Tag: Trichocereus peruvianus

Trichocereus tarmaensis / Echinopsis tarmaensis

Trichocereus tarmaensis / Echinopsis tarmaensis

Trichocereus tarmaensis Rauh & Backeberg – Deser. Cact. Nov. 20. 1956

Trichocereus tarmaensis is a close relative of Trichocereus cuzcoensis that was described as a separate species. There are various differences between Trichocereus cuzcoensis and Trichocereus tarmaensis, and some forms of Trichocereus knuthianus are considered to be synonymous with Trichocereus tarmaensis as well.

Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis

Trichocereus tarmaensis reaches a size of 2 meters and is pupping from the base. It has 7-9 ribs that are approximately 2 centimeters wide, rounded at the top and with very distinct V-notches above the areoles. The areoles are approx. 2-2,5 centimeters apart with a diameter of 9 millimeters. Young growth areoles have a very fine brown wool that changes it´s color to a darker brown. It has 3-6 radial spines that are between 1 and 3 cm long. It often has one very large downward pointing spine that is up to 10 centimeters long. The plant usually has one of those middle spines. Old spine growth changes its color very soon to a gray, similar to what we know from Trichocereus cuzcoensis.

Flower of E.tarmaensis:

White, very similar or identical to some of the spiny forms of Trichocereus cuzcoensis or  Trichocereus peruvianus. The tube has brown hairs and the fruit reaches a maximum diameter of 5 centimeters.

Type location:

Central peru, Tarma in Peru at around 3000 meters.

Trichocereus tarmaensis looks very similar to Trichocereus tulhyacensis and both species are hard to distinguish if do not have the luck to observe them during the flowering phase . The flower of Trichocereus tulhuyacensis is pink, which is something that does not apply to any other Trichocereus species from this complex. If your Trichocereus has a reddish to pink flower, it´s not Trichocereus tarmaensis but Trichocereus tulhuyacensis or another close relative. Both Trichocereus tarmaensis and Trichocereus tulhuayacensis are very rare and mislabeled anyways. Karel Knize is selling seed of this type under the name KK2148 Trichocereus tarmaensis .

Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis  2

Backeberg´s photo Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis

This picture shows a seedgrown specimen that was sold through the SAB shop in Australia.

SAB Trichocereus Tarmaensis KK2148 Echinopsis tarmaensis knize

When looking at this pic, it gets obvious that this type is VERY similar to some types of Trichocereus cuzcoensis, and even has similarities to a KK242. I do not think that specimens of KK2148  could be recognized as such without knowing the label. They are simply synonymous with some types of Trichocereus cuzcoensis. This species grows at around 3000 meters altitude.

Trichocereus tarmaensis Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma  Photo: S. Preiss

Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis  Trichocereus.net

Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis  Trichocereus.net 2

Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Trichocereus tarmaensis  Trichocereus.net 3

Below: Some photos from Tarma. The first one does not show a Trichocereus, but the others show some of the wild forms in between Trichocereus tarmaensis and Trichocereus knuthianus.

Columnar Cactus Cacti Tarma

Trichocereus tarmaensis Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Knuthianus

Trichocereus tarmaensis Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Knuthianus 2

Trichocereus tarmaensis Echinopsis tarmaensis Tarma Knuthianus 5

 

 

 

 

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana

Trichocereus peruvianus or Echinopsis peruviana is a columnar cactus that can get up to 4 meters long and reaches 20 centimeters in diameter. It´s also called the PERUVIAN TORCH cactus and is native in Peru. Britton and Rose – The Cact. II, S.136 /192

Red Spine Trichocereus peruvianus / Trichocereus macrogonus

Trichocereus peruvianus / macrogonus from Matucana Red Spines

Trichocereus peruvianus Trichocereus macrogonus Pomolargo
Trichocereus peruvianus Trichocereus macrogonus Pomolargo

Trichocereus peruvianus Collana Pichu Peru Echinopsis macrogona

Description of Trichocereus peruvianus:

Most regional forms belonging to this species have a frosted blue color and grow between 6-9 ribs. Its flowers are white, though there are some close relatives that have a different flower color (Trichocereus tulhuayacensis). It usually grows upright, but sometimes grows prostrate hanging down from cliffs and rocks.
The size and color of the spines varies greatly, but most of them have about 6-8 honey-colored to brown spines that can reach about 4 centimeters in length. The areoles are brown to beige-felted and up to 2,5 centimeters distanced from each other. The Spines do NOT have a knobbed Base. The spine color is one of the key traits if you attempt to tell it apart from Trichocereus macrogonus. We write more on Trichocereus macrogonus in that particular chapter.

Trichocereus macrogona / Echinopsis macrogona aka T. peruvianus

Trichocereus peruvianus Matucana Echinopsis peruviana
A Peru at the type locality in Matucana.

Echinopsis peruviana flowers very easily as soon as it reaches a certain size and the plant is very easy to cultivate. Some of them have a distinct V-Notch above the areoles, but not all and it´s not a trait that is reliable for identification.

Cultivation of Trichocereus peruvianus / Echinopsis peruviana:

Trichocereus peruvianus can be grown from seed 0r propagated by cuttings. Seeds need to be sprinkled on top of the soil because they require sunlight to germinate. The seeds are tiny and only a few mm large and have a long viability. Usually, the seeds can stay viable for up to 10 years or above, though that depends on many factors. The Seed needs to be stored in a dry and cold environment to guarantee maximum viability.

Trichocereus peruvianus Los Gentiles Echinopsis peruviana
Los Gentiles (Noah Reams)

The cactus can also be propagated through cuttings and it´s very easy to root. But make sure that the cuttings are not smaller than 20 centimeters because that stunts the growth tremendously.

The flower of Trichocereus peruvianus / Echinopsis peruviana:

The flower is white and reaches as size of up to 25 centimeters. Trichocereus peruvianus is a night flowering species.

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Rosei flower photo Prier

Type locality of Trichocereus peruvianus / Echinopsis peruviana:

Peru (around Matucana). Trichocereus peruvianus is the dominant Trichocereus species in Matucana.

