Tag: cacti

Trichocereus litoralis – Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis

Trichocereus litoralis – Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis

This beautiful Trichocereus species is definitely closely related to Trichocereus chiloensis and the current taxonomy is treating it as a variety or subspecies to it. Trichocereus litoralis always was a problematic species because there are so many intermediate forms between Trichocereus chiloensis and Trichocereus litoralis that it is extremely difficult to draw the line somewhere. While some treat it as part of Trichocereus chiloensis, some others disagree and treat it as a separate species. Personally, I think that the whole group of plants surrounding Trichocereus chiloensis is very variable and we should simply respect that plants can be related to each other and at the same time, look a little bit different. The species is also very closely related to Trichocereus skottsbergii, which I also regard as a variety of Trichocereus chiloensis/Echinopsis chiloensis.

Origin of E.litoralis:

Chile. Growing mostly around the coast line. Coquimbo

Synonyms of T.litoralis:

Echinopsis litoralis, Cereus litoralis, Trichocereus chiloensis var. litoralis, Trichocereus chilensis var. litoralis, Cereus chilensis,

The type location is in Zapallar, north of Valparaiso near the coast of Chile. The species is widely distributed all across the coast up to Los Vilos. The many radial spines are needle-like, while the middle spines are pretty strong and thick and up to 3 cm long. It has 9-28 radial spines and 3-6 middle spines.

Trichocereus chiloensis ssp. litoralis gets between 1-2 meters tall. It has a very dark green color and and a maximum diameter of 10-15 centimeters.

Ribs of Echinopsis chiloensis ssp.litoralis:

15-22, areoles approximately 1-2 centimeters apart of each other.

Flowers of Trichocereus litoralis:

Trichocereus litoralis has a white flower, which is extremely similar to the one on Trichocereus chiloensis. The flowers are up to 15 centimeters long, which is on the lower end of the scale for Trichocerei.

Fruit of E.litoralis:

Round, dark green. Up to 5 Centimeters in diameter

Where to buy seeds and cuttings of Trichocereus litoralis?

You can get some seeds of Trichocereus litoralis in my shop.

 

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 2

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 4

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 58c

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 8Pic: Richard Hipp! Thank you very much!

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 8

Have a look at this beautiful picture of Trichocereus litoralis growing along the coast line in Chile.

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 12

The flower of Trichocereus litoralis is extremely beautiful and can be used in hybrid breeding. Unfortunately, those plants take very long until they reach adulthood.

The photos below: Photos: Ármin Bindics

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 13

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 61

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 76

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis chiloensis ssp. litoralis 68

Photos below: Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes 77Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes (2) 2Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes (3) Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes (5)Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes (4)

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis

Ulrich Hörner

Trichocereus litoralis Echinopsis litoralis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus tarmaensis / Echinopsis tarmaensis

Trichocereus tarmaensis / Echinopsis tarmaensis

Trichocereus tarmaensis Rauh & Backeberg – Deser. Cact. Nov. 20. 1956

Trichocereus tarmaensis is a close relative of Trichocereus cuzcoensis that was described as a separate species. There are various differences between Trichocereus cuzcoensis and Trichocereus tarmaensis, and some forms of Trichocereus knuthianus are considered to be synonymous with Trichocereus tarmaensis as well.

Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis

Trichocereus tarmaensis reaches a size of 2 meters and is pupping from the base. It has 7-9 ribs that are approximately 2 centimeters wide, rounded at the top and with very distinct V-notches above the areoles. The areoles are approx. 2-2,5 centimeters apart with a diameter of 9 millimeters. Young growth areoles have a very fine brown wool that changes it´s color to a darker brown. It has 3-6 radial spines that are between 1 and 3 cm long. It often has one very large downward pointing spine that is up to 10 centimeters long. The plant usually has one of those middle spines. Old spine growth changes its color very soon to a gray, similar to what we know from Trichocereus cuzcoensis.

Flower of E.tarmaensis:

White, very similar or identical to some of the spiny forms of Trichocereus cuzcoensis or  Trichocereus peruvianus. The tube has brown hairs and the fruit reaches a maximum diameter of 5 centimeters.

Type location:

Central peru, Tarma in Peru at around 3000 meters.

Trichocereus tarmaensis looks very similar to Trichocereus tulhyacensis and both species are hard to distinguish if do not have the luck to observe them during the flowering phase . The flower of Trichocereus tulhuyacensis is pink, which is something that does not apply to any other Trichocereus species from this complex. If your Trichocereus has a reddish to pink flower, it´s not Trichocereus tarmaensis but Trichocereus tulhuyacensis or another close relative. Both Trichocereus tarmaensis and Trichocereus tulhuayacensis are very rare and mislabeled anyways. Karel Knize is selling seed of this type under the name KK2148 Trichocereus tarmaensis .

Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis  2

Backeberg´s photo Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis

This picture shows a seedgrown specimen that was sold through the SAB shop in Australia.

SAB Trichocereus Tarmaensis KK2148 Echinopsis tarmaensis knize

When looking at this pic, it gets obvious that this type is VERY similar to some types of Trichocereus cuzcoensis, and even has similarities to a KK242. I do not think that specimens of KK2148  could be recognized as such without knowing the label. They are simply synonymous with some types of Trichocereus cuzcoensis. This species grows at around 3000 meters altitude.

