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The history of the PC Trichocereus clone – Predominant cultivar

I wanted to clarify some things about the PC Trichocereus clone and the differences to classic Trichocereus pachanoi. What it is, where it probably is from and what it isnt. The name is probably the most overused name in the history of Trichocereus culture. I personally hate it and spent days discussing the whole situation with friends or interested people in the Trichocereus Facebook group. If you hear the word PC in a Trichocereus group, JUST RUN. Log off, go outside and be in your garden. Still, if you actually wonder what those guys are actually talking about, I am happy to shed some light on this issue. Please keep in mind that I hate to use the name of this cultivar, strain or whatever you might want to call it and I will only mention this one time and one time only.

What does PC Trichocereus stands for? It originally means PREDOMINATE CULTIVAR. However, PREDOMINANT CULTIVAR would probably be more appropriate.

PC Trichocereus pachanoi

Photo: moonunitbotanica.com / PC Trichocereus in Australia

Forest & Kim Starr_070320-5800_Echinopsis_pachanoi

PC Trichocereus in a garden. Photo: Forest & Kim Starr

Now what is it really and is this all BS?

It is a clone, but there also are other plants grown from seeds that are probably coming from the same site this clone is coming from too. In California and parts of the USA, this clone is really common around parks, schools or gardens. The exact origin of PC Pachanoi (like many call it) is unclear. However, it is very similar to a collection made by Friedrich Ritter, which he later described as Trichocereus riomizquensis. Since there are so few photos available this will be hard to verify. In my opinion the PC Trichocereus clone needs DNA testing and everything else is speculation. Personally, I don´t give a shit. This is not my clone, and I did not have any connection with the naming of it. The person who somewhat described it was Michael S. Smith on the SAB forum. His opinion about PC was that it was VERY similar to Ritter´s population from Rio Mizque and the seed grown plants from NMCR. The photos of those can be find on SAB, so make sure to check them out.

Two things are certain about PC Trichocereus. One, it is VERY similar to spineless or short spine versions of Trichocereus bridgesii. Two, it is so different from actual Trichocereus pachanoi that every Noob can easily identify it after a few months of reading. There must be a reason for the fact that it is so different to classic Trichocereus pachanoi. Whether it is a hybrid or a short spined form of Trichocereus bridgesii is impossible to verify without DNA testing. And one thing should be clear by now; I the author don´t care enough to investigate. Anyone that wants to jump face forward into the subject and fund a DNA test be my guest. More power to you my friend. Just know that the discussion around this clone will always be on Kindergarten level, no matter what the outcome is. It is the Trichocereus version of “but her emails”. Facts or actual knowledge do not matter and too many people who have no experience with the lesser known Trichocereus species love to shout their opinion at anyone that doesn’t agree.

Now that we got that out of the way, here are some more infos and a more thorough description of PC and similar plants.

Trichocereus riomizqzensis FR865

Trichocereus Riomizquensis 335

This is the original photo from Ritter´s book. Do you see the white hairs on the flower and the way the areoles look? Like, the sawtooth ribs and the absent spines? Well, keep in mind. You will need it later. Ritters official collection name of this plant was Trichocereus riomizquensis FR856 and they originally comes from Chyllas.

The original site is the Rio Mizque and we and my friends from Sacred Succulents visited the original site a couple of times.  It is extremely similar to Trichocereus pachanoi, but differs in substantial points like the hairs on the flowers and the overall rib structure. Though it is common belief that the San Pedro cactus aka Trichocereus pachanoi grows in Bolivia, all the San Pedro related plants we ever came across IN THE WILD either belonged to Trichocereus bridgesii or Trichocereus scopulicola. That also applies to the regional type from the Rio Mizque. I have all kinds of photos of those plants on the pages about Trichocereus riomizquensis and I don´t want to repeat this information here again.
This is a long-spined version of this but there also are a lot of short-spined ones on that site. I seen them. Just like this PC Trichocereus, they have 6-7 ribs, those weird areoles and golden spines without swollen spine bases. Overall, they are just a short-spined version of Trichocereus bridgesii. In addition to the short spined versions, there are also MANY versions with longer spines at this site and they are basically indistinguishable from Trichocereus bridgesii. In my opinion they probably ARE Trichocereus bridgesii varieties. People often like to compare the Ritter clone FR865 (look at the photos again) to spiny Trichocereus bridgesii that Sacred Succulents collected and labeled Trichocereus bridgesii during their field trip. Again, some of those probably were treated as local populations of Trichocereus bridgesii, so it´s kinda unfair to make a comparison between the spineless plant that was originally described as Trichocereus riomizquensis to basically a random local population of Trichocereus bridgesii. All of these plants CLEARLY belong to Trichocereus bridgesii in the greater context (even the spineless collection), but Ritter´s plant was clearly not the same clone or type of plant as the spiny Bridgesoids that also grow in that area. That plant is clearly photographed in his original photo, and the fact that it looks nothing like some of the spiny collections from the area should instantly end all comparisons. There are spineless AND spiny versions of Trichocereus peruvianus, so it shouldn´t come as a surprise that it might be similar with Trichocereus riomizquensis.

Trichocereus 340 BK10512

Drought Resistance and Hardiness

Let me just say that one thing that all Bolivian Trichocereus species have in common is their drought resistance. They literally live in a hot desert and are a lot more resistant to drought than Trichocereus pachanoi or some of the other Peruvian San Pedros. And that’s where I want to draw the line directly to this Californian clone. Clones & cultivars are not humbug or bullshit….cultivars exist in EVERY field of commercial cultivation and everyone who tells you different is a fool. One such cultivar is the infamous PREDOMINANT CULTIVAR, which is extremely drought resistant and manages to thrive in the California climate too. This clone is so present in that area that it´s probably the most common Trichocereus. We tested it numerous times…almost none of those Californian plants were able to mate with each other…simply because they were genetically identical and cuttings of each other. I seen whole nurseries filled up with PC because they are so damn easy to grow. They just cut them in small pieces and stick them into the ground. And after five years, they sell it for 30-100 bucks. All those plants share the same flower characteristics and are closer to Trichocereus bridgesii than they are to Trichocereus pachanoi. They are covered with white hairs, which is absolutely typical for Trichocereus bridgesii. I know a Bolivian Trichocereus species when I see one…and this Trichocereus PC is one without a doubt.

The flowers of PC Trichocereus:

PC Flower_7

Do you see all those white hairs? Good, because it’s important to differentiate between certain Trichocereus species. Trichocereus pachanoi tends to have black or brown hairs, while this one has whitish hairs on top of a black or brown base. And that’s typical for some Bolivian San Pedro strains, e.g Trichocereus scopulicola.

One common argument that I often hear from people with an agenda is that the white hairs on PC and Trichocereus scopulicola are just white because they are stained by the sun. I find that argument insulting, simply because there are so many photos that prove that there is a visible tendency for whiter(!) hairs on some Bolivian species when the buds/flowers are originally formed. OF COURSE THE SUN BLEACHES THE HAIRS ON THE FLOWERS OF ALL TRICHOCEREUS SPECIES. The sun bleaches everything including the hairs of all living things if you expose them to it, but it should be pretty obvious that there are wild differences in hair coloration in the genus Trichocereus when they are originally formed. Later on, the hair color of all species is under constant attack by the strong sunlight and bleached until only the brown or black wool below remains. Most of these flowers have hairs and wool (usually around the scales on the flowers), and both are two different things. If you look at the photos it becomes clear that there´s brown wool coming out in between the scales (only a few mm long) of both PC and Trichocereus scopulicola, and the substantially longer whitish hairs (up to a couple cm long).

pcPachBudDSC_0462
A flower bud of PC Trichocereus
Scopulicola5a
A flower bud of Trichocereus scopulicola.