Plants that are closely related or are synonymous with Trichocereus peruvianus:

Trichocereus tacnaensis, Trichocereus puquiensis, Trichocereus santaensis (some of the plants around the Santa Valley belong to Tr. pachanoi though), Trichocereus tarmaensis (closely related to Trichocereus cuzcoensis as well), Trichocereus macrogonus, Echinopsis macrogona, Trichocereus f. Ancash, Trichocereus sp. Ayacucho, Trichocereus giganteus, Trichocereus longispinus, Trichocereus sp. Pamacoche, Trichocereus sp. Matucana, Trichocereus rosei,

Trichocereus peruvianus and Trichocereus pachanoi are sister species and closely related. Some field botanist considered them one large and variable species and there are countless intermediates and hybrids that could be placed in either species. Around 1950-1980, some authors came up with a large number of unnecessary species names and most of these plants would fit into the description of Trichocereus peruvianus as well.

Some commercial names that we sometimes see in combination with Trichocereus peruvianus.

Please note that these are not officially accepted varieties and we only list them in this form because they were listed by wholesale:

Trichocereus peruvianus var. (H14192), Huntington, EE.UU.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. huancabamba, Piura, northwest Peru.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. huancavelica (KK242a), west central Peru.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. cuzcoensis (KK340), Huachac, Cuzco, southeastern Peru.

Trichocereus peruvianus var. huancayo (KK338), west central Peru.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. ancash (KK1688), San Marcos, Ancash, northwest Peru.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. matucana (KK242) Lima, central west Peru.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. puquiensis (KK1689), Puquio, Apurimac Region, southwestern peru.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. trujilloensis, Trujillo, La Libertad, northwestern Peru.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. tarmensis (KK2148), Tarma, Junin, west central Peru.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. Rio Lurin (KK2147), Rio Rimac, Lima, west central Peru.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. ayacuchensis (KK2151), southwestern Peru.
Trichocereus peruvianus var. huaraz (KK2152), Ancash, northwestern Peru.

Culture of T. peruvianus:

The culture of Trichocereus peruvianus is not very hard. The plant has very similar requirements as other Trichocereus species like Trichocereus macrogonus or Trichocereus pachanoi. Trichocereus peruvianus is an extremely frost resistant plant that can thrive in the most difficult environment. Some of its forms grow columnar while some others are creeping/prostrate. In their natural habitats, they even hang down on hills or rocky slopes. When watering cacti, the soil should not stay wet for more than a couple of hours because it greatly increases the probability of rot. Cacti need a substrate that dries out fast and too much water is often deadly for them. Apart from a little bit of water here and there, you should only water Trichocereus peruvianus when it´s warm. During the hot growth-season, they can take daily or weekly watering and like to be fertilized on a 7-14-days schedule. I even fertilize weekly during the main season, but that also depends on your personal way of growing cacti. It’s best to use a mineral substrate like Pumice or Lava, with additives like Coir, Sand, Sowing Soil, Expanded Clay etc. Just make sure to add in a very small part of Coir or Humus because it helps to solidify the soil and increases the cactus ability to take in nutrients. I personally love Lava and Pumice and the plants enjoy it very much! Echinopsis peruviana aka Trichocereus peruvianus likes a sunny place in half-shade, but not full sun. They can take it if they are used to it, but it increases the risk of sunburn. Especially directly after the winter period when they are not used to it yet.

Winter & Frost Protection: Trichocereus peruvianus is a relatively frost hardy cactus. It’s usually not a problem for it to take take a little night frost here and there and is tolerant down to -9° Celsius. But that’s really the limit and I would not be comfortable to push it below that. There are always plants are less frost tolerant than others and you never know where the limit for your plant is going to be. A plant that spent its life in a heated greenhouse, will die very soon if you suddenly start exposing it to cold winter frost. The cacti need to be hardened up and in a good general health. In my greenhouse I overwinter Trichocereus at 1° Celsius between December and March.

Minimum average winter temperature:

The ideal average winter temperature for Trichocereus peruvianus is 10° Celsius. That´s close to their natural winter period in habitat. Trichocereus peruvianus can compensate short frosts down to 15.8° Fahrenheit every now and then but you should take care that it has an average temperature of around 50° Fahrenheit.

Winter storage & Winter Protection for Trichocereus:

Trichocereus peruvianus needs fresh air during the wintertime if you want to overwinter the plant inside. It also needs light and the soil has to be completely dry, to make sure that the rootstock does not rot. This is important because that’s exactly what happens in the habitat during the winter time. Trichocereus peruvianus can deal with low temperatures as long as its dry.  Of course all those overwintering-rules only apply of you live in a country with hard winter frost down to -20° celsius and lower. If you live in a warmer country such as Australia, this certainly is not a problem for you and water or high air humidity are the bigger problem then. I also know many growers from the CA area in the USA, and they usually get their plants over the winter without problems, if they do nor get surprisingly cold frosts. Leave your Trichocereus peruvianus in a bright room, give it a little bit fresh air every now and then and make sure to keep the temperatures below 10° Celsius. As soon as you put them in a heated room, they will require regular waterings and light or they will die quickly. In addition they will etiolate. If kept dry, the water requirements during the winter are minimal though. The minimum temp in Fahrenheit is 50° Fahrenheit. No water should be given between late autumn (October-early May) unless you grow them in a heated place, eg greenhouse or house.
If you are lucky enough to have a greenhouse, you can take out most Trichocereus in early March, but you should also check the maximum frost tolerance of the species you take out. There are many cacti that need higher temperatures to stay healthy.

Germinating Trichocereus peruvianus seeds:

Just like Seed of other Trichocereus species, Trichocereus peruvianus seeds need light to germinate. I usually prepare a mix of Pumice, Lava, Coir, and Sand and and sprinkle the seeds on top of the soil. Make sure not to knock off the sowing container/pot because that would probably bury the seeds and that’s never a good thing. Buried seeds often do not germinate due to the lacking light or they germinate deep inside the soil and die. So yeah, sprinkle them on top of the soil and make sure that the temperatures are between 26° and 30° Celsius. Make sure to add in enough water to start the germination process. However, it does not take a lot of water to kick start the germination and it’s always better to give very little water early on because you can always add in some more. But if you add too much water in the beginning, it cannot be undone without risking to wash or soak away the seed with the excess water. With a syringe, excess water can be removed from the sowing container.  Put the sowing containers in a bright and warm place and be patient. A window sill works perfectly. You can also use a LED lamp to give them enough light to germinate and I can recommend that very much because it increases the germination rate. Adding a decent LED Lamp (like 100 Watt and above) will increase germination rates dramatically and the plants are healthier and grow faster.

