Tag: Sacred Succulents

Trichocereus riomizquensis RITTER (Echinopsis)

Trichocereus riomizquensis RITTER (Echinopsis)

Trichocereus riomizquensis is a Bolivian Trichocereus species that is closely related to Trichocereus bridgesii. I count it as a close relative and potential regional form of Trichocereus bridgesii, which is only endemic to one site in Bolivia near the Rio Mizque.
The species was discovered and described by the German cactus field botanist Friedrich Ritter, who gave Chuyllas as the type locality and described it growing on steep slopes in the province Campero.

His Field Number was FR 856. Friedrich Ritter was one of the leading Cactus experts of his time and successfully ran a seed shop, in which he sold this species as seed to people all over the world. Trichocereus riomizquensis was also visited during the Sacred Succulents Fieldtrips and they found a couple of different types growing around that area.

In Ritter´s book, he published a photo of this species. Unfortunately this photo is not very good and it is one of the species that are rare in cultivation. Almost all labels on plants grown from Ritter´s seeds are lost, but the plant is definitely available. On the market, it sometimes shows up labeled as Trichocereus bridgesii, or probably also labeled as Trichocereus PC. Please note that there is a wide variety of plants from this site and the range is very big, ranging from spiny to completely spineless plants.

Ben Kamm published some photos of a Herbarium specimen that was very close to Trichocereus bridgesii as well.

Where to buy seeds and plants of Trichocereus riomizquensis?:

Though Trichocereus riomizquensis is common in cactus collection in the USA, it is usually mislabeled. Sacred Succulents were giving away seeds after their Field Trips and some plants might have gotten into the hands of collectors. They are also selling live plants grown from their collected seeds sometimes.

Description of Trichocereus riomizquensis:

This is partial description of Friedrich Ritter´s original description, including remarks on how to keep it apart from T. scopulicola.

Trichocereus riomizquensis is 6-8 centimeters thick (while Trichocereus scopulicola is 8-10 centimeters thick), it has 5-6 ribs, (T. scopulicola: 4-6), its flanks are 2 centimeters wide (Scopulicola 3-4 cm wide flanks), the flanks are less rounded than the ones on Tr. scopulicola. It has rounded areoles (while the ones on T. scopulicola are usually oval). The areoles have a very visible fluff with a diameter of 2-3 mm. The 1-5 spines are honey-colored and between 1-3 mm long. Sometimes they are even missing.
The flower of Trichocereus riomizquensis is 20 centimeters long (while the flowers of T. scopulicola are 16-20) and covered with dark brown/white wool with large scales. The fruit looks knobby.

Type locality: Chuyllas near the Rio Mizque, on very steep rock walls in the province Campero, Bolivia. Discovered from Ritter in 1958 – FR 856.

Trichocereus riomizquensis Ritter

Ritter´s original photo of his Trichocereus riomizquensis. It is possible that this plant is the same strain as the American PC clone, which gets very close to this plant´s phenotype.

Trichocereus PC clone Predominant cultivar

In comparison to Ritter´s plant, check out the PC Trichocereus clone above. (Forest and Kim Starr)

Trichocereus riomizquensis Herbarium, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010 copyright B

Trichocereus riomizquensis Herbarium, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010 232

This is one of the plants from the Sacred Succulents Field Trips:

Trichocereus Riomizquensis BK10508Copyright Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com

 

Trichocereus Riomizquensis BK 10.08.7

Trichocereus Riomizquensis BK 10.08.7

BK10512.1 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora, Cochabamba, Bolivia

Trichocereus riomizquensis is one of the most interesting species from the Sacred Succulents Field Trips because of its incredible range. Some plants look like the Trichocereus bridgesii-type plants with long spines from the Field Trips and some other ones look like the short spine versions that Friedrich Ritter´s description was about.

If you take a close look at the whole appearance of this plant, you can see that it has a similar areole shape to the areoles on the well known Trichocereus PC clone, also known as predominant cultivar or predominate cultivar.  The flower and the overall appearance are so similar that everything else would be extremely surprising. Despite the fact that there are some very spiny plants at this site, there are some other which get extremely close to Ritter´s original photo. Though this will probably never be proven, there´s definitely reasonable doubt that this PC clone is actually a Trichocereus pachanoi.