Trichocereus tarmaensis Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma  Photo: S. Preiss

Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis  Trichocereus.net

Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis  Trichocereus.net 2

Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis  Trichocereus.net 3

Below: Some photos from Tarma. The first one does not show a Trichocereus, but the others show some of the wild forms in between Trichocereus tarmaensis and Trichocereus knuthianus.

Columnar Cactus Cacti Tarma

Trichocereus tarmaensis Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Knuthianus

Trichocereus tarmaensis Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Knuthianus 2

Trichocereus tarmaensis Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Knuthianus 5

 

 

 

 

Trichocereus chiloensis (Echinopsis chiloensis) T.chilensis

Trichocereus chiloensis (Echinopsis chiloensis) T.chilensis

Trichocereus chiloensis, also known as Trichocereus chilensis or Echinopsis chiloensis, is a columnar cactus from Chile. It is closely related to Trichocereus terscheckii and something like the Chilean version of the large Andean Trichocereus species.

Current name:

Echinopsis chiloensis H.Friedrich & G.D.

Synonyms of T. chiloensis:

T. chilensis, T. chiloensis, Echinopsis chilensis, E. chiloensis, Cactus chiloensis, cereus chiloensis, Trichocereus skottsbergii, Trichocereus nigripilus, Echinopsis skottsbergii, Echinopsis nigripilus, Trichocereus spinibarbis. Trichocereus litoralis, Echinopsis litoralis, Trichocereus bolligerianus, Echinopsis bolligerianus

It´s debatable whether or not Trichocereus litoralis and Trichocereus coquimbanus are synonymous with Trichocereus chiloensis, but there is a clear connection and intermediates exist. 

Some people consider Eulychnia eburnea to be synonymous with Tr. chiloensis / E. chiloensis, but I disagree vehemently. The plants look kinda similar, but the flowers of them are very different and clearly belong to the genus Eulychnia.

This Trichocereus species is the predominant Trichocereus in Chile. The Name “chiloensis” is the taxonomically correct one, but there´s a very high chance this was typo as the name was supposed to mean”Chilean Trichocereus” and not “Trichocereus from Chiloe”. T. chilensis doesn not grow anywhere near the island of Chiloe. This makes the confusion around the name even more ridiculous. I understand that Taxonomy has to prefer the earliest name recorded, but in this case, the name Trichocereus chilensis should be ignored because it is the taxonomic equivalent of a typo.

Trichocereus chilensis grows from the Provence Talca in the south of Chile down to the Elqui Valley in the Provence Coquimbo in the north. There are various varieties and the maximum size of the plants varies greatly. Trichocereus chiloensis is one of the most typical cacti in Chile, grows like a tree and can get up to 6-7 meters tall. It grows as strong columns that reach a maximum diameter of 15 centimeters. The areoles are white/beige and up to 2 centimeters long. It has 10-12 radial spines that are up to 2 centimeters large and 2-4 middle spines. The middle spines are usually between 5-10 centimeters long-

Flower: The flower of Trichocereus chilensis is a little smaller than the ones on other Trichocereus species. It is between 8-14 centimeters long. The tube has very little hair on it and is 4-6 centimeters long, white petals (up to 5 centimeters long). Trichocereus chiloensis is a diurnal species, but the flowers tend to stay open for a very long time, sometimes even up late into the night so you might get the idea it is actually night flowering. There are many varieties or intermediates of Trichocereus chilensis, which grow all around the habitats and in the area where different types grow in the neighborhood of each other.

Varieties or regional forms:

Trichocereus chiloensis var. eburneus

Trichocereus chiloensis pantholipes

Trichocereus chiloensis borealis

Trichocereus chiloensis ssp. borealis Patrick Noll

Trichocereus chiloensis var. australis

Trichocereus chiloensis var. conjungens

Trichocereus chiloensis var. skottsbergii

Trichocereus skottsbergii Trichocereus chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes JN 380 Highway Fray Jorge, Coquimbo, Chile 269m

Trichocereus skottsbergii Trichocereus chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes JN 380 Highway Fray Jorge, Coquimbo, Chile 269m (2)

Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus chiloensis var. litoralis

Trichocereus chiloensis ssp. litoralis Pedro Lopez Artes

Trichocereus chiloensis ssp. litoralis Pedro Lopez Artes (2)

Pedro Lopez Artes

Cultivation of E. chiloensis:

Trichocereus chiloensis is a very tough cactus, just like many other cacti from Bolivian or Chilean deserts . They can take extreme heat and are very easy to grow. But they don’t like too much water, so you should never give too much water at once. They should only be watered in summer and require dry soil medium during the winter. Besides, they need a temperature change during the water in order to produce flowers. That means that you should overwinter Trichocereus chiloensis in a bright and well-ventilated room between October and April until there are no more night frosts. Trichocereus chiloensis is able to tolerate slight night frosts but the temperatures should not drop below -9° Celsius or you might lose the cactus. Apart from that, Trichocereus chiloensis is really easy and can thrive on very poor soil medium. I can recommend purely mineral soil mixes for them because they tend to rot when there is too much humus in the soil. A cactus that is kept in a mineral substrate can stay wet for much longer without any damage to the roots that one that is grown in a highly humus substrate.