Germination of seeds and why some seeds don´t germinate

The problem with seeds is that some shops resell seed from South America wholesalers that sell over-aged seed. So the shops might not know about the bad germination rates that their seeds have and that´s a real problem with Trichocereus peruvianus seed on the market. If you did everything I just mentioned and your seed does not germinate within like 2-6 weeks, it´s most likely old garbage. It does not help to keep it wet for longer than that because that’s not how germination of cactus seeds works. Instead, you let it dry and start another cycle once the soil is completely dry.  It does not help to keep dead seed in germination chambers for 6+ weeks. You will just grow Algae and Moss. Another problem that you can get with commercial seed is that there´s a lot of misidentified seeds of this species available on the market. The people who collect these seeds usually don´t have access to literature and that´s why the misidentification rate is extremely high. . Many Trichocereus cuzcoensis are sold as Trichocereus peruvianus and that´s a big problem for the seed market.

My best recommendation is that if you can get in touch with the seed producer, send them a message and ask about a pic of the mother plant. That way, you can minimize the risk of getting mislabeled seed.

Seed Viability of Echinopsis peruviana/ Trichocereus peruvianus:

The seed of Trichocereus peruvianus is viable for many, many years. I sometimes successfully germinate seeds that are more than 5-10 years old but it always depends on the storage and the seed. Some are dead within a couple of months while some can even stay viable for decades, like Ariocarpus seeds. The bigger the seed, the longer they are viable btw. Rebutia are dead within a couple of weeks, Trichocereus & Echinopsis 5-10 years, Ariocarpus 10+ years, Echinocereus (5-10 years), Lophophora (2-5 years at max).

How to differentiate Trichocereus peruvianus and Trichocereus cuzcoensis? 

The swollen spine bases of Trichocereus cuzcoensis are the main trait that Britton and Rose used to tell them apart. Trichocereus peruvianus does NOT have swollen spine bases. There are many intermediates and forms in between the two, but in regards to the original description that’s the most important trait. In addition, Trichocereus cuzcoensis only grows in Cuzco. There are relatives of Trichocereus cuzcoensis that can be found in other parts of Peru however, e.g. Trichocereus knuthianus, Trichocereus schoenii, etc

How to differentiate Trichocereus peruvianus and macrogonus

Both species are probably synonymous. Trichocereus macrogonus was used for plants with dark brown or red spines, while plants with different spine color were seen as Trichocereus peruvianus. The original description of Trichocereus macrogonus is ancient, lacked important traits or information such as country of origin and the original plant was never found again afterwards. Technically, Trichocereus macrogonus is the older name and might replace Trichocereus peruvianus as official name one day (IF the problematic description will be accepted). Some authors have already started to use this system, but is unclear if it will be accepted officially. Modern taxonomy moves towards fewer species, with a larger number of subspecies or varieties and I completely support that.

Photos Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana

Short Spine Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis macrogona PhotoShort Spine Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis macrogona Photo 2

A short spine version of Echinopsis peruviana / macrogona

Short Spine Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis macrogona Photo 4Short Spine peruvianus Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona PhotoShort Spine Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis macrogona Photo 6Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus by Kakteen Haage

This type of plant is usually treated as Trichocereus macrogonus / Echinopsis macrogonaa

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus by Kakteen Haage 3
Another one that is treated as Trichocereus macrogonus / Echinopsis macrogona.

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Knize

Another one that is treated as Trichocereus macrogonus / Echinopsis macrogona.

Short Spine Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis PhotoShort Spine Macro Photo Trichocereus

 

Trichocereus peruvianus flower photo Trichocereus budsby Randy

T.peru Roseii1 Flower_2

Trichocereus peruvianus photo Woolunda Flower_1

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Woolunda Flower_2

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Rosei2 flower

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana peru Rosei 1_1

This is one of Misplant´s mother plants. You can get some seed here!

trichocereus Peruvianus misplant Echinopsis peruviana photo Peru-3

Another one of Misplant´s mother plants. You can get it´s seed here!

trichocereus Peruvianus misplant Echinopsis peruviana photo Peru-4

 

 

trichocereus Peruvianus misplant Echinopsis peruviana photo Peru-5

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Sharxx Blue Matucana

Photos below: Simon Maddern

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Australian Garden Photos

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Australian Garden Photos 2

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus Australian Garden Photos

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus Australian Garden Photos 4

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus Australian Garden Photos 5

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus Australian Garden Photos 6

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus Australian Garden Photos 7

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus Australian Garden Photos 8

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus Australian Garden Photos 9

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Macrogonus Macro Jo flowers

Photo: Joachim Podschadel

Trichocereus peruvianus from Lurin Valle / Lurin Valley 

Trichocereus peruvianus from Lurin Valle / Lurin Valley 

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana from Lurin Valle / Lurin Valley 

Trichocereus peruvianus Echinopsis peruviana Ayacucho

Trichocereus peruvianus from Ayacucho

Trichocereus peruvianus intermediate Trichocereus peruvianus intermediate Echinopsis peruviana

Trichocereus peruvianus intermediate

Trichocereus peruvianus Apurimac KK1689

Trichocereus peruvianus Apurimac KK1689

Trichocereus peruvianus 'Rosei 1' (Rodni Kisar)

Trichocereus peruvianus ‘Rosei 1’ (Rodni Kisar)

This is Backebergs Description:

Trichocereus peruvianus Br. &
R. — The Cact., II : 136. 1920
Cereus rosei Werd., in Backeberg,
„Neue Kakteen“, 101.
1931.
Entweder ± aufrecht oder überliegend
bis hängend, 2—4 m lang;
Tr. bis 20 cm ∅, anfangs bereift;
Rippen über den Areolen etwas eingesenkt
und ± höckerig erscheinend,
breit-rund; Areolen bis 2,5 cm entfernt,
ziemlich groß, braunfilzig; St.
zuerst braun, ca. 10, einige bis 4 cm
lang, stark und steif, Basis nicht
verdickt; Bl. weiß, groß, zum Teil
zahlreich nach dem Scheitel zu entwickelt.
— P e r u (bei Matucana;
nach Rauh bis oberhalb von Matucana
bzw. bei Tamboraque an der
Lima—Oroya-Bahn bis auf 2800 m)
(Abb. 1059—1060, Tafel 76).
Britton u. Rose bilden mit ihrer
Fig. 197 einen baumartig aufrechten
Cereus ab, Rauh dagegen einen
hängenden; ich selbst fand die Art
anfangs ± aufrecht, dann überliegend
bis niederliegend. Es kommen bei
Matucana aber auch Exemplare des
aufrechten T. santaensis vor, den
Britton u. Rose wohl nicht als besondere
Art erkannten.
Die Identifizierung dieser Art mit
Tr. macrogonus (Kkde., 20. 1941)
kann ich nicht aufrechterhalten.