There is a lot variation within the populations the original site near the Rio Mizque. This population is one of the most interesting Trichocereus populations out there and DNA testing should absolutely be made to look into its relationship to Trichocereus bridgesii.

Where to buy seeds or cuttings of Trichocereus riomizquensis:

Well, Ben and Sacred Succulents would be my starting point if I were in the USA. They don´t ship plants internationally, but if you have the luck to be in the country you might be able to get some cuttings. Apart from this, I do not know any sources for this species. Most of Ritter´s old plants have lost their labels meanwhile, which makes getting one even harden. I am sure that some of them show up on online market places labeled as Trichocereus bridgesii every now and then.

BK10512.1 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora, Cochabamba, Bolivia 1
Copyright: Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com

BK10512.1 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2

BK10512.1 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora, Cochabamba, Bolivia 3

BK10512.1 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora, Cochabamba, Bolivia Echinopsis BK10512.1 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora, Cochabamba, Bolivia Echinopsis 5  BK10512.1 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora, Cochabamba, Bolivia Echinopsis 6

BK10512.4 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora,  Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010

BK10512.4 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora,  Cochabamba, Bolivia Echinopsis Rio Mizque

This photo here looks really unspectacular, but shows the area of the Rio Mizque. It is the place of origin of this rare species and most of the plants that can be found there are obviously Bridgesii related.

BK10512.4 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora,  Cochabamba, Bolivia Echinopsis Rio Mizque 2

BK10512.4 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora,  Cochabamba, Bolivia Echinopsis Rio Mizque 4

Trichocereus vollianus / Echinopsis volliana

Trichocereus vollianus / Echinopsis volliana

Trichocereus vollianus, also known under it´s currently valid name Echinopsis volliana, is a columnar cactus from the genus Trichocereus. It is a very interesting plant and there is only little information to be found about it. Ben Kamm and Sacred Succulents encountered Trichocereus vollianus during their 2010 Sacred Succulents field trip.

The original description of this plant came from Backeberg in his book KAKTUS-ABC. The original type location is in Arque in Cochabamba. The shoots have a maximum diameter of up to 10 centimeters, approximately 13 ribs and a very bright green yellow color. The epidermis of this plant has similarities to Trichocereus spachianus, which has a very bright green color too. The ribs are 7 mm broad and are up to 5 mm high. The areoles are approx. 2-2,5 cm apart from each other. The plant has 7-12 radial spines and very fine and thin spines that can get up to 7 mm long. There usually is only one middle spine which can reach a length of 2,5 cm. All spines are yellow colored (Backeberg used the term “Amber”).

Flowers: The flowers of Trichocereus vollianus are white and up to 12 cm long. However, I assume that the flowers depend greatly on the health of the plant and larger flowers wouldn’t come as a surprise to me.

Fruit: Green and very hairy.

How to keep it apart from Trichocereus spachianus?: Trichocereus vollianus is very similar to Trichocereus spachianus but thicker, even more shiny and has a brighter green epidermis. Backeberg also mentioned that they work very well as a grafting stock.

There also was a Trichocereus vollianus var. rubrispinus with reddish spines, which would probably be regarded as nothing but a regional form under today´s standards. It is a common occurrence that some populations are extremely variable with lots of different forms growing together and it is not enough to warrant a separate description as a new species.

Where to get seeds of Trichocereus vollianus?: Well, it´s definitely a rare species. Sacred Succulents collected some seeds and gave them away under the name mentioned above but apart from that, there are very few sources that provide viable seed.  You could make a posting in our Trichocereus Facebook group because I know of some people who were able to get some seeds back when they were sold by Sacred Succulents. Definitely an interesting plant!

Misidentified Trichocereus vollianus in Australia:

There are a whole lot of misidentified plants of this species going around in Australia. These are probably either Trichocereus thelegonoides or Trichocereus quadratiumbonatum. If your Trichocereus  vollianus has strong ridges/notches above the areoles, it is not the right species.

Fotos below: Trichocereus vollianus (Jürgen Els)

Trichocereus vollianus / Echinopsis volliana Jürgen Els

Photos below:
BK10511.1 Trichocereus vollianus, between Arani & Rodeo, Cochabamba, Bolivia / Sacred Succulents

263 BK10511

264 BK10511

265 BK10511Photos below: A form of Trichocereus vollianus with slight genetic proximity to Trichocereus spachianus (Pedro Lopez Artés)

Trichocereus sp. ‘Isla del Sol’ (Echinopsis)

Trichocereus sp. ‘Isla del Sol’ (Echinopsis)

This population from the Bolivian island ‘Isla Del Sol’ belongs into the distant complex of Trichocereus bridgesii / Echinopsis lageniformis. However, it is currently discussed whether or not this plant is actually a different species and DNA testing is required to look into its status.  Sacred Succulents visited this population during their Field Trips and made some amazing photos. I also have some sick photos of it in my first book.