Those two photos are from Misplant.net! Check out their seeds because they are amazing.
Well, just compare the photos and see for yourself. The top photo is the flower bud of this PC Trichocereus and the lower one is a bud on a Trichocereus scopulicola. They are at different stages in their development, but I am sure you see the similarity in the important parts. And the same applies to the flower on Trichocereus bridgesii, which is another Bolivian Trichocereus.

Scop from Misplant.net

ID Chaos on Forums and Facebook Groups

Alright, now that we have this out of the way let me just say that discussions about PC are very common on message boards and Facebook groups. Like it is with most other things in life, people who do not have enough experience just love to identify stuff even though they should probably not. PC is among the most misidentified plants on Trichocereus groups. And this is not because it is so difficult to identify. Like I said, even a noob can identify it, IF he knows what to look for. Due to the fact that people use PC for many classic Trichocereus pachanoi, there is total chaos around what actually constitutes a PC Trichocereus or not. In pretty much every ID request involving Trichocereus pachanoi, there are people that will call it a PC. If something has spines, there´s a good chance someone will label it PC. If you know what to look for, this clone is one of the easiest ones to identify though.

Is the PREDOMINANT CULTIVAR A CLONE?

Yes, but there are also people that made crosses with it and grew offspring of it. The majority of the plants in the States is clone, but I know that there´s also a lot of offspring that´s making the rounds. Misplant alone made hundreds of crosses with this clone, and I´m sure he wasn´t the only one. All cuttings taken from the main PC clone are genetically identical.

What about sister plants / seedlings grown from the same fruit?

Regardless what it is, it is very likely that there were other plants from the same population or fruit. If it is actually Ritter´s plant from Rio Mizque in Bolivia, there are probably thousands of other seedlings grown from his seeds. It doesn´t change the fact that the majority of PCs around are one clone, but it just underlines that there might be more plants from the genetic proximity. I doubt you can differentiate the actual PC from its offspring or closely related sister plants. I´ve seen lots of seedgrown PC hybrids and they pretty much looked like the famous parent. It is a very dominant clone and in almost all crosses with it the classic PC traits came through.

Short Spined Trichocereus bridgesii from Bolivia

Here are some Bolivian T.bridgesii and Trichocereus riomizquensis with very short spines. They are still part of Trichocereus bridgesii in a wider sense, but you can see that there is a clear similarity to the PREDOMINATE CULTIVAR. Same rib structure with sawtooth ribs, correct hair color, almost no spines, same skin structure, same golden spines (unlike gray or brown on T.pachanoi) etc. Imagine them with long golden spines and you have a Trichocereus bridgesii,

Trichocereus riomizquensis
Tr. aff pachanoi in Boliva
San Pedro in Boliva
Trichocereus aff. pachanoi in Boliva

Well, okay. I want to come to and end but it´s important to make a very good point. YES, there are many San Pedros that are extremely similar to this clone. Not all of them are the same and I am sure there´s a fair amount that has absolutely nothing to do with this one. But it is absolutely proven that there IS a common clone in the USA and it is easily distinguished from typical Trichocereus pachanoi. There must be a reason for it.

Nurseries wanna make money and will replicate everything they have a market for. And those Bolivian Trichos or similar plants (as in PC) are tough like hell. You literally stick them in the ground and they grow. And that played a part in the fact that this Trichocereus strain became wildly common in some parts of the USA.

Alright, I want to sum this up. Everyone is a bit in the right here. The way this plant is discussed recently is out of control. And some people tend to forget that there is a huge number of plants that are really similar to this PC…and they are coming from the habitats. In Peru, there are similar plants and I just posted the examples that you can find in Bolivia as well. But that doesn´t mean that those plants were just invented by cookoo internet theoreticians. They were collected, sold and commercially cultivated. This plant does probably NOT come from Backeberg, which is another theory that was discussed heavily.

Fed vs Unfed
This is a nice Pic that shows the difference between Fed and Unfed PC Trichocereus

PC Cutting flower_1
Flowers of Trichocereus PC
Trichocereus PC Flower

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Trichocereus Parque de las Leyendas Peru

Hey guys, wanted to show these new photos from Lima, Peru. Many Trichocereus pachanoi, but also some other interesting plants that deserve to be seen. Thanks again for providing the photos and for making advertising for these glorious plants. Muchas Gracias. 😉

Photos from PARQUE DE LAS LEYENDAS

Parque de Las Leyendas
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Trichocereus pallarensis / Echinopsis pallarensis

Trichocereus pallarensis, also known as Echinopsis pallarensis, is an obscure species from North Peru that was discovered and described by Friedrich Ritter. It belongs into the same context that Trichocereus santaensis / Echinopsis santaensis belongs to.

trichocereus-pallarensis-seeds-samen-north-peru Echinopsis pallarensis

trichocereus-pallarensis-seeds-samen-north-peru Echinopsis pallarensis 2

Photo: Cactusaffinity.com

Trichocereus pallarensis is a species that was described by Friedrich Ritter and listed in his WINTER catalogs starting in 1961! I do have most of the old Winter catalogs, but I unfortunately not the ones after 1960. But that´s not a problem as I have a whole lot of other information about Trichocereus pallarensis.

Ritter wrote about this species numerous times. He basically called this plant a “variety of Trichocereus pachanoi”, but described it as a new species just in case. Back then, it was common that botanists or taxonomists wrote new descriptions only based on minor differences, that would only be seen as a regional form by today´s standards.

Trichocereus pallarensis has 3 – 6 radial spines (15 – 50 mm long). Those are brown or honey colored and relatively thin compared with the ones on Trichocereus peruvianus and Trichocereus pachanoi. The middle spines are often missing or there is only one very strong and long middle spine. It is very similar to Tr. pachanoi in regards to the spination and most of the spines are only few millimeters long. The areoles are often very small and those packed areoles usually tend to miss the one middle spine as well.

Flowers of Trichocereus pallarensis:

Friedrich Ritter was not able to get a good description of the flower and I am working on one myself. The plant is very rare and if you happen to have a flowering sized one, please let me know so we can improve the flower description. With that said, it comes from the Pachanoi group and is probably almost identical to the one of Tr. pachanoi. The flower is definitely white, but I´d love to measure it some more.

Fruit of Echinopsis pallarensis: 

The fruit of Trichocereus pallarensis is 5 cm long and 4 cm thick. Covered with GRAY wool.
Seeds: The seeds of Trichocereus pallarensis are identical to the ones on other Tr. pachanoi types.

Origin/ Type locality of T.pallarensis:

Trichocereus pallarensis grows in Llancora, near Cajamarca. Near Pallar (that´s where the name comes from) and east of the cordillera Blanca. Department Ancash at 2.500 – 3.000 meters altitude.