And Friedrich Ritters:

T R I C H O C E R E U S (BERGER) RICCOBONO 1909
TRICHOCEREUS PACHANOI BR. & R. 1920 The Cactaceae, Bd. 2, S. 134
und
TRICHOCEREUS PACHANOI FORMA PERUVIANUS RITT. comb. nov.
syn. TRICHOCEREUS PERUVIANUS BR. & R. 1920 The Cactaceae, Bd. 2, S. 136
Für TRICHOCER. PACHANOI geben BR. & R. als Typusort an CUENCA, Ecuador,
für TRICHOCER. PERUVIANUS MATUCANA, Peru. In Wahrheit liegt nur
eine Art vor. ROSE war jedenfalls ungenügend orientiert Über die große
Variationsbreite dieser Art in Bestachlung und Areolengröße. Man kann
TRICHOCER. PERUVIANUS nur als eine Form der PACHANOI ansehen, die entweder
allein oder mit letzterer an gleichen Stellen wächst von Ecuador
bis Mittelperu, und zwar mit Übergangsformen in einander. Für die Form
PACHANOI sind typisch Ar. von 3-5 mm Dm., feine Rst. von wenigen mm
Länge und meist nur 1 Mst. von wenigen mm bis zu etwa 2 cm Länge. Oft
fehlen die St. völlig, oder sie sind nur an jüngeren Pflanzen vorhanden
und fehlen an älteren Köpfen. Formen, welche Ar. von etwa 5 bis
nahezu 10 mm Dm. haben und stärkere St., von denen der mittlere meist
über 2 cm Länge hat und selten bis über 10 cm Länge erreichen kann,
wird man als FORMA PERUVIANUS bezeichnen. Die Zahl der St. kann bei
beiden Formen bis auf etwa 10 gehen, die Anordnung der St. und das
Größenverhältnis zwischen Rst. zu Mst. ist bei beiden Formen dasselbe,
Mst. sind nur einer vorhanden, seltener 2-3. Die St. beider Formen
sind nur unterschieden durch Länge und Dicke; es mag also vielleicht
für beide Formen nur je ein Allel eines einzigen Gen vorliegen, so daß
eine Weiterführung des Namens PERUVIANUS als forma wohl nur aus Tradition
zu rechtfertigen ist, wegen der Zweiteilung der Art durch Br. & R.,
denn solche Erbformen pflegt man an sich nicht taxonomisch zu benennen.
Da eine genaue Bl.-Beschreibung nie erfolgte, gebe ich hier eine
solche von einer Bl. (mit Foto) eines Exemplars östlich von SAMNE, Prov.
OTUSCO, Depart. La Libertad, wo beide Formen mit Übergängen zusammen
wachsen. Bl. seitlich, nicht sehr weit unter dem Triescheitel, ziemlich
waagerecht vom Trieb abstehend, 21 cm lang, mit einer Weite zwischen
den äußersten Krbl. von ca 20 cm. Über dem Frkn. ist die Rö. leicht
nach oben gebogen, während die Öffnung der Rö. wieder leicht nach unten
gebogen ist. Frkn. 22 mm lang und dick, grün, gehöckert, mit schmalen
grünen Schuppen von unten 1 mm bis oben ca 4 mm Länge und mit reichlichen
schwarzbraunen Wollhaaren. N.-K. 23 mm lang, aber nur etwa 5 mm
weit um den Gr., blaß bräunlich, mit etwas Nektar. Rö. darüber 8 cm
lang, Öffnung 4,5 mm weit, mit 6 mm (unten) bis 25 mm (oben) langen
graugrünen Schuppen und schwarzen, 15-25 mm langen Wollbüscheln. Stbf.
blaßgrün, nach den Enden hellgelb, der Rö. aufliegend, 8-10 cm lang,
die des Saumes 4,5 cm lang, Insertionslücke 4 cm lang unter dem Saum,
Beutel brauncreme, 2,5 mm lang, 1 mm breit, Pollen weiß. Gr. blaßgrün,
19,5 cm lang, wovon 3 cm auf die 15 hellgelben, überragenden Narbenlappen
kommen. Innere Krbl. weiß, 9-10 cm lang, 3,5-4 cm breit, bei etwa 2/3 Länge am breitesten, oben gerundet mit aufgesetzter hellgelber
Spitze; äußere Krbl. 8-11 cm lang, 14-18 mm breit, fast von unten
ab zugespitzt, nach unten hellgrün, nach den Enden rotbraun, stark
nach außen gebogen. Einige Samenangaben siehe unter TRICHOCER. KNUTHIANUS.
Nr. FR 567 (Form PACHANOI) und Nr. FR 155 (Form PERUVIANUS).
Abb. 1186.

Trichocereus macrogonus – Echinopsis macrogona

Trichocereus macrogonus – Echinopsis macrogona

Trichocereus macrogonus, also known as Echinopsis macrogona, is a columnar cactus.

The first description about it was made using the name Cereus macrogonus SD. Cact. Hort. Dyck.Cult.

Currently valid name name:

Echinopsis macrogona, the name is disputed by some authors and re-described as Trichocereus macrogonus by others. The whole genus Trichocereus is currently being revised and it´ll take a good 10 years till this is somewhat resolved. Echinopsis macrogona / Trichocereus macrogonus is at least partially synonymous with Echinopsis peruviana / Trichocereus peruvianus and it is difficult to clearly divide them. Both are contending names and due the older age of Trichocereus macrogonus (back then it was still called Cereus macrogonus, which was the name from the first description by Salm-Dyck), it´s possible that Trichocereus macrogonus / Echinopsis macrogona will replace Trichocereus peruvianus / Echinopsis peruviana as main species name for this group of plants.