 

BK08601.1 Trichocereus Isla del Sol, Bolivia

Now, this is one of the most interesting Trichocereus species that were visited during the Sacred Succulents Field Trips! All the photos shown here are from Ben Kamm & Sacredsucculents.com! This was from the 2008 Field Trip and it is very similar to an intermediate between Trichocereus bridgesii and something from the Trichocereus cuzcoensis complex. Trichocereus cuzcoensis is mostly known for the plants in Cusco that were used to write the original description, but there are similar plants and relatives of Trichocereus cuzcoensis that can be found in other Peruvian states.

It also reminds me a little bit of Trichocereus knuthianus, which also belongs to the Cuzcoensis complex and has similar, massive areoles. Those plants are definitely very old…how they evolved exactly is not known.
Sacred Succulents gave away seed of this amazing species in 2008, but I do not know of anyone who raised some of them so far. If you happen to own this type, please let me know because it´s on my most-wanted list and I urgently need more pics of seed grown plants. The Isla Del Sol is an area that can be found in the southern part of the Lake Titicaca in Bolivia. It´s a wonderful area that is filled with ancient ruins and that screams “History”. I do not know if those plants were intentionally planted there or if they just evolved, but it´s definitely one of the coolest Trichocereus species out there.

Isla Del Sol in Bolivia

193 BK08601.1 Trichocereus Isla del Sol, BoliviaCopyright: Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com

192 BK08601

BK08601.2 Trichocereus Isla del Sol, Bolivia

This is another Plant from the same region. Judging by the looks of it, it grows very nearby. The Plant is somehow connected to the Trichocereus cuzcoensis Complex and is simply awesome!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

195 BK08601

Trichocereus huanucoensis (Echinopsis)

Trichocereus huanucoensis (Echinopsis)

Trichocereus huanucoensis goes back to a nursery owner called Harry Johnson senior, who brought this plant into the USA in the 1950s. Unlike popular belief, Trichocereus huanucoensis is NOT an official species. There is no official description and very little information about the plant. According to Herbarium pieces, its place of origin is Huanuco. It is a beautiful town directly beside Chavin de Huantar and the plants that can be found there are Trichocereus santaensis and intermediate forms between Trichocereus santaensis and Trichocereus pachanoi. The same applies to Trichocereus huanucoensis too. It is fairly typical of Backeberg´s species Trichocereus santaensis and the place of origin underlines that. If you want to see similar plants, check out the posting about Chavin de Huantar.

Trichocereus huanucoensis Echinopsis Misplant

Trichocereus huanucoensis has very wide ribs, which give it a similar look to Trichocereus santaensis and Trichocereus bridgesii. The original site where Johnson collected his seeds is unknown, but the plants grown from them are common to be found in some parts of the USA. In California, quite a few larger plants were planted outside. Apart from its occurrence in cactus nurseries and collected in the USA, it is very rare in Europe. This underlines the suspicion that Mr. Johnson was indeed the source and distributed this plant among his friends and customers.

Trichocereus huanucoensis tends to be extremely fat and has a very bloated look. Its spine length is extremely variable and the specimens can have no spines or long spines but it usually has very few spines per areole. The spines are usually golden, but lack a swollen spine base. This is a key similarity to the plants from Chavin de Huantar as well.

Though the obvious lack of a description, it is a very attractive plant that deserves to be propagated. It is commercially available from Sacred Succulents or Misplant but it is still a rare plant.

One specimen of Trichocereus huanucoensis is also growing in the Huntington Botanical Garden in California. The specimen that Sacred Succulents use for their Huanucoensis crosses was originally from Ed Gay, who was a close friend of Johnson & Huntington. Some people tend to believe that Trichocereus huanucoensis is a Bridgesii relative, but the flower morphology pretty much rules that out right away. Its flowers and flower buds are typical for a Peruvian San Pedro, especially T. santaensis.