Where to buy Trichocereus pallarensis seeds and plants:

Trichocereus pallarensis is very rare and only a few shops have them in stock. If you want to buy seeds of Trichocereus pallarensis, please join my seed list and I´ll let you know next time I have some. You can also get some fresh seeds from Sacredsucculents.com every now and then. They have a beautiful number of crosses that they produce every year. You might also be able to get some from Cactusaffinity and Misplant.

trichocereus-pallarensis-seeds-samen-north-peru Echinopsis pallarensis 3

Trichocereus pallarensis FR1468 Locality: Machar, Peru (Ritter)

If you liked this article, check out some of our other pieces on Echinopsis pachanoi or Echinopsis peruviana.

You can support us by joining our Facebook group TRICHOCEREUS & ECHINOPSIS GROWERS WORLDWIDE, or follow us on Instagram.

Clone One (Trichocereus pachanoi – Aplantis)

Clone One is a Trichocereus pachanoi clone that was made available by the owner of the website Aplantis.net! The clone was collected in Cajabamba in Peru in 2013. Its main characteristics are the bright green epidermis color and the rather uniquely shaped V-notches. It has 6 – 7 ribs and very short spines. This San Pedro also reminds me of the Ecuadorian plants, which makes it a beautiful and rare plant.

At the original site, this plant was hacked down by the previous owner and dumped beside a road. In Peru, those plants are often used as natural fencing and it is very common for the plants to be removed and thrown away at some point. In this case, it was a real case of luck that made this clone available.

Aplantis sometimes offers Clone One in our Trichocereus Facebook group or through his website www.Aplantis.net. His prices are very affordable and it is one of the most typical and attractive Trichocereus pachanoi clones I know of. If you want to buy a cutting of this clone, you should message Aplantis through his website.

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Trichocereus pachanoi Clone One Aplantis
Trichocereus pachanoi Clone One Aplantis

On the following two photos you can see how the plants looked when Aplantis came across them.

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clone-one-trichocereus-pachanoi-aplantis-2

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Tom Juul´s Giant / TJG (Trichocereus)

Tom Juul´s Giant / TJG (Trichocereus pachanoi)

The well known clone TOM JUUL´S GIANT / TJG goes back to the former butcher Tom Juul´s, who imported this plant into the United states.

Tom Juul´s Giant TJG Trichocereus Cactus AffinityPhoto: Cactusaffinity.com

Tom Juul had a giant plant in his garden and after his death, cuttings of this plant were distributed by Sacred Succulents and other cactus nurseries. K. Trout wrote a great piece on the whole history of the plant in his San Pedro book.

It is sometimes listed as a separate species, but to me it is just a regional form of Trichocereus pachanoi. Yes, there are differences in regards to the flowers but in my eyes the differences are by far not big enough to list this as another species.

There are many so called TJGoids available on the market. At least a large percentage of those are Ecuadorian Pachanois. They slightly differ from the Peruvian version, but those differences are subtle and similar to what you can see on other regional forms that have quite a wide variety. Similar plants as the TJG could also be observed in Lima and Arequipa, which underlines the wide distribution that this type has
Personally, I like to call this plant TJG…and I only do that because I have a soft touch for old strains and want to keep track of those names. Otherwise, this plant is probably just another regional version of the San Pedro.
Many hybrid crosses with the TJG are available. Either by Sacred Succulents or Misplant, who used his mother plant to make some exceptional crosses. The origin of this plant is not known, but it is presumed that Juul got it from one of the UC South American Cactus Collection expeditions. It is hard to spot the clone because there are so many similar plants around. Nonetheless it is a wonderful plant that is most likely of Ecuadorian origin. The similarities between some of the Ecuadorians and this plant are very strong. That all said; it doesn´t really matter because it is one of many strains related to Trichocereus pachanoi. Most people would probably simply call it a San Pedro and that´s technically correct.

KK339 Trichocereus pachanoi

KK339 originally was an Ecuadorian collection of Trichocereus pachanoi made by Karel Knize!

This wonderful plant is one of the most interesting plants distributed by the Peruvian wholesaler Karel Knize. The species is pretty much the archetype of an Ecuadorian Pachanoi. This type is extremely typical for what we know from Ecuador. The plants can be bright green or glaucus and have strong V-notches that are very dominant. In fact, many Ecuadorian clones are misidentified as Tom Juul´s Giant. People see how different they are to the Peruvian counterparts and believe that it might actually be a TJG.

Photos of both versions of KK339

KK339 Trichocereus pachanoi Ecuador 2

KK339 Trichocereus pachanoi comes from Chan Chan in Ecuador. Knize had no further background information on the plant and I will try to get some more photos in the future. If you have photos of this or any other KK type, please send me a message!

Those photos were donated by Rodni and Delia Kisar of Trichocereus.com.au

KK339 Trichocereus pachanoi Ecuador Delia Kisar4
Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar3
Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar2
Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar
Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar6
Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar5

The newer collections of KK339 are VERY different to the original ones and look more like the plants you can see from Tarma for example. Hard to tell how this exactly happened, but the newer KK339 are definitely too spiny to be normal Trichocereus pachanoi. Below you can see some examples,

Trichocereus KK339 Noah
Trichocereus KK339 a
Trichocereus KK339 1

Trichocereus pachanoi / Echinopsis pachanoi in Ecuador!

Trichocereus pachanoi in Ecuador is rare, but there definitely are a lot of them to be found there.

The original type locality of Echinopsis pachanoi is in Ecuador. Though it is much more common in Peru these days the most typical specimens to the description can be found in Ecuador. Those Ecuadorian Pachanois are rare, but they can be found and have a long history. I will use this page for all my Ecuadorian Pachanois. There are many, but it´ll take a while for me to get everything up to date.

Those photos were made by Neil Logan during the Sacredsucculents.com Field Trips!

Vilcabamba (N. Logan)

Another cool Planting from the SS Field Trip in 2008! Pic: Neil Logan + Ben Kamm sacredsucculents.com! Please try to support this great company!

Photos of Trichocereus pachanoi in Ecuador

Trichocereus pachanoi in Ecuador Echinopsis Vilcabamba

Trichocereus pachanoi in Ecuador Echinopsis Vilcabamba 2

Those photos were provided by Chavinherbalist.com. Thanks a lot to them…check their shop out!

Trichocereus pachanoi in Ecuador Echinopsis Vilcabamba 3

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Trichocereus pachanoi in Ecuador Echinopsis Vilcabamba 4

This is KK339 Trichocereus pachanoi goes back to Karel Knize. Those photos were provided by Rodni and Delia Kisar by Trichocereus.com.au!

Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar3 Echinopsis
Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar Echinopsis 2
Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar Echinopsis 22
Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar Echinopsis 2 7
Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar 5ss
Trichocereus pachanoi KK339 Ecuador Delia Kisar4

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Super Pedro (Trichocereus scopulicola)

Super Pedro is a very interesting Trichocereus scopulicola cultivar or hybrid involving it! It is closely related to the cultivar Trichocereus cordobensis.

