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Tag: Soehrensia

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Trichocereus smrzianus / Echinopsis smrziana

Trichocereus smrzianus / Echinopsis smrziana

Backeberg described Trichocereus smrzianus / Echinopsis smrziana in his KAKTUS ABC, a book that did not get a very wide release. Besides the description is highly controversial because it basically re-describes various forms of Echinopsis schickendantzii / Trichocereus schickendantzii and Trichocereus walteri that are barely on the level of a regional form.

Synonyms: Trichocereus smrzianus, Soehrensia smrziana, Soehrensia smrzianus, Echinopsis smrzianus, Echinopsis smrziana, Trichocereus schickendantzii, Echinopsis schickendantzii, Trichocereus walteri, Echinopsis walteri, etc.

Origin of Trichocereus smrzianus:

Argentina, Salta

Description of Echinopsis smrziana:

This species grows alone or in groups of larger clusters. It has a large, round body and reaches a maximum diameter of 2 meters and can get up to 60-70 centimeters tall. The plant is extremely variable and can grow like a clustering cactus like Trichocereus schickendantzii or in a columnar way, very similar to Trichocereus spachianus. It has 10-15 ribs and only grows at one location, which was also described as the type locality. T.smrzianus is extremely rare, though it is sometimes available on the commercial and sometimes shows up in cactus collections. The fact that the plant has so many ribs, makes it distinguishable from plants like Trichocereus candicans or Trichocereus spachianus. Young plants can look almost identical though, which is why identification of this species should not be done on juvenile plants. The bigger the plants, the broader the ribs are, what gives it a very typical Soehrensia look and it looks much closer to Soehrensia than to Trichocereus.

Spines of T.smrzianus:

The very thin spines are usually yellow to white. Plants have 8-15 spines on one areole, but Trichocereus smrzianus is extremely variable, what makes it so hard to ID. If you encounter the plants in the field it should be fairly easy to identify because it only grows on one location in Chachipampa, Argentina. It has 1-4 middle spines that are up to 3 centimeters long.

Flowers of E.smrziana:

Trichocereus smrzianus has white flowers, almost identical to the ones on T. schickendantzii. Overall it is a form of the latter, which means it is very hard to distinguish it from it. The plant flowers from the upper part of the body, what you can see on the featured image very well. The flowers get between 10-20 centimeters long and look very similar to the ones on Trichocereus tarijensis.

Fruit:

Trichocereus smrzianus has a round, green fruit that is between 2-5 centimeters in diameter and tastes very nicely. The name is a really bad example of how a name should not be. Not sure how it sounds in your language but in mine it sounds like having a seizure while biting your tongue off.
The taxonomic status of this group of plants was very inconsistent and due to the fact that there is a relationship to the genus Soehrensia, taxonomists have moved them back and forth from Trichocereus to, Soehrensia and Echinopsis now. After the merger with Echinopsis, taxonomy went full circle and re-declared Soehrensia as an accepted genus and it seems like it might stay like that. However, the plant is definitely close to Trichocereus schickendantzii and it´s definitely possible that Trichocereus smrzianus is just a natural hybrid between Trichocereus schickendantzii and a different species like Trichocereus tarijensis, or a regional form of the Trichocereus schickendantzii group.

Trichocereus smrzianus, Echinopsis smrziana Emőke Dénes Schickendantzii Kew_Gardens_1Emőke Dénes Echinopsis_smrziana_-_Kew_Gardens

Trichocereus smrzianus, Echinopsis smrziana Schickendantzii Oslo Sukkulentforening Soehrensia_smrzianaOslo Sukkulentforening Soehrensia_smrziana

by Michael Wolf Trichocereus smrzianus Echinopsis smrziana Schickendantzii

by Michael Wolf Echinopsis smrziana

by Michael Wolf Trichocereus smrzianus Echinopsis smrziana Schickendantzii

Photos below: Trichocereus smrzianus by Leanne Kelly

Trichocereus smrzianus Echinopsis smrziana Leanne Kelly (4)

Leanne Kelly

Trichocereus smrzianus Echinopsis smrziana Leanne Kelly (4)

Leanne Kelly (4)

Trichocereus smrzianus Echinopsis smrziana Leanne Kelly (3)

Leanne Kelly (3)

Trichocereus smrzianus Echinopsis smrziana Leanne Kelly (3)

Leanne Kelly

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Trichocereus strigosus / Echinopsis strigosa

Trichocereus strigosus / Echinopsis strigosa

Trichocereus strigosus is a plant from the genus Trichocereus. Its status is questionable and it is sometimes also listed as Soehrensia strigosa. I treat it as a correct species in the genus Trichocereus. It is closely related to Trichocereus vatteri and only differs from it by the flowers. Visually, both species are very hard to differentiate and are mostly synonymous.

Synonyms: Cereus strigosus, Echinopsis strigonus, Cereus myriophyllus, Trichocereus strigonus,

This plant grows in direct neighborhood of Trichocereus candicans and was cataloged by Gilles in 1833. But back then, the plant was not described until 1834 when Salm-Dyck took the effort to write a complete description. Trichocereus strigosus and Trichocereus candicans both grow around Mendoza. The original name was Cereus Myriophyllus (Gilles) but it was changed to Trichocereus strigosus because it was based on a nomen nudum and that´s why Salm-Dyck´s description has priority over the older name Cereus Myriophyllus.