There is a variety of this plant on the market labeled H80361, which probably originated from Johnson also. There might have been the chance to find out more about the origin of the plant in the Huntington Botanical Garden but unfortunately, they do not have any info on where some of their older plants came from. At some point, their ID cards were stolen or lost, what makes it more difficult to find more information on the plant´s origin other than that it came from Huanuco.

Trichocereus huanucoensis Echinopsis Misplant 9

Trichocereus huanucoensis Echinopsis Misplant 8

Trichocereus huanucoensis Echinopsis Misplant 9 7

Trichocereus huanucoensis Echinopsis Misplant 6

Trichocereus huanucoensis Echinopsis Misplant 4

Trichocereus huanucoensis Echinopsis Misplant 3

Trichocereus huanucoensis Echinopsis Misplant 2

Trichocereus huanucoensis Echinopsis Misplant 11

Trichocereus huanucoensis Echinopsis Misplant 12

Copyright: Misplant.net

Trichocereus huanucoensis cutting

 

Trichocereus Aff. Huanucoensis – Trout

Trichocereus huanucoensis

Trichocereus huanucoensis 4

Trichocereus huanucoensis buy

Trichocereus aff. huanucoensis

Huanocoensis var. Stillman

Trichocereus huanucoensis seeds

Trichocereus huanucoensis x Serra Blue Echinopsis Delia Kisar

Trichocereus huanucoensis x Serra Blue Echinopsis Delia Kisar

Trichocereus huanucoensis x Serra Blue Echinopsis Delia Kisar

Trichocereus huanucoensis x Serra Blue Echinopsis Delia Kisar

 

SS03 (Trichocereus knuthianus)

SS03 (Trichocereus knuthianus)

The SS03 Trichocereus is a clone that was and still is distributed by Sacred Succulents in California. It is a Trichocereus knuthianus that is very similar to the other Knuthianus forms that are available sometimes. The plant has strong spines and very typical V-notches that make it easy to spot. Seed grown seedlings grown from SS03 seeds look very spiny and have thin & yellow spines.

This is Sacred Succulents description from their catalogue. You can get this plant through their website at sacredsucculents.com:

Upright columns to 16′ or more. Dark green stems up to 6″ in diameter. Areoles bear 7 – 9 radial spines up to 1″ and one stout central spine up to 2″ long. White nocturnal flowers. Appears to be a form of Trichocereus peruvianus. Cold hardy to at least 25° Fahrenheit.

 

Sacred Succulents SS03 NR
Photos: Noah Reams

SS03 NR

Chavín de Huántar: Trichocereus santaensis & El Lanzon

Chavín de Huántar: Trichocereus santaensis & El Lanzon

Chavín de Huántar is an archaeological site in Peru with a long history of Trichocereus cultivation. There are plants that can be found within the ruins and those plants probably go back for many thousands of years. The ruins are thought to be from 1200BC and the age of this complex is energetically discussed among archaeologists.

This legendary place is located in the Ancash area and holds great religious as well as historic significance, which is why the center was in the midst of the Chavin culture. It is located near the important Peruvian city Lima and lies at the confluence of two large rivers: The Rio Mosnar and the Huanchecsa river. The Trichocereus strains from this area have a huge botanic variability and the area is home to a large number of different plants and Trichocereus species.

Chavín_de_Huántar Sharon odbPhoto: Sharon ODB

Peru Map Trichocereus Chavin Santa Valley santaensisMap: Urutseg

Photos from the Sacred Succulents Field Trips. Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com. 

Trichocereus sp, Chavindehuantar, Ancash, Peru 

The regional form known from this area is probably somewhere between Trichocereus cuzcoensis and Trichocereus peruvianus. We saw plants that clearly belonged into the Trichocereus santaensis group as well as other weird plants…some of which even look like Trichocereus huanucoensis.

 

Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 

Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru  2

Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 3 Echinopsis santaensis

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru

Another great Specimen from the Ancash Region in Peru.

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 1

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2

BK09509.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 3

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 1

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 2

BK09508.2 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru Tillandsia Echinopsis santaensis

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 3

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 1

BK09509.1 Trichocereus sp, Chavin, Ancash, Peru 2009 2

El Lanzon Trichocereus :

This legendary photo is made by Aplantis.net:

Trichocereus El Lanzon Echinopsis santaensis Trichocereus santaensis peruvianus

Photo: Aplantis.net

This plant has a great history and most people who visit the area can´t go by without taking loads of photos. It´s one of my most favorite plants.