T.macrogonus and its connection to Trichocereus peruvianus

Trichocereus macrogonus is an alternative name for some forms of Trichocereus peruvianus and many authors support this theory. These days, some Peruvian Trichocereus strains with brown spines and dark blue epidermis are usually sold as  Trichocereus macrogonus by seed sellers, but these plants are not really different enough to justify treating them as correct species.

Kiesling´s article on Cereus macrogonus

Kiesling wrote a very good piece on the species Trichocereus macrogonus and you can read it here:  http://www.cactusconservation.org/CCI/library/pdf/Albesiano_Kiesling_2012_Haseltonia_17_24-34.pdf

Trichocereus macrogonus is a very old name and since Britton and Rose came along with their description of Trichocereus peruvianus, the plants that used to be called Macrogonus were then treated as T. peruvianus. Due to the old age of the species name Trichocereus macrogonus, it is possible that it will be given priority over the newer name T. peruvianus IF the original description of T. macrogonus will be considered to be correct. Right now, this hasn’t been decided yet, but there’s a chance that this will happen.  However, many people want to keep the old name Trichocereus peruvianus just because it has a lot of history and traditions attached to it. The future of Trichocereus macrogonus is unclear and will be decided in the next years. Personally, I consider the name Trichocereus macrogonus to be extremely problematic due to the many problems associated with it, eg no type locality, no flower description, unclear origin, not being found again in nature, etc.

Synonyms of T. macrogonus:

Cereus macrogona, Echinopsis macrogona, Trichocereus macrogona, Trichocereus glaucus (sometimes. Trichocereus glaucus is a species related to T. chalaensis. However, many seed sellers offer certain strains from the T. peruvianus/macrogonus group as Trichocereus glaucus, eg KK336). Echinopsis glauca, Trichocereus glauca, many strains that belong to T. peruvianus.

Below you can find some photos of plants with this name from the commercial market. They differ greatly and not all belong to Trichocereus peruvianus. There are plants with the label Trichocereus macrogonus being sold that belong to T. bridgesii, T. pachanoi, T. peruvianus, T. werdermannianus, T. taquimbalensis, T. tacaquirensis, T. santaensis, T. bridgesii and Trichocereus cuzcoensis. Because of this, it makes no sense to use plants from the commercial market as standard for this species.

If you like this article, check out some of our other articles about the genus Trichocereus. Trichocereus peruvianus, Trichocereus bridgesii or Trichocereus pachanoi.

 

Trichocereus macrogonus - Echinopsis macrogona European Macro clone
European Trichocereus macrogonus clone. Very old clone and one of the oldest ones associated with the name.

Trichocereus macrogonus - Echinopsis macrogona
Different clone that was sold as Trichocereus macrogonus
Trichocereus macrogonus - Echinopsis macrogona 2

European Trichocereus macrogonus clone

Trichocereus macrogonus - Echinopsis macrogonaTrichocereus macrogonus - Echinopsis macrogona 66Trichocereus macrogonus - Echinopsis macrogona 67

The photos below show Trichocereus macrogonus in the Huntington Botanical Gardenechinopsis macrogona trichocereus macrogonus Huntington Botanical Garden HBG

echinopsis macrogona trichocereus macrogonus Huntington Botanical Garden HBG 2Trichocereus macrogonus in the Huntington Botanical Garden by Richard Hipp

Origin of Trichocereus macrogonus:

Unkown. Possibly Bolivia but the species could never be found in Bolivia again. Originally, it was assumed that the plant came from Brasil and Borg wrote that the plant came from Bolivia or Argentinia but that could not be verified. Rauh found a Trichocereus in 1954 (collection number K68-1954) that may have been the wild Trichocereus macrogonus. That plant was found around the Mantaro Area in the middle of Peru.

This is the plant in question, and judging by its looks, it could actually be the originally described Trichocereus macrogonus. Back then, the plant was described as Cereus macrogonus (Salm-Dyk) and I know a very similar plant that was distributed by Karel Knize.

Trichocereus macrogonus Rauh and Backeberg Rio Tambo Echinopsis

And this pic is from Backeberg´s description and shows a plant that is very common in European collections!

trichocereus rauh Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona

Echinopsis macrogona or Trichocereus macrogonus is a columnar cactus that is very close to Trichocereus peruvianus or Echinopsis peruviana. Echinopsis macrogona is most likely synonymous with a certain, long-spined type of Peruvianus. The typical epidermis of  Trichocereus macrogonus has a frosty, blue color. Trichocereus macrogonus grows columnar and can get up to 3 meters tall and 3-5 centimeters in diameter. Some very large species can even reach a higher diameter. It has 6-9 radial thorns and 1-3 middle thorns that are up to 10 centimeters long.

Spines of Echinopsis macrogona:

The spines are dark brown, black or gray in color. New spine growth can also be yellow. The problem is that there are countless types that are called “Trichocereus Macrogonus”. Some definitely belong in the Trichocereus Cuzcoensis complex while some others are a very frosty type of Trichocereus Peruvianus from Matucana.

Areoles:

About 2 centimeters apart from each other and 5-10 mm in diameter. Brown-felted.

Flowers: White, near the  top and up to 18 centimeters long. Trichocereus Macrogonus is a night flowering species.

Fruit: Round fruit, shiny segmented fruit, black or dark brown in color.

Trichocereus Macrogonus is self sterile what means that you need two different species´to get seed.

Culture of Trichocereus macrogonus:

The culture of Trichocereus Macrogonus is very easy. Basically, it has exactly the same requirements as Trichocereus Pachanoi (San Pedro Cactus) or Trichocereus Peruvianus (Peruvian Torch). It is a very hardy plant that forgives a lot and as long as you treat it like a cactus instead of a swamp plant, it will pay you back with healthy growth every year. The cactus only needs water during the hot, growing seasons. That means that in summer, you can water it every week or even days as long you allow the soil to dry up between waterings.

You can improve the drainage o

Providing drainage

f your soil by adding purely mineral substrates like pumice, clay substrates like Seramis or simply sand. However, you should add a very small part commercial cactus soil because you want the substrate to be able to store nutrients and purely mineral substrates like sand tend to wash out nutrients very easily. Trichocereus Macrogonus likes a place with half-shade that gets a fair amount of sunlight every day. However, you should make sure not to burn the hell out of it. You need to adapt your plants slowly to sun light and if necessary you need to provide a shade cloth.