SUPER PEDRO is a very popular clone within the Trichocereus community. I (and many others) originally thought this plant to be some kind of hybrid between Trichocereus pachanoi and Trichocereus scopulicola, but the exact parentage is unknown. It is a hybrid that was grown from a whole lot of unlabeled seeds by Jim Hall from Cactuscountry.com. The whole body and the flower traits point towards it being a form or hybrid involving Trichocereus scopulicola. There are definitely many differences between it and the standard Scop FR991, but you can clearly see the relationship to this species. Friedrich Ritter also collected and sold populations from Tarija that he described as Trichocereus crassicostatus. NMCR also collected a whole lot of seeds that produced versions of Trichocereus scopulicola that clearly differed from Ritter´s main collection. There are very few collections of Trichocereus scopulicola, so it´s either one of those or a hybrid with another parent.

SUPER PEDRO = Trichocereus cordobensis?

No, probably not. Trichocereus cordobensis is a bit closer to classic Trichocereus scopulicola and I think that they might be connected to the seeds from NMCR too. SUPER PEDRO on the other hand comes from the Australian cactus garden CACTUS COUNTRY.

One of those NMCR Scops can be seen here. The photo was made my M. S. Smith, who has a pretty amazing Flicker account with nothing but cool Tricho pics.

T. 'Super pedro'
Super Pedro
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Trichocereus cordobensis NMCR

Buy Seed or Plants: Super Pedro is popular but not available all the time. Your best bet to get some is to contact some breeders like Rodni Chisar, Misplant or Cactilicious.

t cordobenesis_super pedro

Fruit of SUPER PEDRO

Trichocereus Scopulicola Super Pedro

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Chavín de Huántar: Trichocereus santaensis & El Lanzon

Chavín de Huántar: Trichocereus santaensis & El Lanzon

Chavín de Huántar is an archaeological site in Peru with a long history of Trichocereus cultivation. There are plants that can be found within the ruins and those plants probably go back for many thousands of years. The ruins are thought to be from 1200BC and the age of this complex is energetically discussed among archaeologists.

This legendary place is located in the Ancash area and holds great religious as well as historic significance, which is why the center was in the midst of the Chavin culture. It is located near the important Peruvian city Lima and lies at the confluence of two large rivers: The Rio Mosnar and the Huanchecsa river. The Trichocereus strains from this area have a huge botanic variability and the area is home to a large number of different plants and Trichocereus species.

Chavín_de_Huántar Sharon odbPhoto: Sharon ODB

Peru Map Trichocereus Chavin Santa Valley santaensisMap: Urutseg

Photos from the Sacred Succulents Field Trips. Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com. 

Trichocereus sp, Chavindehuantar, Ancash, Peru 

The regional form known from this area is probably somewhere between Trichocereus cuzcoensis and Trichocereus peruvianus. We saw plants that clearly belonged into the Trichocereus santaensis group as well as other weird plants…some of which even look like Trichocereus huanucoensis.

 

Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 

Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru  2

Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 3 Echinopsis santaensis

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru

Another great Specimen from the Ancash Region in Peru.

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 1

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 3

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 1

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 2

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru Tillandsia Echinopsis santaensis

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 3

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 1

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 2

El Lanzon Trichocereus :

This legendary photo is made by Aplantis.net:

Trichocereus El Lanzon Echinopsis santaensis Trichocereus santaensis peruvianus

Photo: Aplantis.net

This plant has a great history and most people who visit the area can´t go by without taking loads of photos. It´s one of my most favorite plants.

Trichocereus chavin de huantar Peru El Lanzon

Those plants were posted by ChavinHerbalist. They are trying to preserve the genetics and posted some amazing photos on Facebook. Check them out!

AD002 Chavin Herbalist Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis

Trichocereus Chavin Seedling cactus Trichocereus santaensis

Photos below Trichocereus santaensis / Echinopsis santaensis in Chavin de Huantar, El Lanzon (Riley Flatten)

Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 2 Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 3 Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 4 Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 2 Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 22 Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 3 Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 4 El Lanzon Photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 3 Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 2 Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 5 Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 2 Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 3 Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 4 Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 5

 

Trichocereus pachanoi / Echinopsis pachanoi Beautiful Species!

Trichocereus pachanoi, also known as Echinopsis pachanoi, is columnar cactus with a long history of being grown as a crop and ritual plants. Today they can be found in every South American country. It is endemic to Peru and Ecuador, where the type locality can be found.

Please note that this is a purely informational article and we do not sell any plants or seeds of Trichocereus pachanoi. 

Photo Trichocereus pachanoi Echinopsis pachanoi cactus

The official and currently valid name is Echinopsis pachanoi, which came up when Friedrich & Rowley made a poorly thought out merger of the genus Trichocereus with Echinopsis! Trichocereus and Echinopsis are closely related, but there are so many differences in regards to the flowers and the body that it makes no sense to use Echinopsis for all kinds of different plants, while the same authors support the differentiation of even closer genera like Loxanthocereus and Borzicactus. I would jokingly call the chaos around the Echinopsis names the dark ages of Trichocereus  taxonomy. Now after numerous cladistic studies that pointed out that the genus Echinopsis needs to be changed again, the opinion of many authors have shifted and experts like Joel Lodé went on to use Trichocereus again. The genus Trichocereus is not officially back yet, but it would be highly unlikely if it wouldn´t be brought back within the next 10 or 20 years.

Echinopsis pachanoi aka Trichocereus pachanoi is a VERY variable cactus. It is not easy to differentiate Trichocereus pachanoi from other atypical Trichocereus types, such as a short-spined Trichocereus peruvianus or very spiny specimens of Trichocereus scopulicola. One of the most common strains of Trichocereus scopulicola, FR991, is very similar to Trichocereus pachanoi. It´s actually not really important, but I want to include this interesting little piece of information to point out what other and extremely similar plants can be out there-

Echinopsis pachanoi, aka Trichocereus pachanoi, is a very fast-growing columnar cactus native to the Andean Mountains, where it grows between 2.000 and 3.000 meters altitude.

It´s natural habitat includes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador and Peru but the plant can also be found in countless cactus collections all across the world. It is very similar to its relative Trichocereus peruvianus, now called Echinopsis peruvianus/peruviana or Peruvian Torch. Some growers, including Friedrich Ritter considered them to be synonymous and I tend to agree with that opinion because I’ve seen how extremely variable this whole group of cacti can be. Its general appearance depends on the environment and the overall health of a specimen. Trichocereus pachanoi is a very important plant for the Peruvian natives and has been used for all kinds of purposes.

Traditional names of Trichocereus pachanoi:

Achuma, Wachuma, Aguacolla, Huachuma, Hahuacollay, San Pedro,

Description of T. pachanoi:

Trichocereus Pachanoi naturally occurs in Ecuador and Peru, but can also be found planted all across Peru, because it was considered a sacred plant for the Peruvian natives. Its stems are light to dark green, sometimes glaucous and have a diameter of 5 to 20 cm  and usually 5–8 ribs, depending on the size. The white or gray areoles can produce numerous spines, that can get up to 2 cm long or more, depending on the environmental conditions it is grown in. As already mentioned before, the plant can be totally  spineless. The areoles are spaced evenly alongside the ribs, and between 1 and 2 centimeters apart.