Trichocereus chavin de huantar Peru El Lanzon

Those plants were posted by ChavinHerbalist. They are trying to preserve the genetics and posted some amazing photos on Facebook. Check them out!

AD002 Chavin Herbalist Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis

Trichocereus Chavin Seedling cactus Trichocereus santaensis

Photos below Trichocereus santaensis / Echinopsis santaensis in Chavin de Huantar, El Lanzon (Riley Flatten)

Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley FlattenPhoto Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 2Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 3Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis Riley Flatten 4Photo Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenPhoto Trichocereus Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 2Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenPhotos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 22Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 3Photos Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 4El Lanzon Photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenCactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenCactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley FlattenCactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 3Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 2Cactus photo Trichocereus santaensis Chavin de Huantar El Lanzon Trichocereus santaensis Echinopsis santaensis Riley Flatten 5Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de HuantarTrichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 2Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 3Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 4Trichocereus santaensis El Lanzon San Marcos Chavin de Huantar 5

 

Trichocereus bridgesii / Echinopsis lageniformis in Bolivia

 Echinopsis lageniformis / Trichocereus bridgesii in Bolivia

Echinopsis lageniformis or Trichocereus bridgesii is probably THE dominant Trichocereus species in Bolivia. Yes, there are others but this species pretty much reflects the Bolivian counterpart to its Peruvian sister species like Trichocereus pachanoi and Trichocereus peruvianus. The populations usually get up to 4-5 meters tall and form large groups. This plant is probably one of the most drought resistant Trichocereus species, which it manages to survive even the extreme temperatures in the Bolivian desert.

Read the full database entry on Trichoereus bridgesii / Echinopsis lageniformis here: https://trichocereus.net/trichocereus-bridgesii-echinopsis-lageniformis

The Californian Nursery Sacredsucculents.com visited some regional populations of Trichocereus bridgesii / Echinopsis lageniformis in their Field Trips and I am extremely glad to have them here on the website. All photos are from Ben Kamm.

BK08603.3 Trichocereus bridgesii & BK08603.2 Prosopis alba, Huachjilla

This plant is very similar to the ones labeled Trichocereus aff. pachanoi. You can definitely see why so many people say that Trichocereus pachanoi grows in Bolivia too. They are extremely similar and it takes a lot of time and effort to differentiate them. The plant grows beside Prosopis Alba!

Trichocereus bridgesii / Echinopsis lageniformis in Bolivia 1

BK08608.2 Trichocereus bridgesii, mutant Achuma, NE La Paz, Bolivia

Another plant from the Sacred Succulents Field Trip 2008. A mutated version of an Achuma cactus that is just mindblowing. This is the type of thing that you can only encounter in nature. Those amazing walls of cactus are probably some of the most impressive sights that you can come across.

Below: This Trichocereus shows symptoms of Witches Broom disease. There are various reasons for this, some of which are mutations, infections with phytoplasms, etc.Trichocereus bridgesii / Echinopsis lageniformis in Bolivia 2

Trichocereus bridgesii / Echinopsis lageniformis in Bolivia 4

Trichocereus bridgesii / Echinopsis lageniformis in Bolivia 5

BK08608.3 Trichocereus bridgesii,NE La Paz, Bolivia

 

It comes from the same site as the BK08608.2 Trichocereus bridgesii / Echinopsis lageniformis, but from a different Plant! The BK08 means that it was visited by Ben Kamm in 2008. The later numbers are either labeled BK09 or BK10. There also were some plants that were visited during the 2014 Field Trip, which were labeled BK14. Those plants are dark green and very similar to what is understood as San Pedro. The flowers are covered with white hairs, which is a great way to keep it apart from most of the Peruvian San Pedros.

BK08608.3 Trichocereus bridgesii,NE La Paz, Bolivia

BK08608.3 Trichocereus bridgesii Echinopsis lageniformis,NE La Paz, Bolivia

Echinopsis pachanoi in Bolivia?

Echinopsis pachanoi in Bolivia?

There are many people or books referring to populations of the Echinopsis pachanoi in Bolivia. But much unlike popular belief, most of those plants are actually spineless varieties of Trichocereus bridgesii. Though both species can be very similar under certain conditions, you definitely see the difference on flowering plants. Echinopsis pachanoi usually has brown or black hairs on the flowers, while the hairs on the Bolivian species are often white.