Winter & Frost: Trichocereus Macrogonus is a very hardy cactus that can take short night frosts down to -9° Celsius as long as the general health of the plant is ok. However, it requires a minimum average temperature of 10° celsius. That means it can take short frosts down to 15.8° Fahrenheit as maximum frost temperature. The average minimum temperature in Fahrenheit is 50° Fahrenheit.

Winter storage & Winter Protection:

Trichocereus Macrogonus likes a bright spot with lots of fresh air during the wintertime. If you have the luck to live in a country with very little frost, like Australia or the hotter parts of the USA, you wont have the problem of winter storage because you can grow your plants outside but most people in other parts of the world are not able do that.

Providing fresh air to tackle fungal problems

It´s best to store cacti in a very bright room with fresh air supply to prevent mold. The minimum temperature should be around 9° celsius/50° Fahrenheit. For this type of winter storage, the plants need to be kept dry, without any waterings in between October and April. If you have a greenhouse, you can start taking out the plants by May, but be careful about late night frosts because some south american species that take frost very well. For Trichocereus Macrogonus, this should not be a problem though.

Germination of Trichocereus macrogonus seeds:

The seeds of Trichocereus Macrogonus are like most other Echinopsis & Trichocereus seeds. They need light to germinate and should be sprinkled on top of the soil. They require a minimum germination temperature between 25° and 30° celsius and seedlings need to be watched carefully to prevent heat damage, because though temps up to 30° celsius increase germination rates, everything above can kill the young seedlings in an instant. Watch out for mold or fungus gnats. However, Trichocereus Macrogonus seedlings are actually tough.

Where to get seed: 

There are many seed suppliers that sell seed of Trichocereus macrogonus. However, be cautious because there one or two south american wholesalers that sell over aged seed. Please not that there are some extraordinarily good Seed distributors from South America so there is no general rule of thumb. That´s how life is and I would recommend you to test the seed you are offered before you buy a substantial amount of it. I have seen people tank hundreds of dollars for seed that produced one or two seedlings.

Seed Viability, Trichocereus macrogonus:

The seed is viable for many years. This is something that most Trichocereus have in common and the seed is probably viable for at least 5-10 years, though you get the best results within the first year.

Commercial strains, clones or field numbers associated with the name:

KK923 Trichocereus Macrogonus (Cieneguillas, Bolivia), KK1422 (Villa Abecia, Bolivia), KK2151 (Ayacucho, Peru), KK2175 Apurimac Pachachaca (Bolivia), KK2176 Ayacucho, Tr. macrogonus H1306 from the Huntington Botanical Garden, Trichocereus cv. Neon Palm, Trichocereus sp. Luther Burbank, Trichocereus SS01, Trichocereus cv. Oklahoma, and many more. List will be updated. If you know some more, let me know. But the fact that you could as well list all of those as Trichocereus Peruvianus makes this kinda pointless. Both types are synonymous and I just added this page because I dont want to leave it out.

Trichocereus macrogonus for sale

Trichocereus macrogonus is rarely available for sale. The species name is very old and the plants on the commercial market that you get with this label belong to all kinds of species. Most Trichocereus macrogonus for sale are Knize sourced Trichocereus werdermannianus, Trichocereus peruvianus, Trichocereus bridgesii etc.

Trichocereus macrogonus seeds

Like mentioned before, you can get Trichocereus macrogonus seeds from the commercial market. Since it is not known how the original Cereus macrogonus looked like, you can get all kinds of plants under this name. Trichocereus macrogonus and Trichocereus peruvianus are at least partially synonymous and sellers use both names interchangeably.

 

This here is what grows out of Köhres Trichocereus Macrogonus Seed:

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis Knize Köhres

Trichocereus macrogonus ‘Fields’

The Fields Macrogonus is an old Australian Trichocereus macrogonus clone that came to Australia through Blossfeld´s first South America expedition. Harry Blossfeld was a cactus collector that financed his expeditions by selling cacti to financiers, and that´s how it probably was with the Fields Macro.

trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona flower

trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona flower 2

trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona flower 3

 

Photo Trichocereus macrogonus European Macrogonus clone

European Macrogonus Clone

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona Glaucus

Different phenotype, associated with Trichocereus macrogonus.

Echinopsis macrogona Trichocereus macrogonus photo 99
Red or brown spines are an important way to differentiate between them.

Photo Trichocereus macrogonus European Macrogonus clone 4Photo Trichocereus macrogonus European Macrogonus clone 5Macrogonus Trichocereus photo Aerial roots of Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona
Aerial roots of Trichocereus macrogonus

Trichocereus macrogonus Knize Cieneguillas

Good example of a Bolivian Trichocereus macrogonus sourced from Karel Knize. The plant is almost certainly a relative of Trichocereus werdermannianus or taquimbalensis.

Trichocereus macrogonus photo Australian garden

Trichocereus macrogonus for sale.

Trichocereus macrogonus Echinopsis macrogona MG Red Spine Peruvianus

Trichocereus macrogonus / Echinopsis macrogona ‘MG Red Spine’ (Rodni Kisar)

 

 

Trichocereus macrogonus hybrid Amun-Re with red flower

Trichocereus Macro hybrid Amun-Re with red flower

Macrogonus European clone Trichocereus Echinopsis macrogona

European Macro clone

Wild populations from Matucana that may or may not count as Echinopsis macrogona.

Trichocereus macrogonus Collana Roja Peru Echinopsis macrogona

Trichocereus macrogonus Collana Roja Peru Echinopsis macrogona 2

Trichocereus macrogonus Collana Roja Peru Echinopsis macrogona 3

Trichocereus macrogonus Collana Pichu Peru Echinopsis macrogona

Trichocereus macrogonus Collana Pichu Peru Echinopsis macrogona 2

Trichocereus macrogonus pomolargo Peru Echinopsis macrogonaEchinopsis macrogona Peru photos TrichocereusEchinopsis macrogona Peru photos Trichocereus 2

Echinopsis macrogona Peru photos Trichocereus 3

Echinopsis macrogona Peru photos Trichocereus 4

Echinopsis macrogona Peru photos Trichocereus 5

Echinopsis macrogona Peru photos Trichocereus 6

Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana: Huariquiña

Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana: Huariquiña

Trichocereus peruvianus from Huariquiña!

Hey guys, just wanted to give you a preview of the upcoming Trichocereus Matucana strains.