Growing Trichocereus chiloensis from Seed: Trichocereus chiloensis is similarly easy from seed as any other Trichocereus. The seeds stay long for 5-10 years, though it´s best to use seeds that are not older than one year. The seeds need light to germinate and you usually sprinkle them on top of the soil and put the pot/sowing container in a room with a temperature between 25-30° Celsius for 2-6 weeks. If you still have no seedlings after 2-6 weeks, chances are that the seeds are not viable. There are not many suppliers for seed of Trichocereus chiloensis. 

Right now I have a terrific strain of Trichocereus chilensis ssp. litoralis in my shop. Check it out here. 

trichocereus chiloensis chilensis huntington botanical gardenTrichocereus Chilensis – Huntington Botanical Garden by Richard Hipp

Jimmy Baikovicius -Echinopsis_chiloensis_(2) Trichocereus chiloensis

Jimmy Baikovicius -Echinopsis_chiloensis_(2) Trichocereus chiloensis

Jimmy Baikovicius -Echinopsis_chiloensis

Jimmy Baikovicius Echinopsis_chiloensis_(1)

Jimmy Baikovicius -Echinopsis_chiloensis_(2) Trichocereus chiloensis 22

Jimmy Baikovicius Echinopsis_chiloensis

Echinopsis chiloensis by penarc_8 Trichocereus chiloensis chilensis

Echinopsis chilensis by penarc

Echinopsis chilensis by penarc

Echinopsis chiloensis Trichocereus chiloensis scott zona scott zona Chusquea_cumingii_by_Scott_Zona

by jorge barrios Echinopsis chiloensis Trichocereus chiloensisby jorge barrios Cactus Chile

Stan Shebs Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis chilensis

by Stan ShebsStan Shebs Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Chilensis

Stan Shebs Trichocereus_chiloensis

Stan Shebs Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Chilensis 2Stan shebs Trichocereus_chiloensis

milodon3 -Quisco Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Chilensismilodon3 -Quisco

pato novia Echinopsis chiloensis v. litoralis Trichocereus litoralis

pato novia Leucostele_chiloensis_(littoralis)

Raffi Kojian Gardenology.org-IMG_2370_Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis ChilensisRaffi Kojian Gardenology.org

Jason Hollinger Echinopsis chiloensis Trichocereus chiloensis Chilensis

Jason Hollinger Echiopsis_chiloensis

matthias ott Echinopsis chiloensis Trichocereus chiloensis flowermatthias ott Echinopsis_sp

Trichocereus chiloensis v. skottsbergii Echinopsis chiloensis Trichocereus chiloensis ssp. skottsbergii Pato_Novoa

milodon3 Photo flower trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis

milodon3 Echinopsis_Chiloensis

jason hollinger Photo flower of trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis

jason hollinger Echinopsis_chiloensisyazz Echinopsis chiloensis Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensisyazz Echinopsis_chiloensis_Yazz

penarc Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis flower collaby penarc Echinopsis_chiloensis_Colla

penarc Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensispenarc Echinopsis_chiloensis

daderot Echinopsis_chiloensis_-_Palmengarten_Frankfurt Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis

by daderot Echinopsis_chiloensis_-_Palmengarten_Frankfurtdaderot Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis Palmengarten Frankfurtdaderot Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis Botanical_Garden_in_Kaisaniemi,_Helsinki

daderot -Echinopsis_chiloensis_-_Botanical_Garden_in_Kaisaniemi,_Helsinki

dick culbert Photo flower of trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensisdick culbert Echinopsis_chiloensis

dick culbert Photo flower of trichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis

dick culbert Echinopsis_chiloensis_

Photo trichocereus chiloensis chilensis

Photos below: Trichocereus chilonsis Anda Collo Braulio Gonzales

Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Anda Collo Braulio Gonzales (4)Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Anda Collo Braulio Gonzales (2)

Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Anda Collo Braulio Gonzales (3)

Trichocereus chiloensis_v. longispinus from the Fields Collection (Rodni Kisar)

Photo Trichocereus chiloensis Rodni KisarTrichocereus chiloensis chilensis Echinopsis chiloensis Rodni Kisar

T.chiloensis (Pedro Lopez Artes)

Trichocereus chiloensis fruit Echinopsis chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes

E. chilensis v.longispinus (Rodni and Delia Kisar)

Trichocereus chiloensis v. longispinus from Fields Echinopsis chiloensis Rodni Kisar 2Trichocereus chiloensis v. longispinus from Fields Echinopsis chiloensis Rodni KisarTrichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Delia Kisar (3)    Photo by Michelle Killen, culture plant in the United States

Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Michelle Killen (2)

Chilensis v. longispinus Delia Kisar

Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Delia Kisar Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Delia Kisar (2)

Photo by Michelle Killen

Trichocereus chiloensis Echinopsis chiloensis Michelle Killen

Pedro Lopez Artes Trichocereus chiloensis Pedro Lopez ArtesTrichocereus chiloensis Pedro Lopez Artes (2) Photo: Jason Hollinger Trichocereus chiloensis ason Hollinger

If you want to see more photos of this species or enjoyed this free article, please join our Trichocereus Facebook group or Instagram.

Also check out our other articles in our Trichocereus species database.