Here are some of the Bolivian Echinopsis pachanoi populations that were visited during Sacred Succulents´Field Trips. Most of the plants are labeled Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, what stands for „affinity to Trichocereus pachanoi“. That means that those plants look similar to Trichocereus pachanoi, while they probably are more closely related to Trichocereus bridgesii. Don´t forget that Trichocereus pachanoi is widely cultivated in every South American country today. It´s just that the Bolivian version of Echinopsis pachanoi is Trichocereus bridgesii, which is also called Achuma or Cactus of the Four Winds. The latter has become a catchy marketing phrase for everything that has four ribs, but that has more to do with marketing than ancient history. Nonetheless, this phrase has been used for a four-ribbed Bridgesii type. With that said, many plants can temporarily have four ribs, but usually grow some later on.

Here I will show some photos from the Sacred Succulents Field Trips from Bolivia. All those pics are from  Ben Kamm and Sacredsucculents.com. Please support them to make more Field Trips like those possible!

 BK10512.11 Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, near Cuchucunata,  Cochabamba, Bolivia 

 BK10512.11 Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, near Cuchucunata,  Cochabamba, Bolivia 

 BK10512.11 Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, near Cuchucunata,  Cochabamba, Bolivia Those plants are relatively spineless, but look pretty typical for Bolivian plants between Trichocereus pachanoi and Trichocereus bridgesii. In my eyes, those are just spineless or relatively spineless forms of Trichocereus bridgesii but you would need to take a look at the flowers to verify. There certainly are some cultivated Pachanois in Bolivia, but they are grown as natural fencing or garden plants are did not evolve over time. Most populations of Echinopsis pachanoi in Bolivia are actually Trichocereus bridgesii.

Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, Arani, Cochabamba, Bolivia 

On this one, you can see the obvious relationship to Trichocereus bridgesii. I originally wrote that it might be related to Trichocereus scopulicola, but it could as well but just another type of Trichocereus bridgesii. But the labeling with aff. pachanoi fits pretty good, though those are all closer related to Trichocereus bridgesii than they are to Trichocereus pachanoi.

Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, Arani, Cochabamba, Bolivia 

Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, Arani, Cochabamba, Bolivia  2

BK10508.5 T. aff. pachanoi, Tiatako, Cochabamba, Bolivia 

Another version of Echinopsis pachanoi in Bolivia, but which is actually closer to Echinopsis lageniformis, aka Trichocereus bridgesii. This one is the most interesting, because it might actually be a relative of Trichocereus scopulicola. But I would need to take a closer look at the rest of the plants. On the second pic, the ribs look very much like the ribs on a Trichocereus scopulicola.

BK10508.5 T. aff. pachanoi, Tiatako, Cochabamba, Bolivia 

BK10508.5 T. aff. pachanoi, Tiatako, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2

BK10508.1 Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, Cerro San Pedro, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010

BK10508.1 Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, Cerro San Pedro, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010

BK10508.1 Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, Cerro San Pedro, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010 2

BK10508.1 Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, Cerro San Pedro, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010 4

BK10508.1 Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, Cerro San Pedro, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010 6

Trichocereus bridgesii, Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010

Trichocereus bridgesii, Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010

Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010

Very cool Trichocereus growing in Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden in Cochabamba, Bolivia!

Trichocereus aff. pachanoi, Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010

Trichocereus species in Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden Cochabamba, Bolivia

Martin Cardenas is a specialist on peruvian cacti and this is his botanical garden in Chochabamba. He is widely accepted and respected field botanist and it´s really great to see his private garden.

Trichocereus species in Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden Cochabamba, Bolivia

Trichocereus species in Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden Cochabamba, Bolivia 2

Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana

Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana

Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana is one of the most sought after types. Matucana is the type locality of Trichocereus peruvianus, which means that in Matucana you can find the most typical plants according to the description. The description was originally made by the Americans Britton & Rose, and the described a plant that must have been somewhere between Trichocereus peruvianus and Trichocereus cuzcoensis. And yes, Trichocereus cuzcoensis plays a part in the history of Trichocereus peruvianus as well. Both are so closely related and exist with many intermediate forms in between that Britton & Rose´s decision to keep them separated from each other was not regarded without criticism.