Huariquiña, not far away from Matucana. There are also some photos from that site from the Sacred Succulents Field Trip. Overall, this is a fantastic strain with beautiful plants that grow prostrate at times. 100% authentic and genuine Trichocereus peruvianus. Available soon. If you want to be notified about it just subscribe to the newsletter at trichocereus.net/newsletter and you get a message when they become available.

Trichocereus ‘Rosei 2’ Echinopsis

Trichocereus ‘Rosei 2’ Echinopsis

The Trichocereus peruvianus clones Rosei 1 & Rosei 2 are among the most interesting Trichocereus cultivars out there. Both are very glaucous with a dark blue skin. They have yellow or dark brown spines that often have black tips. The old spine growth looks very gray and the areoles are covered with very fine, white wool.

Trichocereus ‘Rosei 2’ was part of the legendary Australian Fields collection. Both Trichocereus rosei clones were brought to Australia by Harry Blossfeld, who was one of the first importers of cacti.  . Prier donated some pics of the original mother plant at Fields and I am extremely glad we have them on the site.

“Rosei 2” is certainly not a real species name and belongs into the context of Trichocereus peruvianus / Echinopsis peruviana. It is very similar to the dark blue Trichocereus peruvianus plants coming from Matucana and it´s possible that it was originally collected there. Either as seeds or as a live cutting. The spine color can be very variable and this clone is known to produce massive spines, which can be seen on some of the photos.

If you want to see more photos of Rosei 1 and Rosei 2, check out our Facebook Trichocereus group: https://facebook.com/groups/trichocereus 

T. peruvianus 'Rosei 2' At Fields

T. peruvianus 'Rosei 2'

t peru roseii 2

T.peru Roseii2 flower

T.peru Roseii2_1

T.peru Roseii2_3

T.peru Roseii2_4

T.peru Roseii2_1

Trichocereus hybrids (Echinopsis)

Trichocereus hybrids (Echinopsis)

There are all kinds of Trichocereus hybrids out there and I am happy to show you a couple of the resulting crosses on this page. I will try to update this page as often as I can, to show you what others grew from a certain cross.

Now let me add a little bit of background info to give you an understanding how this breeding works in case you are completely new to this. Almost all Trichocereus species are self-sterile. That means that you need pollen from another plant to produce seed. The pollen donor needs to be genetically different from the receiver. Because of that, it´s not possible to cross two different cuttings from the same mother plant. If you list the parents of a cross, it looks something like this:
Trichocereus peruvianus x Trichocereus bridgesii
That simply means that the Peruvianus is the mother plant, while Trichocereus bridgesii is the Father. In most cases, the resulting offspring comes closer to the mother than to the father. However, there are a lot of exceptions to this and sometimes, the genes of the father are simply more dominant.
You can cross a whole lot of Trichos with each other and most of the crosses will work, if you did it right. But there are some crosses that just genetically don´t match. For example, the seedlings produced by that cross end up being variegated/albinos or simply die. That´s actually very common and can happen all the time. It happens the most when crossing plants like Hildewintera hybrids. And that´s probably because there werent many plants in the gene pool to begin with.

Most Trichocereus species have a white flower and apart from the extremely rare Trichocereus tulhuayacensis, all San Pedros are flowering white. Because of that, this community is trying to breed some San Pedros with colored flowers. There already are a handful of hybrids involving Echinopsis pachanoi with colored flowers. One such Trichocereus hybrid is called SAARWELLEN and the other one is AMUN-RE. But both Trichocereus hybrids are extremely rare.

Now, have a look at some of the photos of Trichocereus hybrids

Trichocereus validus Hybrid

Terscheckii hybrid (1)

Terscheckii hybrid (2)

Terscheckii hybrid (3)

 

Trichocereus terscheckii x  Trichocereus bridgesii ‘Psycho0’

Terscheckii x Psycho San Pedro hybrids

Terscheckii x psycho (2)

 

Echinopsis terscheckii x Echinopsis pachanoi

Terscheckii x Pach (4)

Terscheckii x Pach (3)

Terscheckii x Pach (2)

Terscheckii x Pach (1)

 

 Trichocereus bridgesii ‘SS02’ x ‘Tom Juul´s Giant’

SS02 x Trichocereus bridgesii

SS02 x Bridgessi

SS02 x Bridgesii

 

Echinopsis peruviana ‘Sausage Plant’ x Trichocereus scopulicola

Sausage x Scop

Echinopsis peruviana ‘ROSEI 1’ x OPEN

 

 

Pachanoi x SS02

 

Echinopsis pachanoi x J3

Echinopsis scopulicola ‘Super Pedro’ x J3

Trichocereus scopulicola ‘Super Pedro’ x  Trichocereus bridgesii ‘HB02’

Fields  x Rosei #1

 

Trichocereus bridgesii ‘SS02’ x Sierra Canyon

Trichocereus bridgesii SS02 x Trichocereus chiloensis

 

Psycho0 x Scopulicola

Luther Burbank x SS02

Sierra Blue x SS02

 

Echinopsis macrogona x Echinopsis scopulicola

Psycho0 x J2

Psycho0 x Open ‘Vishnu’

 

 

KK242 – Trichocereus cuzcoensis & more!

KK242 – Trichocereus cuzcoensis & more!

KK242 Trichocereus cuzcoensis is a collection number by the Peruvian seed & cactus seller Karel Knize. He is know for his many Trichocereus species and KK242 was one of them. But it´s not actually a species because we grew all kinds of different species from those KK242 seeds. Most were Trichocereus cuzcoensis, but that´s definitely not the complete story.

Most of the plants labeled as KK242 are representative for a very typical Trichocereus cuzcoensis. However, the KK242 is simply a collection name that stands for the area where the plants come from. And within that area, there are all kinds of different populations and all were sold using the same name. Imagine you live in a town and every plant is given the same collection name. That is what´s actually going on with KK242. Like already mentioned, the largest part of the plants labeled KK242 are Trichocereus cuzoensis. That is also because the name became the archetype of a typical Cuzcoensis and there are many people that label every one of their cuzcoensis plants “KK242”.And that´s neither correct nor practicable.

Now, most of the KK242s on the market were distributed by Knize´s website. If I remember correctly, none of the KK242 sold was actually labeled as Trichocereus cuzcoensis.