The history of the PC Cactus / PC Trichocereus clone

Trichocereus deserticolus / Echinopsis deserticola

Trichocereus glaucus – Echinopsis glauca

Trichocereus glaucus – Echinopsis glauca

Trichocereus glaucus, also known as Echinopsis glauca, is a Peruvian Trichocereus species described by Friedrich Ritter.

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Friedrich Ritter original photo

Friedrich Ritter original photo

Trichocereus glaucus – Foto: Friedrich Ritter

Origin of Trichocereus glaucus:

Peru ( South Peru ), Arequipa (Rio Tambo), Chile. In Chile, this plant is closely related to Trichocereus fulvilanus and Trichocereus deserticolus.

Description of Trichocereus glaucus / Echinopsis glauca:

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Auxin photo

Trichocereus glaucus can get between 1,5-2 meters tall and is a prostrate/creeping species that you often find hanging down slopes and cliffs. This trait is very distinct in the variety Trichocereus glaucus var. pendens. The color of the skin is very glaucous and small specimens look absolutely like the type of plants that are labeled Trichocereus macrogonus / Echinopsis macrogona today.  Spiny, dark blue versions from the complex around T. peruvianus. However, macrogonus grows columnar while this species tends to bend over with age. New growth is very glaucous.

Areoles of Echinopsis glauca:

The areoles are dark brown to gray in color and approximately 2,5 centimeters apart of each other. Similar to other plants related to Trichocereus peruvianus, the plant has a diameter of up to 10 centimeters and the areoles are gray felted. The spines look a bit like the ones on Trichocereus cuzcoensis and old growth has a typical satin white glow that is common on this species. Trichocereus glaucus has 6-9 ribs, 3-6 middle spines and 8-11 radial spines. The middle spines are 5-10 centimeters and the radial spines 1-2 centimeters long.  New spine growth is black to brown and turns gray with age.

Flowers of T. glaucus:

White, just like almost every other Trichocereus from this complex. The diameter is very variable and usually is between 15-22 centimeters. Trichocereus glaucus is a night-flowering species with green, round fruits. However, the hairy flowers usually stay open until the next morning.

Fruit of E. glauca:

Round, green, and 3 centimeters thick.

Type locality: Lower part of the Rio Tambo in the department Arequipa.

Trichocereus glaucus is very similar to Trichocereus chalaensis and grows in a similar way. We think that Trichocereus chalaensis might be synonymous with Ritter´s Trichocereus glaucus. Ritter´s field number of Trichocereus glaucus was FR270. We distributed seeds of Trichocereus glaucus various times in the past and all ended up amazingly beautiful. It´s a very nice species.

Buy Trichocereus glaucus seeds:

Trichocereus glaucus aka Echinopsis glauca is extremely rare and most plants on the market will probably come labeled as “Trichocereus peruvianus” or “Trichocereus macrogonus”. It is common occurence for some Peruvian cactus collectors to label all glaucous Trichocereus species with this name. This is obviously wrong and causes chaos. We sometimes have plants of this species in our Trichocereus Facebook group, which can be found here: https://facebook.com/groups/trichocereus

Cultivation of Echinopsis glauca:

Trichocereus glaucus is a very resilient grower and likes to be watered well in summer. In winter, they should be kept as dry as possible at around 10° Celsius. Seed germinates very well and the plant is usually very tough. That´s also caused by its drought tolerance, which is very typical for these kinds of plants. The species will probably tolerate temperatures between -5° to -7° Celsius over very short time, but I would not stress it and this also depends on many other factors, like general health and dryness. I would recommend keeping at no lower than 10° Celsius in winter.

Varieties of E. glauca: Trichocereus glaucus var. pendens. This variety does only grow hanging down cliffs and small hills. This variety only grows at one location in Chile and is extremely rare. This local population is in the south of Arica, Camarca in Chile. Backeberg suggested that this would be his Trichocereus uyumpaensis, but Friedrich Ritter vehemently disagreed with that. More information is necessary about this topic.

Below: Trichocereus Glaucus – Fotos: Auxin

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Auxin photo 2

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Auxin photo EG4

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Auxin photo EG3

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Auxin photo EG2

Translation of Ritter´s description (loosely)

This species forms shrubs the size of 1 – 2 meters and often several meters in diameter, sprouting mainly from shoots that lay sideways on the ground. This plant rarely pups from the top or upper parts. The shoots are 5 – 8 inches thick, erect, later lying in the lower parts, the new shoot blue-green, later gray-green.

Ribs: 7-9, very broad, obtuse, 7.5 to 13 mm high, 15-25 mm wide, notched, with transverse furrows that do not reach down to the separating grooves of the ribs,
areoles: grey felted, 1/2-3/4 inches in diameter, 1 to 2 inches free removal, let down by the humps in the notches
Spines: In the new shoot black to brown, becoming gray, straight, rigid
Marginal spines: 7-10, directed laterally, the lower and lateral 8 to 15 mm long, coarse needle-shaped, somewhat flattened, the upper the upper stronger and not sharply separated from the Central spines.
Central spines: 3-6, very spread apart, subulate in the middle, but usually closer to the top edge and almost in the position of an edge of spine, below 1.5 mm thick
Flower: Not far from the apex, 13 to 19 centimeters long, fragrant, opening in the evening, the morning still open,
Ovary: Green with fleshy green, narrowly triangular, 2-5 mm long, pointed scales and large scales raised bases. The flowers are covered with brown/black hairs.
Partition against the nectar chamber 3-4 mm thick, tube-shaped, 13 to 23 mm long, to the stylus 1to 2 mm wide, brownish, almost openly, with nectar