Trichocereus pachanoi grows like a tree and reaches sizes of up to 6 meters and in some rare cases, even more. The plant pups from the base and grows columnar, unlike the smaller, clumping species of Echinopsis. Trichocereus pachanoi is a textbook example of a columnar cactus. It is one of the most beautiful cacti that are out there. The skin color can vary greatly and while some of the Ecuadorian Trichocereus pachanoi have a bright green color, there are many glaucous types. Most collection plants lack the spines while the specimens in the habitat usually tend to have more spines. There even are forms which are said to be the wild, spiny form of Trichocereus sachanoi and which was probably brought into cultivation by Karel Knize. I once bought some of those “wild Pachanois” and they had very long and yellowish spines.

Flowers: White, coming out at the upper parts of the Columns. Trichocereus pachanoi is a night flowering and self-sterile species. That means it needs another pollen donor to produce seed. The flowers are very large and attractive, usually around 18–25 cm long and with a diameter of up to 21 centimeters. It produces green fruits that are up to 7 cm long.

The flowers produce a very pleasant smell. The sepals have a brownish/reddish color while the petals are white. The stylus has a green base. The tube is covered with gray/black hairs.

Type location: Ecuador, Chan Chan Valley.

In the original description, Rose mentioned that Trichocereus Pachanoi comes from the higher areas of the Andes, where it grows at 2000-3000 meters altitude. Britton and Rose considered Cuena in Ecuador as the location of the type. That means that the plants that can be found there are the most typical for their description. Trichocereus Pachanoi grows all across Ecuador, from the Chan Chan valley down to the large Armatocereus populations in the south. In addition, the plant can also be found all over Peru and those plants are usually wild forms.

Trichocereus Pachanoi was named in honor of the well-known cactus collector and taxonomist, Pachano.

Commercial names and synonyms

Trichocereus sp. Torres & Torres, Trichocereus huanucoensis, Trichocereus, Tom Juul´s Giant (which is probably just an Ecuadorian Pachanoi), TPM, Trichocereus HBG 53196, Loehmans monstrose Trichocereus, Trichocereus OST 90641, KK2150 Trichocereus, and so on. 

Cultivation: Trichocereus pachanoi is very easy to cultivate. It’s a plant take can take a fair amount of frost and that´s relatively frost hardy for a cactus. Short night frosts and short temperature spikes down to minus 5° Celsius shouldn’t be a problem for them, but it also depends on the general health of the plant. I do not recommend to leave it in wet soil for long if the temperatures are low. This is one of the plants that takes a lot of water when the temperatures are high. In summer, I water them weekly and fertilize them once a month. And they love it. They need to reach a certain before they will flower, but if you give them a large enough pot and sufficient nutrients, they will even flower without free root run. I can recommend a sandy, acidic soil that dries up very fast. That ensures that the plant is dry once you bring it inside to the winter storage. In some warmer countries, Trichocereus sp. can be grown outside and they usually take it very well. I saw beautiful specimens in Australia or California. The Only thing you need to be careful about is rain because they don’t like getting wet feet for a long time. They take it for a couple of days, but it´s best if to give them some rain protection and a covering sail to prevent them from being overgrown by moss and algae. During the growth season, Trichocereus Pachanoi can grow very fast if watered on a regular basis.

Ecuadorian Specimens of Trichocereus pachanoi

Trichocereus pachanoi can be found on all kinds of witches markets in Peru and Ecuador. Ecuadorian Pachanoi tend to have a distinct, bright green color and are among the most sought after Trichos that are. In general, Trichocereus Pachanoi makes a great grafting stock, because of its fast growth and frost hardiness. Below you can find photos of plants that are typical for the Ecuadorian phenotype. The plants are often surprisingly spiny, with rounded ribs and 1-3 longer spines on white felted areoles.

Photos of Ecuadorian T. pachanoi

Photo Trichocereus pachanoi Ecuador Echinopsis pachanoi cactus
Photo Trichocereus pachanoi Ecuador Echinopsis pachanoi cactus 2
Photo Trichocereus pachanoi Ecuador Echinopsis pachanoi cactus 3
Photo Trichocereus pachanoi Ecuador Echinopsis pachanoi cactus 4
Photo Trichocereus pachanoi Ecuador Echinopsis pachanoi cactus 5
Photo Trichocereus pachanoi Ecuador Echinopsis pachanoi cactus 6

Photos below are from the Sacred Succulents Field Trips and show plants in Vilcabamba Ecuador. Note the dark glow.

Trichocereus pachanoi Vilcabamba Ecuador Neil Logan
Trichocereus pachanoi Vilcabamba Ecuador Neil Logan 2

Below Trichocereus pachanoi ‘Zeus’ (Philocacti)

Trichocereus pachanoi photo Zeus

Photo below T.pachanoi KK339 (Rodni Kisar) 

KK339 Trichocereus pachanoi Ecuador 2 Rod

Below: Echinopsis pachanoi photo of KK339 by Karel Knize

KK339 Trichocereus pachanoi Ecuador 2

Diseases and how to avoid them

They are fairly resilient and don’t suffer from many diseases. They can suffer from bacterial or fungal rot every now and then and there are various pests & infections that growers can encounter. Black rot is usually benign and heals up after a while. There are fungal infections that can infect all plants from the genus Trichocereus, for example Witches Broom Disease, Damping Off or some other forms of orange rot. In many cases, fungal infections kill the plant within short time and infected plants should be removed from the collection immediately. Another common pest are root mealies, which are often brought into the collection through bought plants from online marketplaces and it’s hard to get rid of them once and for all. Chemical pesticides like Imidacloprid work very well but because they have a very bad impact on the beneficial insects like Bees and worms, I wouldn’t recommend it. Neem or Neem Oil works very well against all kinds of pests, including the hardy spider mites, Root mealies or scale. Scale can also be scrubbed off if the outbreak is not very bad. Trichocereus pachanoi should get a soil without too much humus because it tends to attract rot. Another natural pesticide that is used in organic farming is sulfur, which works against Spider mites and infections. Some growers also like to use diatomaceous earth to get rid of minor pests. Generally speaking, Trichocereus pachanoi is one of the easiest cacti that you can grow and most beginners shouldn’t have a problem to grow them.

Frost tolerance of Echinopsis pachanoi:

Trichocereus pachanoi is able to take short night frosts, down to -9° Celsius, which is 15.8° Fahrenheit. The minimum average temperature is around 10° Celsius or 50° Fahrenheit. Using Valerian flower extract is beneficial and can help to improve their resistance against frost.

General recommendations of things to avoid

A common thing that new growers like to do is taking too many cuttings to get a lot of plants very fast. I really hate because that will slow down the general growth dramatically. Very large plants grow much faster than small cuttings. If you really want to  produce a lot of them them (to get grafting stock, for example), make sure not to cut too small segments. The minimum length should be at least 30 centimeters long. That ensures that your cutting is growing fast and vigorously. Cutting a Trichocereus promotes pupping; but only if you don’t cut away too much. Small stumps will often struggle to survive if they werent in a great general shape when the cut was taken and it´s just something that I see a lot. Don´t mess too much with the pH level of the soil, because it can kill the plant if the pH is too high or low. They usually like slightly acidic soil. Don´t use regular plant soil because it contains WAY too much Humus or wood products for them. They might like it in summer but as soon as the temps drop, your plant might rot away because the roots take forever to dry. Don´t leave water standing in the pot because it will spoil the roots. Don´t spray them with oil and leave them in the sun directly after the treatment, because the sun will probably burn it. Only apply oil or alcohol in the evening when the sun cannot burn the plant and make sure not to directly expose plants that spent the winter in the house to the burning sun, because it will give it a sunburn.

