, senectute canus; flores usque 15 cm longi, tubus floralis etiam in statu ante efflorationem rectus, usque 2cm crassus, squamis bractaeneis dense obtectus, quarum pars libera late trigona, in apicem obscurum excurrens, in axillis earum pili lanei brunneo-atri; phylla perigonii exteriora subtus basi rubiginosa, supra virescentia, interiora alba, filamenta, stylus et stigmata virescentia, radii stigmatis 19, ca. 5mm longi, cavum ovarii ferequadrangulare, 0,7cm in dia., nectarium 1,5 cm. longum, angustissimum, stylo crasso fere omnino expletum; fructus ignoti.

Friedrich Ritter sold Seed labeled as FR 155b. Ritter said that the Species would rather resemble Trichocereus pachanoi than Trichocereus cuzcoensis and I tend to agree. The species is limited to the pacific part of the Andes, while Tr. Cuzcoensis grows on the Atlantic Part. After years of investigating I finally think that Ritter was probably right, what means that Tr. puquiensis is more on the Pachanoi end of the spectrum. He knew the South American cacti better than everyone else, but during that time, many regional varieties were described as species and most of them did not age well and ended up being merged into Tr. peruvianus or Tr. pachanoi. I thought about this species a lot, and I guess there are plants that have traits of more than one species.

Karel Knize sold seeds & plants under that name too. Knize´s Trichocereus puquiensis is extremely close to Trichocereus cuzcoensis, but has a couple more ribs than a standard cuzcoensis.  Apart from that, the ribs are clearly Pachanoi ribs. I´ve seen plants with five ribs and some with ten.

Every time you come across a plant with more ribs than usual, Trichocereus puquiensis should be a considered option. It also does not have rounded spine basis, what clearly differentiates it from Trichocereus cuzcoensis. Knize´s version is becoming more and more common because Karel Knize sold large amounts of seed and plants in the past years.

Cultivation of Trichocereus puquiensis:

There is very few information about frost tolerance of Trichocereus puquiensis available. It should be grown like a standard Trichocereus pachanoi or peruvianus, because it´s general growth type is similar to that. It can tolerate frost but temperatures should not be lower than -5° to -10° celsius. Plants should be kept totally dry over winter.

Buy seeds or plants of Trichocereus puqiensis: 

You can buy seeds of Trichocereus puquiensis in my shop.

In the USA, I know of one supplier that grows the genuine Tr. puquiensis from Rauh & Backeberg´s description. Cactusaffinity.com! In Australia you can get live cuttings from the SAB shop.

large-prod-2070940-SAB_EchPeruPuquiensisKK1689

Photo: Shaman-Australis.com

This is KK1689:

t peru puquensis KK1689

t peru puquensis KK1689 1

This Pic is from Backeberg´s description:

trichocereus puquiensis005

Trichocereus puquiensis Echinopsis puquiensis

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