Tubes:

In addition funnel shaped, 40-65 mm long, the top 2 to 3 cm wide, pale green interior, exterior gray-green, with triangular points, 7.5 to 10 mm long, dark green scales and tufts of hair as on the ovary.
Stamens: white, greenish below, insertions missing on the top 2 to 3 centimeters of the tube to a ring on the hem, pouch pale brown, approximately at half height petals standing
Stylus: pale green, white or pale brownish above, 10 to 11 cm in length, with 14 to 18 mm fall on the 13-16 spread pale yellow stigma lobes, between the pouches or outstanding.

 

German original description / Deutsche Original Beschreibung:

Büsche von 1 meter bis 2 meter höhe und oft mehreren Metern Durchmesser, sprossend hauptsächlich unten von liegenden Trieben, weniger oben sprossend. Triebe 5 bis 8 Zentimeter dick, aufrecht, später in den unteren Teilen liegend, im Neutrieb blaugrün, später mehr graugrün.
Rippen: 7-9, sehr breit, stumpf, 7,5 bis 13 mm hoch, 15 bis 25 mm breit, gekerbt, mit Querfurchen, die nicht bis zu den Trennfurchen der Rippen hinabreichen,
Areolen: Graufilzig, 1/2-3/4 Zentimeter Durchmesser, 1bis 2 Zentimeter freie Entfernung, , von den Höckern in die Kerben hinabreichend
Stacheln: Im Neutrieb schwarz bis braun, , vergrauend, gerade, starr
Randstacheln: 7 bis 10, seitlich gerichtet, die unteren und seitlichen 8 bis 15 mm lang, derb nadelförmig, etwas abgeflacht, die oberen die Oberen stärker und nicht scharf von den Mittelstacheln gesondert.
Mittelstacheln: 3 bis 6, sehr gespreizt, pfriemlich in der Mitte, aber meist näher dem oberen Rand und fast in der Stellung eines Randstachels, unten 1,5 mm dick
Blüte: Nicht weit weg vom Scheitel, 13 bis 19 zentimeter lang, duftend, abends öffnend, morgens noch offen,  
Fruchtknoten: Grün mit fleischigen grünen, schmal dreieckigen, 2-5 mm langen spitzen Schuppen und großen erhabenen Schuppenbasen. Mit starken schwarzen oder braunschwarzen Wollhaaren.
Trennwand gegen die Nektarkammer 3-4 mm dick, diese tubisch, 13 bis 23 mm lang,um den Griffel 1bis 2 mm weit, bräunlich, fast offen, mit Nektar

Röhren: Darüber trichterig, 40 bis 65 mm lang, oben 2 bis 3 cm weit, innen blaß grünlich , außen graugrün, mit dreieckigen Spitzen, 7,5 bis 10 mm langen dunkelgrünen Schuppen und Haarbüscheln wie auf dem Fruchtknoten.
Staubfäden: weiß, unten grünlich, Insertionen fehlen auf den obersten 2 bis 3 Zentimetern der Röhre, bis auf einen Ring auf dem Saum, Beutel blassbraun, etwa bei halber Petalen Höhe stehend
Griffel: blassgrün, oben weiß oder blass bräunlich, 10 bis 11 cm lang, wovon 14 bis 18 mm auf die 13-16 gespreizten blaßgelben Narbenäste  fallen, zwischen den Beuteln oder sie überragend.

Photos of Trichocereus glaucus / Echinopsis glauca

Trichocereus glaucus Sacred Succulents Jeffrey Alaback (2)

Jeff Alaback / The version of Trichocereus glaucus from Sacred Succulents

Trichocereus glaucus Sacred Succulents Jeffrey Alaback

Jeff Alaback

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Patrick Noll 2

Patrick Noll

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Wild Andes Jeremy Jones

Jeremy Jones

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Wild Andes Jeremy Jones (4) 2

Jeremy Jones

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Wild Andes Jeremy Jones (3)

Jeremy Jones

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Wild Andes Jeremy Jones (2)

Jeremy Jones

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Patrick Noll

Patrick Noll

Trichocereus glaucus KK336 Delia Kisar (3)

Delia Kisar

Trichocereus glaucus KK336 Delia Kisar (2)

Delia Kisar

Trichocereus glaucus KK336 Delia Kisar

Delia Kisar

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Sams Plants (2)

Sams Plants

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Sams Plants

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Sebastian Preiss

Sebastian Preiss

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca KK336

Patrick Noll

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Rodni Kisar

Rodni Kisar

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca v. pendens Cactus Affinity

Cactus Affinity T. glaucus v. pendens

Trichocereus glaucus Echinopsis glauca Sams Plants (3)

Sams Plants

In comparison to this species, check out closely related species:

Trichocereus chalaensis Cactus Affinity Echinopsis chalaensis

Trichocereus chalaensis Cactus Affinity Echinopsis chalaensis

 

Trichocereus deserticolus Leonora Enking Echinopsis deserticola

Trichocereus deserticolus Leonora Enking Echinopsis deserticola

 

Trichocereus fulvilanus Michael Wolf Echinopsis fulvilana

Trichocereus fulvilanus Michael Wolf Echinopsis fulvilana

Trichocereus shaferi (Echinopsis shaferi)

Trichocereus shaferi (Echinopsis shaferi)

The name Trichocereus shaferi was described by Britton and Rose in the 1920s and lacked some important information. However, there were some later descriptions by Friedrich Ritter, Curt Backeberg/Rauh and Werdermann that went more into detail.