Flower: Up to 20 centimeters large, white. Trichocereus strigosus is a night flowering species. It also is self-sterile, what means that you need pollen from another donor to produce seeds. Please not that there is a white form of Trichocereus strigosus. The white flowering variety of this plant grows at around 1600 meters altitude. The plant is pupping from the base and only reaches around 60-65 centimeters in height.

Ribs: Trichocereus strigosus has 15-20 ribs and the shoots have a maximum diameter of 5-8 centimeters.

The areoles are white/beige felted and reach a maximum diameter of 5 mm. Every areole are approximately 3-6 mm apart from each other.

Spines: Yellow, very thin and fine spines, up to 3 centimeters long, 10-15 radial spines and 2-5 middle spines that can get up to 5,5 centimeters long. The plant has very long and fierce spines.

In addition, there are some other forms/varieties. One of them was originally known as Trichocereus strigosus var. flaviflorus and only occurs in Famatina, Province La Rioja in Argentina. This type has a yellow flower and is day flowering. The flowers are between 12-14 centimeters large. The yellow flowering variety grows a couple hundred meters below the white flowering one. In addition, the yellow flower is shorter.

Cultivation: The species is very rare in cultivation, though it sometimes shows up in cactus collections all around the world. The plant should be kept relatively dry, though it can be watered in the summer when it´s pretty hot. As it grows in the neighborhood of Trichocereus candicans, it requires similar conditions. Trichocereus strigosus likes getting a fair amount of sun light but shouldn´t be baked in full sun all day long. They usually grow in semi-shade and can form amazing clusters.

Winter protection and frost tolerance: Trichocereus strigosus is able to take a light amount of frost but everything lower than -5° Celsius is dangerous and can lead to permanent damage or death. Plants need to be kept completely dry if the temperatures drop below 10° Celsius/50° Fahrenheit and it´s best to keep them in a bright, well ventilated area. The minimum average temperature is 10° Celsius.

Seed germination: The seed germinates very easy, if it´s actually fresh. Especially with those rarer Trichos, there are problems regarding the viability of the seeds. I think Succeed has them in stock too and if possible, ask the seller in advance if he knows how old the seed is. That´s a good rule of thumb anyway and these days, I do it for all my seed orders.

Trichocereus strigosus / Echinopsis strigosa Ryan Somma“Echinopsis strigosa” by Ryan Somma

Echinopsis_strigosa_(8417473500)Vela de la Virgen, Trichocereus strigosa, La Rioja desert – Picture “Echinopsis strigosa by Dick Culbert –

1280px-Echinopsis_strigosa

Echinopsis strigosa” by Ryan Somma – Echinopsis strigosa

soehrensia_strigosa-pam-fray

Photo Credit: Pam Fray

Trichocereus strigosus strigonus Echinopsis strigosa Trichocereus IMG 4721.scale 400 Trichocereus strigosus strigonus Echinopsis strigosa 3 Trichocereus strigosus strigonus Echinopsis strigosa 4



 

Trichocereus Lookalikes

Trichocereus Lookalikes

There are various columnar cacti that you can encounter. And though many look very much like Trichocereus on the first look, many of them actually aren´t. This page is about the many lookalikes that are available on the open market. Some of them are labeled “Trichocereus” and some of them aren´t. It includes many plants that were originally collected by seed collectors and field botanists who made a description without having seen the flowers. Because despite the fact that many columnar cacti can be very similar to Trichocereus in their looks, the flowers are what´s usually the biggest help to find out more about the origin of a plant.

Soehrensia

Soehrensias are very similar to Trichocereus. However, most of them stay small, have way too many ribs or a different flower. In addition to that, some of them (like Soehrensia formosa) are very broad and thick. Soehrensias were integrated into the genus Echinopsis, until DNA testing revealed that they are very different in regards to their genetic profile. Because of that, they are regarded a real genus again.

I have no idea which soehrensia this is but it´s definitely not a Trichocereus and Soehrensia comes closest.

HPIM2285

HPIM2283

GYMNANTHOCEREUS CHLOROCARUS

This genus is not really a genus anymore and those plants were moved into the genus Browningia. The current name of the species shown is Browningia chlorocarpa. Other former Gymnanthocerei are now called Browningia altissima (Gymnanthocereus altissimus), Browningia Pilleifera (Gymnanthocereus pilleifer). There always was taxonomic chaos surrounding those plants and very few pictures exist. The flowers are usually a lot smaller than the ones on Trichocereus and vary in many more aspects.

Origin: Huancabamba and Abra Porculla. Ritters collection Number was FR 290. This species was also called Seticereus Chlorocarpus. If you have pics of any former Gymnanthocereus species, please let me know because I´d love to have more of them on the site.

Rauhocereus

This genus is extremely interesting and I am constantly looking for new pics or seeds of Rauhocereus species. The most popular one is Rauhocereus Riosanijiensis. There are´t many sources where you can buy seeds or plants. The breeder misplant sold a couple seedgrown Rauhocereus last year but I am not sure if he will get some more.

-Rauhocereus_riosaniensis Michael Wolf

Rauhocereus Riosaniensis – Picture: Michael Wolf

Peter A Mansfeld Rauhocereus_riosaniensis_pm

Rauhocereus Riosaniensis – Peter A. MansfeldBrowningia_riosaniensis_-_DaderotRauhocereus Riosanienjis Palmengarten Frankfurt – Daderot

I will also add pics and descriptions of Azureocereus. Erdisia, Weberbauerocereus, Coryocactus, Lobivias Echinopsis and many more. If you have pics of a plant that would fit on this page, please write me on the Trichocereus Facebook group. I will constantly update this page.