Getting Trichocereus over the Winter: Most Trichocereus species can be overwintered in a bright place with a temperature between 10° Celsius/50° Fahrenheit. As long as the plants are in winter storage, they don’t require water because they go into dormancy. Because of that, they should be kept completely dry between October and April. Otherwise, the soil might spoil, what often leads to the death of the plant. Please note that this only applies to growers in Europe or similar country, where the strong night frosts and rain periods would kill the plants outside. Make sure to give them enough fresh air to reduce the risk of fungal infection. Most Trichocereus tolerate cold winter storage very well. Besides, this cold storage is the same that happens to them in nature and it increases their general ability to flower. Plants that are kept too warm all year round have trouble to produce flowers.

Just like the other plants from the genus Echinopsis, Trichocereus pachanoi is very easy from seed. But only if you know what you´re doing. I can recommend the takeaway-tech, which is a development of the Fleischer Tec. Mr. Fleischer was a cactus enthusiast that invented a technique in which he germinated cactus seeds in small glass jars with a closed lid. Now, there are those 250 ml Salad containers that can be used in a similar way and they work with many cacti. Now, the seeds need light to germinate. So you don´t cover the seeds with soil but sprinkle them on the soil. The seeds of Trichocereus Pachanoi are very tiny. As a soil, I can recommend a mix of standard sowing soil (not regular plant soil because sowing soil does not spoil so easily) and sharp coarse sand. This way, the chances for fungal infections are rather slim. In addition, you can add a fungicide right when you add the seeds. There are various fungicides available on the market. Just make sure to not use Sulfur or copper during the germination process. Sulfur works great to get rid of infections on adult plants; but it can kill every single seed in a sowing container. So don´t use it if you intend to germinate seed. You can ask your pharmacist about potential fungicides.

Now, after you mixed the soil, you put it in the small see-through container and make sure to even out the soil layer by slightly stomping the soil with another growing container. This is to avoid that the seeds fall into little cracks. The soil level needs to be straight to ensure that the seedlings have enough stability later on. After you consolidated the soil, you can sprinkle the Trichocereus seeds on top of the soil. Then, you get yourself a water sprayer, add in some fungicide or antibiotic solution (but only one that doesn’t kill seeds) and spray the whole thing very lightly. Trichocereus Seed does not take a lot of water to germinate. Make sure not to add too much water, because it WILL 100% kill them if the soil looks like a swamp. Besides, make sure to get yourself VIABLE seeds. There are many crappy seeds available on the market and many of them are not viable anymore. Trichocereus seed usually stays fresh for 5-10 years, but the germination rates are best during the first year. After you’ve sprayed the whole seed/soil mix, you can close the lid and take it to a bright spot, like a window or under an LED lamp. Light increases germination rates dramatically and I can only recommend you to get yourself an LED lamp. But I’d recommend you to get one that uses High Power LEDs and that has at least 150 Watt. From all the things I got myself, this was the thing that increased the germination rates the most. Don´t bake the seeds though; a light spot on the window is absolutely sufficient. Ideal germination temperature is between 25 and 30 degree Celsius. If the seed was viable, you will get some germinations within 2-3 weeks. If you get white mold on the seeds, they are probably dead. It does not help to leave seed wet for more than 6 weeks in order to “wait for germinations”. It’s rather counterproductive so if you don’t get germinations within 4-6 weeks, take off the lid, let everything dry out and then, restart again. Difficult or half-dead seed can be treated with Gibberellic acid to wake it up from dormancy. Besides, cycles of drying out and watering can help to bring back zombie seed to life.
If you get mold inside the container, take off the lid asap and water away the mold. At this point, you´ll have to leave the lid open and grow them without a lid. If you do that, they need to be sprayed with water on a regular basis to stay alive. Like, twice a day. But don’t keep them wet for long and ensure that the soil can get dry between the watering cycles. Otherwise, you might get fungus gnats, which look like tiny, see-through worms. In that case, let the soil dry out.

The small seedlings have enough nutrients to survive for a couple months, but it helps to fertilize them IN A VERY DILUTED CONCENTRATION every now and then. Don’t use the regular dose that adult plants get or they will die. Besides, don’t expose the seedlings to DIRECT sunlight or they will get sunburn and die. Well yeah, after one year, they should be big enough to re-pot them and single them out. If you encounter problems in your culture, just let me know and I´ll try to help you!

The flowers of Trichocereus pachanoi: 

The flowers are large, white, hairy and covered with scales. The color of the hairs is usually black or brown, while the color of the hair on the buds or flowers on the PC clone is mostly white and similar to that of Bolivian species like Trichocereus bridgesii.

Photo Trichocereus pachanoi Echinopsis pachanoi flower flowers flowering cactus 2
Photo Trichocereus pachanoi Echinopsis pachanoi flower tube flowers flowering cactus

Photos of T. pachanoi

Echinopsis pachanoi Trichocereus pachanoi photo 2
Echinopsis pachanoi Trichocereus pachanoi photo 6
Echinopsis pachanoi Trichocereus pachanoi photo 7
Trichocereus pachanoi Echinopsis pachanoi photos ribs


A typical specimen with relatively short spines.

Trichocereus pachanoi echinopsis pachanoi photos 8


Another very beautiful strain. The spine length is around 2 cm and this is not very uncommon.

Trichocereus pachanoi Bogan Australia hybrid Echinopsis 2
Trichocereus pachanoi Yowie Australia hybrid Echinopsis

Trichocereus pachanoi ‘Yowie’

Trichocereus pachanoi 'Rod' Ecuador Echinopsis cactus

Rather spine specimen, which might actually be an intermediate between T. peruvianus and T. pachanoi

Trichocereus pachanoi 'Rod' Ecuador Echinopsis cactus 2

Trichocereus pachanoi ‘Rod’

by Lars Echinopsis_pachanoi_San_Pedro_010

This picture shows one of the plants that Curt Backeberg sold, also known as Backeberg Pachanoi. He used to recommend the plant for grafting in the 50s and sold huge amounts of em through his cactus nursery.

trichocereus pachanoi Echinopsis pachanoi Curt backeberg
Trichocereus pachanoi kimnach Huntington Botanical Garden photo

Trichocereus pachanoi Kimnach et. al. 28760 – Huntington Botanical Garden

Trichocereus PC Echinopsis Pachanoi

This photo might actually show the PC clone, a version that is often attributed to T. pachanoi, but which needs investigation. Photo: by Lars

Chavin-cactus-stone Trichocereus Echinopsis ancient ruins

Stone plate from Chavin de Huantar showing typical Trichocereus cacti

Nephiliskos Kaktus-Azteke

Nephiliskos Kaktus-Azteke

Trichocereus pachanoi Echinopsis pachanoi group shot photo

 Ajor933 _san_pedro

Trichocereus pachanoi PC Echinopsis Predominant Cultivar PredominateTrichocereus pachanoi PC Echinopsis Predominant Cultivar Predominate

Forest & Kim Starr – Predominant Cultivar, also known as Predominate Cultivar. This one might not even be a Trichocereus pachanoi.