Trichocereus shaferi pups from the base and reaches a size of 1-1,5 meters. The plant grows halfway prostrate or leaning over and has between 15 and 20 ribs. Britton and Rose gave an average number of 12 ribs, which is dramatically different from the data that were given in later descriptions. The maximum diameter is 5-12 centimeters and the color is a gray/dark green, which you can very well see on the pictures that were provided by Trout. The ribs are 0,5-1 centimeters high and there are substantial furrows .

The areoles on Trichocereus shaferi are white felted and 1-6 mm in diameter and up to 1,2 centimeters apart of each other.

Spines: The spines of Trichocereus shaferi are yellow, very fine and needle-like with a slightly dark-brown tip. It has 7-10 radial spines (up to 1 cm long) and 1-3 middle spines (1-2 cm).

Flower: Very round flower. White. Trichocereus shaferi flowers from the upper part/apex and Britton and Rose gave a size of 15-18 cm.

Fruit: The fruit has very dominant white hairs, as you can beautifully see on the second picture. The edible fruit is round and 3-5 cm in diameter. Green in color with reddish/green scales.

Origin: Ritter encountered this plant near Leon near Jujuy at around 1500-1800 meters growing on rocky slopes. Britton and Rose gave San Lorenzo in the provence Salta at 1800 meters as the location of the typus. Ritter considered his collection in jujuy to be a regional variety but didnt really follow up on it. His collection name was FR41 and there is a large number of seeds that gotten into the collections of cactus fans all around the world.

Where to buy seeds and plants of Trichocereus shaferi? Well, it´s rare and you might come across them on eBay. Like I already mentioned before, I bought a large plant with this name a few years ago and we´re waiting for it to flower next year. Some seed stores and cactus nurseries have them in stock every once in a while, but it´s a rather rare species and it´s not available from South America. I am sure there are some collectors that offer seeds from their collections sometimes, but it´s probably a little bit hard to find and luck has a lot to do with it. If I´d be looking for this species, I´d write emails to Kakteen Haage, Kakteen Uhlig, Succeed, Sacred Succulents and hope for the best. You can also try making a post in our Trichocereus Facebook group but I´ve never really encountered one there. But it cant hurt to ask.

Trichocereus shaferi Echinopsis shaferi

Trichocereus shaferi Echinopsis shaferi 2

 

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Current name: Echinopsis arboricola (Kimnach) Mottram

Origin: Bolivia, Argentina, Type locality: Tarija in Bolivia, 600-1000 meters altitude

Trichocereus arboricola is more of an Epiphyte instead of a normal Trichocereus and is often grown like a hanging basket cactus. It often starts off as a columnar cactus, but goes prostrate as soon as it reaches a certain size. You can grow it in a hanging basket or like a columnar Trichocereus.

It’s a very tender cactus with a shiny, bright green color and very thin, needle-like spines. It can reach a total size of more than a meter and up to 5 centimeters in diameter. It usually has 10+ ribs and has very small, very subtle bumps over the areoles, which are slightly felted. The areoles are up to 5 mm apart from each other. It develops aerial roots and has very fine hair on the areoles. Trichocereus arboricola has between 10-16 spines, which are very thin and similar to the spines on some Cleistocactus species.

Trichocereus arboricola is a night flowering species and has a very beautiful flower, which is very large for its size and white in color. It has a very delicate and noble flower.

Trichocereus arboricola is a fairly new species and was described in 1997. Because of that, it’s not included in many old cactus books.

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Copyright: Trichocereus.net

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Trichocereus arboricola (Echinopsis arboricola)

Copyright: K.Trout, troutsnotes.com

 

Trichocereus schoenii / Echinopsis schoenii

Trichocereus schoenii / Echinopsis schoenii

Trichocereus schoenii , also known as Echinopsis schoenii under current nomenclature, is a south Peruvian Trichocereus species that Backeberg described and named after E. Schön, who assisted him financially on his trips. Mr. Schön was from Arequipa, which is where one of the most important habitats of this species is. However, the species is not limited to that area and grows nearby other South Peruvian Trichocereus species. Trichocereus schoenii usually grows in the company of some Corryocactus species and there are also some other Trichocereus species that grow at the same sites.

Trichocereus schoenii resembles Trichocereus santaensis, but differs from it by the long central spine and a slightly different areole shape and rib shape. You need to look very closely to tell them apart, and it´s usually the typical spination that allows you to recognize it as what it is. It´s a very rare and beautiful species which is very rare in cultivation. The plants that are available are usually mislabeled and are usually identified as Trichocereus cuzcoensis or Trichocereus knuthianus.