One of the most typical Matucana Peruvianus types is the ICARO DNA Peruvianus. Icaro Dna made a name for themselves providing great quality seeds that are probably as true as it gets to the original description. To me, when I hear the name MATUCANA, I think of this remarkable type.
ICARO DNA Rod 2Photo: Trichocereus.com.au

Some more Matucana Peruvianus types are the LOS GENTILES Peruvanus from Sacred Succulents and my own Matucana Peruvianus in my shop! Sorry for the promo, but it´s super high quality seeds that you will love!
But now back to the Matucana Perus. Sacred Succulents had the great luck to visit some of them during their South America Field Trips. Here are some of them:

291 BK08612

Trichocereus peruvianus, Matucana, Peru

Trichocereus Peruvianus without a field number. Again in Matucana Peru. Very cool Glauceous Tricho, similar to the cultivar Trichocereus Rosei or Trichocereus Glaucus. Pic: Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com! Please support them because they are awesome!

296 Trichocereus peruvianus, Matucana, Peru

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BK08612.4-A Trichocereus peruvianus, Matucana, Peru

Another frosted Peruvianus from the Location in Matucana. Very similar to the Plants that are labeled “Trichocereus Rosei”. Or Trichocerus Glaucus! Pic: Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com!

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Another type that is believed to be a Matucana type is the Australian Trichocereus rosei clone. It´s fabulous and one of my absolute favorites. Rosei 2 is DEFINITELY a Matucana…and Rosei 1 most likely. The alternative would be that it comes from Rimac, but I want to show it here too!

T.peru Roseii1 Flower_1

This is Rosei 2, just for comparisons:

T.peru Roseii2_1

Some of those plants are sometimes called Trichocereus santaensis, but those are usually thinner and overall closer to Trichocereus pachanoi or sometimes even Trichocereus bridgesii than they are to Trichocereus peruvianus.

Well, that was one of the more typical Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana. This city in Peru is one of the historic cactus sites, especially for the species Trichocereus peruvianus. Matucana is the type locality of Trichocereus peruvianus, which means that in Matucana you can find the most typical plants. But there is more; many many plants with cuzcoensis genetics. For example, KK242 is from Matucana too! And due to the high number of intermediates between Trichocereus cuzcoensis and Trichocereus peruvianus, it´s sometimes not easy to draw a firm line between them.

T_peruvianus_KK242_JLH_via_SS_Trout
This photo shows a fairly typical KK242 from Matucana. The photo comes from K.Trout and his website troutsnotes.com.

And now compare this to this other plant from Matucana:

Trichocereus KK242 Matucana K39_3_jpg

It´s funny…but that one was sold as KK242 from Matucana too. Just to give you an understanding of what is actually out there.

BK10508.7 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora , Cochabamba, Bolivia

BK10508.7 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora , Cochabamba, Bolivia 

Trichocereus riomizquensis BK10508.7 is a very cool Plant! that is obviously related to Trichocereus bridgesii.

Trichocereus riomizquensis is probably partially synonymous with Trichocereus bridgesii or belongs to Trichocereus bridgesii in a wider sense. The latter is not very surprising because both are from Bolivia and grow very close to each other.

Ritter gave CHYLLAS near the Rio Mizque in the province Campero as the type locality of Trichocereus riomizquensus, growing on rocky slopes.

Ritter assigned the FR/Winter seed code (after the name of his sister, who ran his seed business) FR856. After all these years, there are only very few plants of Ritter´s FR856 left which still have their original label intact and if thereanybody out there who grows a plant labeled Trichocereus riomizquensis FR856, please let me know and I will add them to the database! There were also seeds given away in the Sacred Succulents Field Trips and I´d love to see photos of the offspring as well.

BK10508.7 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora , Cochabamba, Bolivia

BK10508.7 Trichocereus riomizquensis, Totora , Cochabamba, Bolivia 2

Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010 – Sacredsucculents.com

If you are interested in Trichocereus riomizquensis, it can´t get any better than seeing the species in field expert Martin Cardenas´garden in Chochabamba. This plant is very unique, but also shows a close connection to Trichocereus bridgesii. I am sure if I was to take a look at the flowers now, I would see a flower that is extremely close to the flower of Trichocereus bridgesii. Buds, flowers and fruit bear white hairs, which can also be see on the notorious PC clone in the United States (which we suspect might be grown from Ritter´s Trichocereus riomizquensis seeds).

Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2010 - Sacredsucculents.com

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