Trichocereus pachanoi PC Echinopsis Predominant Cultivar Predominate 2

Forest & Kim Starr – Predominant Cultivar, also known as Predominate Cultivar. This one might not even be a Trichocereus pachanoi.

Trichocereus pachanoi PC Echinopsis Predominant Cultivar Predominate 3

Forest & Kim Starr – Predominant Cultivar, also known as Predominate Cultivar.

Flower of Trichocereus pachanoi Echinopsis pachanoi


by Enfo Jardins_Mossèn_Costa_i_Llobera

Photo of Echinopsis pachanoi in Peru Trichocereus pachanoi

Anne Besnier Zavaleta  Fleur_de_cierge_du_PérouMacAllenBrothers Echinopsis-pachanoi-peru

Photo of Echinopsis pachanoi in Peru Trichocereus pachanoi 2

Echinopsis-pachanoi

PC Trichocereus Predominant Cultivar

Photo below probably shows the PC clone

Flowers of Trichocereus pachanoi Echinopsis flowering cactus

pizzodisevo Echinopsis_pachanoi

Flowers of Trichocereus pachanoi Echinopsis flowering cactus 2
Flowers of Trichocereus pachanoi Echinopsis flowering cactus 3

by Lars

And now, as a comparison, the almost identical Tom Juul´s Giant, which is considered to be a form of Trichocereus pachanoi. Copyright Misplant.net:

Trichocereus Tom Juul´s Giant TJG Echinopsis photo

Video comparison between Trichocereus pachanoi and Trichocereus peruvianus

Differences between Trichocereus pachanoi and Trichocereus bridgesii Video

Trichocereus Facebook Group

You can also find information on all kinds of Trichocereus hybrids and species in this Facebook group: Facebook.com/groups/trichocereus

Trichocereus puquiensis / Echinopsis puquiensis

Trichocereus puquiensis / Echinopsis puquiensis

The species Trichocereus puquiensis, also known as Echinopsis puquiensis, was described by Rauh & Backeberg as Trichocereus puquiensis Rauh et Backeberg nov. spec.. The description was originally published in DESCR. CACT. NOV. vol. 20 in 1956.

Depending on who you ask, there is a constant debate about whether or not this species is a “good name”. Anderson included it in his Cactus Lexicon as Echinopsis peruvianus ssp. puquiensis. Personally, I think that this plant is closer to Trichocereus pachanoi than it is to Trichocereus peruvianus. On the other hand, I also think that Tr. pachanoi and Tr. peruvianus are probably a very large and variable species with many intermediates between the two and I would not mind to throw Tr. puquiensis in there as well. The rib structure and areole shape of Tr. puquiensis is similar to the one on Tr. pachanoi. The big difference is that Tr. puquiensis has 8 – 11 ribs and a strong groove above the aroles. Please note that there are many different types from the Puquio region, what is the cause for the large number of different plants that go by this name.

Trichocereus Puquiensis gets up to 4 meters tall, but most plants are around 2 meters. It pups from the base and grows as columnar shoots, growing upwards. Tr. puquiensis has no cuzcoensis-ribs but a very similar spination. Think of it as a 8 – 11 ribbed Pachanoi with long cuzco spines that lack the typical cuzcoensis swollen spine bases. This is another giveaway that helps you to ID it.
The color of the epidermis is blue/green. It reaches a maximum diameter of 10-20 centimeters with ribs that are between 1-2 centimeters high, the areoles are 1-2 centimeter in diameter and felted, similar to the areoles on Trichocereus cuzcoensis.
Trichocereus puquiensis has 10-12 radial spines that are up to 2,5 centimeters long. The new spine growth of the radial spines is brown. It also has 1-2 long middle spines, of which one or two are pointing upwards. Those middle spines are 8-12 centimeters long. New spine growth is brown and old spine growth is gray, very similar to the one on Tr. cuzcoensis. You see it´s not a typical Pachanoi but a intermediate that involves traits of various species. Please note that there are some plants in the Puquio habitat that are in fact cuzcoensis related, and the Trichocereus puquiensis from Karel Knize is actually one of them.

Flowers: The flowers are 15-22 centimeters large and white. A typical San Pedro flower. The tube is up to 2.5 centimeters thick and hairy.

Fruit: Unkown. Probably similar to Pachanoi or cuzcoensis fruits.

Habitat: Puquio, Department Ayacucho and it only occurs there. It grows in neighborhood of Erdisia Quadringularis. Rauh assigned the collection number K119.

This is Rauh´s original, latin description, which slightly differs from mine.

Planta 3-4 m alta, a basi ramosa; caules columniformes glauci, 8-10 costati usque 15 cm crassi: costae angustae, ca- 1,5 cm altae; areolae 1cm in dia. lutei-brunnescenti-tomentosae, aculeis marginalibus ca. 10 usque 2cm longis, in calulibus hornis brunneis;aculei centrales plerumque 2, quorum superior oblique erectus vel transverse patents, usque 10 cm longus, basalis oblique deflexus 5-8 cm longus, in caule hornio badius, senectute canus; flores usque 15 cm longi, tubus floralis etiam in statu ante efflorationem rectus, usque 2cm crassus, squamis bractaeneis dense obtectus, quarum pars libera late trigona, in apicem obscurum excurrens, in axillis earum pili lanei brunneo-atri; phylla perigonii exteriora subtus basi rubiginosa, supra virescentia, interiora alba, filamenta, stylus et stigmata virescentia, radii stigmatis 19, ca. 5mm longi, cavum ovarii ferequadrangulare, 0,7cm in dia., nectarium 1,5 cm. longum, angustissimum, stylo crasso fere omnino expletum; fructus ignoti.

Friedrich Ritter sold Seed labeled as FR 155b. Ritter said that the Species would rather resemble Trichocereus pachanoi than Trichocereus cuzcoensis and I tend to agree. The species is limited to the pacific part of the Andes, while Tr. Cuzcoensis grows on the Atlantic Part. After years of investigating I finally think that Ritter was probably right, what means that Tr. puquiensis is more on the Pachanoi end of the spectrum. He knew the South American cacti better than everyone else, but during that time, many regional varieties were described as species and most of them did not age well and ended up being merged into Tr. peruvianus or Tr. pachanoi. I thought about this species a lot, and I guess there are plants that have traits of more than one species.

Karel Knize sold seeds & plants under that name too. Knize´s Trichocereus puquiensis is extremely close to Trichocereus cuzcoensis, but has a couple more ribs than a standard cuzcoensis.  Apart from that, the ribs are clearly Pachanoi ribs. I´ve seen plants with five ribs and some with ten.

Every time you come across a plant with more ribs than usual, Trichocereus puquiensis should be a considered option. It also does not have rounded spine basis, what clearly differentiates it from Trichocereus cuzcoensis. Knize´s version is becoming more and more common because Karel Knize sold large amounts of seed and plants in the past years.

Cultivation of Trichocereus puquiensis:

There is very few information about frost tolerance of Trichocereus puquiensis available. It should be grown like a standard Trichocereus pachanoi or peruvianus, because it´s general growth type is similar to that. It can tolerate frost but temperatures should not be lower than -5° to -10° celsius. Plants should be kept totally dry over winter.

Buy seeds or plants of Trichocereus puqiensis: 

You can buy seeds of Trichocereus puquiensis in my shop.