Trichocereus schoenii is a plant that roughly belongs to the Trichocereus cuzcoensis complex, but there are many differences and I hope to see some cladistic studies about this species one day. The species usually has seven ribs (as seen in the photos) and the spines can get up to 8 centimeters long. You can read a more detailed description including some habitat photos in my book.

Trichocereus schoenii / Echinopsis schoenii photos from South Peru
Photos: Mark Harvey

Copyright: Mark Harvey

 

 

Trichocereus schoenii Echinopsis schoenii

Echinopsis macrogona in Matucana II: Photos from the habitat

Echinopsis macrogona in Matucana II: Photos from the habitat

In this chapter I want to show you some of the wild populations of Echinopsis macrogona from Matucana.

Echinopsis macrogona / Trichocereus macrogonus Huariquina in Matucana

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 3

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 6

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 8

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 30

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 12

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 10

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 13

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 16

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 19

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 21

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 27

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 26

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Huariquina Matucana Peruvianus 23

 

Copyright: Chavin Herbalists

Echinopsis macrogona / Trichocereus macrogonus Pomolargo

Echinopsis macrogona / Trichocereus macrogonus Collana Roja in Matucana

Copyright: Chavin Herbalists

Echinopsis macrogona / Trichocereus macrogonus Collana Pichu in Matucana

 

Copyright: Chavin Herbalists

Echinopsis macrogona / Trichocereus macrogonus Sucro in Matucana

Echinopsis macrogona Trichocereus macrogonus Sucro in Matucana Trichocereus peruvianus 3

Echinopsis macrogona Trichocereus macrogonus Sucro in Matucana Trichocereus peruvianus 2

Copyright: Chavin Herbalists

 

The history of the PC Trichocereus clone – Predominant cultivar


The history of the PC Trichocereus clone – Predominant cultivar

I wanted to clarify some things about the PC Trichocereus clone. What it is, where it probably is from and what it isnt. The name is probably the most overused name in the history of Trichocereus culture. I personally hate it and spent days discussing the whole situation with friends or interested people in the Trichocereus Facebook group. If you hear the word PC in a Trichocereus group, JUST RUN. Log off, go outside and be in your garden. Still, if you actually wonder what those guys are actually talking about, I am happy to shed some light on this issue. Please keep in mind that I hate to use the name of this cultivar, strain or whatever you might want to call it and I will only mention this one time and one time only.

What does PC stands for? It originally means PREDOMINATE CULTIVAR. However, PREDOMINANT CULTIVAR would probably be more appropriate.

PC Trichocereus pachanoi

Photo: moonunitbotanica.com / PC Trichocereus in Australia

Forest & Kim Starr_070320-5800_Echinopsis_pachanoiPC Trichocereus in a garden. Photo: Forest & Kim Starr

Now what is it really and is this all BS?

It is a clone, but there also are other plants grown from seeds that are probably coming from the same site this clone is coming from too. In California and parts of the USA, this clone is really common around parks, schools or gardens. It is very similar to most other San pedros, but it originally comes from Bolivia. This plant was originally collected by Friedrich Ritter and described as Trichocereus riomizquensis.

Trichocereus Riomizquensis 335This is the original photo from Ritter´s book. Do you see the white hairs on the flower and the way the areoles look? Well, keep in mind. You will need it later. Ritters official collection name of this plant was Trichocereus riomizquensis FR856 and they originally comes from Chyllas.

The original site is the Rio Mizque and we and my friends from Sacred Succulents visited the original site a couple of times.  It is extremely similar to Trichocereus pachanoi, but differs in substantial points like the hairs on the flowers and the overall rib structure. Though it is common belief that the San Pedro cactus aka Trichocereus pachanoi grows in Bolivia, all the San Pedro related plants we ever came across IN THE WILD either belonged to Trichocereus bridgesii or Trichocereus scopulicola. That also applies to the regional type from the Rio Mizque. I have all kinds of photos of those plants on the pages about Trichocereus riomizquensis and I don´t want to repeat this information here again.
This is a long-spined version of this but there also are a lot of short-spined ones on that site. I seen them. Just like this PC, they have 6-7 ribs, those weird areoles and golden spines without swollen spine bases. Overall, they are just a short-spined version of Trichocereus bridgesii.

Let me just say that one thing that the Bolivian Trichocereus species have in common is their drought resistance. They literally live in a hot desert and are a lot more resistant to drought than Trichocereus pachanoi or some of the other Peruvian San Pedros. And that´s where I want to draw the line directly to this Californian clone. Clones & cultivars are not humbug or bullshit….cultivars exist in EVERY field of commercial cultivation and everyone who tells you different is a fool. One such cultivar is actually this Tr. riomizquensis that was originally described by Friedrich Ritter. Is is extremely drought resistant and manages to thrive in the Californian climate. That´s why this plant is literally everywhere there. We tested it numerous times…almost none of those Californian plants were able to mate with each other…simply because they were genetically identical and cuttings of each other. I seen whole nurseries filled up with them because they are so damn easy to grow. They just cut them in small pieces and stick them into the ground. And after five years, they sell it for 30-100 bucks. All those plants share the same flower characteristics and are closer to Trichocereus bridgesii than they are to Trichocereus pachanoi. They are covered with white hairs, which is absolutely typical for Trichocereus bridgesii. I know a Bolivian Trichocereus species when I see one…and this PC is one without a doubt.

The flowers of the PC:

PC Flower_7

Do you see all those white hairs? Good, because it´s important to differentiate between certain Trichocereus species. Trichocereus pachanoi tends to have black or brown hairs, while this PC has white hairs. And that´s typical for the Bolivian San Pedro strains.

pcPachBudDSC_0462Those two photos are from Misplant.net! Check out their seeds because they are amazing.
Well, just compare the photos and see for yourself. The top photo is the flower bud of this PC Trichocereus and the lower one is a bud on a Trichocereus scopulicola. They are at different stages in their development, but I am sure you see the similarity in the important parts. And the same applies to the flower on Trichocereus bridgesii, which is another Bolivian Trichocereus.
Scopulicola5a

Scop from Misplant.net

Alright, now that we have this out of the way let me just say that the whole internet started having shitty discussions about the PC and what not. Most of the times, those guys just pick out one of the charasteristics of those plants and call  everything that resembles this Californian strain a PC…which is a really bad generalization. Imagine you were a botanist and field explorer that collected seeds in Bolivia. Now you find a cool regionality that produced a whole lot of seeds. Friedrich Ritter was this guy and collected so many seeds that he could populate the whole world with them…which he probably did. He sold his seeds through his Winter Samenlisten (which were written in three languages) and shipped them everywhere. Like literally. People grew them, raised those plants and planted them in their gardens. Some in California, some in Australia and some in other places of the world. That PC clone from California and the rest of the USA is probably just one cutting that was grown from those seeds. All the plants cloned from this one plant are genetically identical. But that doesn´t mean there can´t be more plants grown from the same seeds…which in fact are genetically diverse. You know, this whole site at the Rio Mizque is pretty big and as far as I know, Ritter collected loads of fruits. These days, most labels are lost but what´s left are the plants. And they are usually slapped with a short PC comment in the Facebook groups, though that is only a tiny piece of the puzzle.

And just to make sure this posting here is not misinterpreted. Are all the plants called PC the same? NO, absolutely not. Many people throw this word around and have absolutely no idea what they are talking about. Just one example. Here is a Bolivian San Pedro. As those are also related to Trichocereus bridgesii, they have a similar rib structure. Imagine them with long golden spines and you are good to go.

Trichocereus riomizquensisTr. aff pachanoi in BolivaSan Pedro in BolivaTrichocereus aff. pachanoi in Boliva

Well, okay. I want to come to and end but it´s important to make a very good point. YES, there are many San Pedros that are extremely similar to this clone. Not all of them are the same and I am sure there´s a fair amount that has absolutely nothing to do with this PC. But there IS a common clone in the USA (apart from the many other cultivars that are there, such as the three or four types of cereus monstrosa or all the other mutants that are currently flooding ebay. Nurseries are in the money business and they will replicate everything they can sell. And those Bolivian Trichos (and I count that PC in as well) are TAH (Tough as hell). You literally stick them in the ground and they grow. And that played a part in the fact that this PC Trichocereus strain is so common in some parts of the USA.

Alright, I want to sum this up. Everyone is a bit in the right here. The way this plant is discussed recently is out of control. And some people tend to forget that there is a huge number of plants that are really similar to this PC…and they are coming from the habitats. In Peru, there are similar plants and I just posted the examples that you can find in Bolivia as well. But that doesn´t mean that those plants were just invented by cookoo internet theoreticians. They were collected, sold and commercially cultivated. This plant does probably NOT come from Backeberg, which is another theory that was discussed heavily.

Fed vs UnfedThis is a nice Pic that shows the difference between Fed and Unfed PC Trichocereus

PC Cutting flower_1

Trichocereus PC Flower

TRICHOCEREUS VOLUME 2 available now! Echinopsis book


TRICHOCEREUS VOLUME 2 available now! Echinopsis book

The moment we´ve all been waiting for is here. The new Echinopsis book TRICHOCEREUS VOLUME 2: SAN PEDRO HYBRIDS as well as the bonus content can officially be ordered through our shop.  First come, first served. I don´t wanna talk around the bushes for too long….check out our funky Trichocereus link.

https://trichocereus.net/product/new-book-trichocereus-volume-2-echinopsis-cactus-cacti

We put together an incredible sales page with lots of bonus content and here´s a preview of the things that await you. All covers are subject to change because they arent final yet.

 

The Trichocereus Books / Echinopsis book

Trichocereus books Volume 1+2 bundle Echinopsis book cactusbook

The Limited Trichocereus.net Promo Shirts

Exclusively made for this campaign. All shirts are printed on demand and only available in tiny quantities. In this edition we´ll only print as many as we sell through Indiegogo.

 

Cactus Shirts Trichocereus tshirts cacti echinopsis book

The Limited Trichocereus.net Postcard Set

Exclusively made for this campaign. This 8 Postcard Set (+ one Bonus card) is printed on demand and for now these will only be available through Indiegogo now.

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The Special Edition Book – Alternate Cover

Trichocereus book Volume 2 Hybrids, Clones and Cultivars Echinopsis book

The Special Edition Box Set – Including one Shirt, the Postcard Set and the Special Edition Book

Trichocereus books Volume 1+2 bundle Echinopsis book cactusbook 33

 

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