In the USA, I know of one supplier that grows the genuine Tr. puquiensis from Rauh & Backeberg´s description. Cactusaffinity.com! In Australia you can get live cuttings from the SAB shop.

large-prod-2070940-SAB_EchPeruPuquiensisKK1689

Photo: Shaman-Australis.com

This is KK1689:

t peru puquensis KK1689

t peru puquensis KK1689 1

This Pic is from Backeberg´s description:

trichocereus puquiensis005

Trichocereus puquiensis Echinopsis puquiensis

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If you want to read more about the genus Trichocereus, start here or here.

HB01 (Trichocereus puquiensis)

Trichocereus HB01 is a clone that originally comes from the Australian Shop HERBALISTICS. The plant was sourced from a garden in the Australian city Gatton in Queensland. The clone is usually short spined, but can get more spiny at a larger size.

It looks like a Trichocereus peruvianus with an very high rib count, or one of Friedrich Ritter´s Trichocereus puquiensis. It is very similar to Ritter´s old description. It tends to have a higher number of ribs than standard T.pachanoi or T.peruvianus. Tr. puquiensis was described with having 8 – 10 ribs and the pics that I got from the SAB member LHB2444 definitely fit the description. But yeah, not sure since this clone has very little background info attached to it. I´ve seen some cuttings of this clone develop some kind of skin discoloration and it´s possible there´s either a genetic or pathological reason for this. We´ll stay on the case to find out more.

Photos of Herbalistic´s Trichocereus HB01

t peru HB01
t peru HB01 1

The photos below (Zed240) show a plant that was labeled HB01 but looks a little bit different and has substantially longer spines as the one in the first two pics. That being said, there is a great variability within all the Trichocereus species, so I would not be surprised if that difference in spine length is caused by environmental factors. There also are 5 – 6 ribbed plants from Puquio and this second plant might be one of them. But no matter if the HB01 clone is actually a Trichocereus puquiensis or a Trichocereus peruvianus, it definitely as an amazing plant that will look awesome in your collection. You can find the description and photos of Tr. puquiensis here!

Trichocereus Peruvianus_HB01 Zed__006

Photos: Zed240

Trichocereus Peruvianus_HB01 Zed__008
Trichocereus Peruvianus_HB01 Zed__007
Trichocereus Peruvianus_HB01 Zed__005

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Crowdfunding Campaign TRICHOCEREUS book VOLUME 1

Crowdfunding Campaign TRICHOCEREUS book VOLUME 1

This is the crowdfunding campaign post for our first Trichocereus book TRICHOCEREUS VOLUME 1: THE SAN PEDRO GROUP.

Crowdfunding Campaign TRICHOCEREUS book VOLUME 1

Hi guys, I just wanted to take the time to let you all know about the status of my crowd funding campaign for the printing costs of my book TRICHOCEREUS VOLUME 1: THE SAN PEDRO GROUP. Until 2016, this book was available exclusively through my Indiegogo campaign here: https://igg.me/at/2h2Jsr6XawQ/x/13533390.

The campaign is now closed, but it is now up for sale in our shop here:

https://trichocereus.net/product/the-san-pedro-group-book-trichocereus-patrick-noll

I´ve been working on this book for a few years now and it´s finally getting close to a release date. It´ll have more than 300 all-color pages and will contain hundreds of color pics showing plants from the San Pedro Group in the habitat, botanic gardens and collections worldwide. There were dozens of well known people helping me with photos for this book and I am extremely proud that I was given the chance to write it! I´ll make sure it´ll be a high quality book that will look awesome on your shelf! There will be descriptions, photos and cultivation advice as well as a detailed guide on how to germinate difficult seed. The book takes a close look at flowers, fruits and old names that are no longer valid. This book contains a whole lot of different species and commercial varieties like Trichocereus pachanoi, Trichocereus peruvianus, Trichocereus bridgesii, Trichocereus scopulicola, Trichocereus tarmaensis, Trichocereus cuzcoensis, Trichocereus huanucoensis, Trichocereus pallarensis and many, many more!

The printing costs are somewhere between 10.000 – 12.000 Euros and that´s why I started the campaign on Indiegogo two days ago. Now after just 2 days, the campaign already reached 69% of its goal and is getting new supporters every single day.

The number of available books is very limited. There only are 250 softcover books and 100 hardcover books available exclusively through the campaign. The hardcover books already sold out but I managed to add a few that I actually wanted to put in the Trichocereus shop. Both the softcover version as well as the hard cover version are available for a reduced crowd funding price to say thank you to all the backers. The soft cover version will costs 58 Euro (+shipping costs) and the hardcover version will cost 88 Euro (+shipping costs). Both versions will be printed on high quality paper and with high quality ink. But because of the increased price of the hardcover edition, I could use an even better paper- and ink quality as well as some thread stitching to provide a higher value for the collectors. All the hardcover books are limited, numbered and signed as way to thank you for your support!
There also are package deals and re-seller packages to make it easier for shops or group-buyers to buy it. The books will be printed in June and the shipping phase begins in June or July. If you are not able to participate in the campaign due to whatever reasons, just let me know and I´ll try to find a way to make it work. It´s important to me that everyone who supports this project will actually get one.

Alright guys, it counts now and if I can´t get the campaign funded, the books won´t look as brilliant as they will when it reaches its goal. So please support my project on Indiegogo. The crowdfunding campaign will run for 60 days and I hope to reach the goal within the first 2-3 weeks. If you have any questions or just want to get in touch with me, you can reach me through EG [ät] trichocereus.net. You can also get in touch with me through our Trichocereus Facebook Group!

Cover Design not final and subject to change.

Sausage Plant (Trichocereus peruvianus)

Sausage Plant is a very blue type of short spined Trichocereus peruvianus or some kind of Trichocereus pachanoi. The name comes from the “sausage-like” growth. It has the tendency to terminate its growth and pup again on top of the old shoot. That look can sometimes make them impression of a sausage.

It originally comes from South Australia, but there also are other sites where it can be found. That also includes the Fields collection.

Unfortunately, I do not have a good pic of this pupping behaviour, but it’s been reported from various growers that own this plant. It definitely is one of the most interesting Tricho clones out there and exceedingly rare in cultivation.

Photos of SAUSAGE PLANT

Sausage Plant (Trichocereus peruvianus)

pot sausage Plant trichocereus san pedro
S. Plant (Trichocereus peruvianus)

post-4489-0-56180800-1384399704 sausage

Pics: GoT

post-4489-0-52381100-1384399718 pot sausage

Sausage Plant (1)
Sausage P. x Trichocereus Scopulicola

Sausage Plant (2)
This is a Sausage P. x Trichocereus Scopulicola

Sausage x Scop
This is a Sausage Plant x Trichocereus Scopulicola

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TPQC (Trichocereus peruvianus Quasi Cristata)

TPQC is another clone from SAB member Nitrogen. The ID of the species changed repeatedly in the past, but it is probably a Trichocereus peruvianus. It developed crested growth after an injury, but is generally not a crested clone and I have never seen one of the cuts revert back to crested growth. It is probably best to consider it a normal clone of Trichocereus peruvianus.

Photos of TPQC (Trichocereus peruvianus Quasi Cristata)

TPQC (Trichocereus peruvianus Quasi Cristata)
TPQC (Trichocereus peruvianus Quasi Cristata)