Those are the KK242 collections that I know of:

KK242 Trichocereus peruvianus – Matucana (frosted stem, brown spines)
KK242 Trichocereus peruvianus – Rio Chillon (from central Peru)
KK242 Trichocereus peruvianus – form. Langa
KK242 Trichocereus peruvianus – Rio Lurin (please note that the Lurin Trichocereus is actually a peruvianus, despite it being labeled as KK242!)
KK242 Trichocereus peruvianus – Huancavelica (which probably is a Peruvianus too)

Please note that apart from those different collection sites, there were cuttings and seeds from all kinds of mother plants sold and distributed throughout the world. That means that seed labeled as Kk242 can produce all kinds of plants, not just the KK242 Cuzcoensis.

Where to buy seeds and plants of KK242? : Well, if you are looking for a KK242, it is your lucky day. And that is because they are everywhere. On Ebay, a large part of the Trichocereus species sold are actually KK242s. Nonetheless, there also are other cuzcoensis varieties that you can encounter and many of them might even be labeled KK242, though they actually are a different cuzcoensis type from another location. And that´s why the bad image that the species Trichocereus cuzcoensis, or the KK242 in particular, receives is not justified. They are wonderful and amazing specimens and have such a great diversity that it´s totally not fair to reduce KK242 to that well know cuzcoensis type from Matucana. Some seed sellers might even have some KK242 in stock (and potentially labeled as Trichocereus peruvianus) though they are not aware of it. Most seed collectors or seed producers just label them “Trichocereus peruvianus” and since they don´t have the space or the funds to grow them all before they offer the seed, they don´t or simply can´t test it. Many people that sell cactus seed are still poor and they neither have the funds to grow them nor the knowledge to ID them. Of course, there are very skilled Taxonomists and Botanists from countries like Peru, Argentina or Bolivia. But there also are many people selling seeds or cuttings that are not.
Mislabeled seed is a problem that almost every seed salesman has to face from time to time and I know of a couple of cases in which large shop owners stopped doing business with certain collectors/wholesalers who sell mislabeled seeds that brought them into trouble with their customers. I recently came across someone who was pretty pissed for receiving a KK242 instead of the Tr. Peruvianus that he ordered. And with a good reason. But I guess it comes with the job that stuff like this happens from time to time. And if I were in the position of someone who ended up getting a cuzcoensis instead of a peruvianus, I´d just message the seller and explain the problem. You know, there are so many different types, varieties, and even intermediates, that it´s sometimes impossible to draw the line somewhere. Again, Trichocereus cuzcoensis is SO MUCH MORE than just KK242. And there are countless peruvianus types that are somehow related to cuzcoensis and show or two traits that are typical for cuzcoensis too.
Most wholesale seed collectors label their plant “Trichocereus Peruvianus” and keeping in mind the current taxonomy (which tends to merge the plants into a bigger species), it might even be the correct taxonomical label. Personally, I think a shop owner should add as much information about the background of a plant that he has, in order to give the customer a vague idea of what he can expect to grow. But since that´s not always possible (due to collectors just not labeling plants right) it´s the stuff that will always happen. And usually, that´s not because the seller is greedy SOB who wants to rip-off his customers, but because there aren’t so many people around who can keep peruvianus and cuzcoensis apart. Those collectors rarely are skilled with ID and though they sometimes know how the type they collect seed of is called by the locals, it´s far from being reliable. There are cuzcoensis forms available from Peru that come labeled as Trichocereus macrogonus or Trichocereus peruvianus. Because that´s how the other collectors labeled them. And chances are that other collectors will use the same name in the future, whenever they collect seed of that plant.

It´s not hard to recognize the KK242 cuzcoensis, but as I already said…where to draw the line? There are so many intermediatory forms that it´s kinda pointless because you´ll end up calling some perfectly peruvianoid types a Trichocereus cuzcoensis, just based on the fact that it has a couple characteristics that also exist on a cuzco.
Most of the people who offer “cuzcoensis” labeled as “peruvianus” probably weren’t even aware of the fact that their plants are more on the cuzco end of the spectrum. And since modern taxonomy went on to merge a lot of those species into the larger ones like “peruvianus” and “pachanoi”, this might happen a lot more in the future. And when dealing with seed collectors that visit local populations in Peru, Bolivia or anywhere else in the world…it´s rare that they include the collection sites with their seed or even add pics. I know many wholesalers, who have to grow their seed just to know what type they have bought. And if you keep in mind that some of those plants will take 3-5 years until they are big  enough to say anything about the local population, it get´s obvious that the remaining seed would have already become unviable in the meantime. And that is a problem that will never really go away. Of course, it´s actually a pretty bad situation but the short lifespan of some seeds is the reason why there are so many shaky ID´s when buying seed from Peru; or other areas where cacti are grown as commercial crops. But despite the fact that it can be frustrating to find out that you ended up buying mislabeled seed…I still prefer it to getting unviable seed.  Because thats the only thing worse than getting mislabeled seed.

So yeah, always ask where the seed is coming from. And ask about how fresh it is too! An honest seed supplier is EXTREMELY important because when growing plants from seed, a lot of this is based on trust. From all the cactus seed, I bought in my lifetime, at least 1/3 was unviable or misidentified. And as a buyer, that´s something that you can´t prevent. Some crosses just are bad or are a genetic mismatch. Or, some seeds are just too old.
So yeah, if there are issues with seeds contact your seed supplier and tell them/ask for a replacement. Not only can you help to weed out unreliable suppliers but you give the store owner a fair and honest feedback.  KK242 Trichocereus cuzcoensis is a type that is notorious for having a whole lot of bad seed available on the market. I honestly only heard about one or two people who successfully raised some of them from seed. One of them is the SAB store by the way. Apart from the two I just mentioned, I only heard of unviable KK242 seed. That doesn’t mean that there is/was no good KK242 Trichocereus cuzcoensis on the market…but please be careful when buying this type of seed because a lot of it is, well let´s call it “difficult”.

I have many pics on this website and most of them include data about where the plants are growing. It´s not always possible to guess how a seedling might look like in the future, but the collection site is a good starting point.
If you have pics of different KK242s, please let me know our Trichocereus Facebook group and I´ll add them to the site.

KK242 Trichocereus cuzcoensis Master EvanPic: Master Evan

Trichocereus KK242 Matucana _K39_5_jpgKK242 Matucana – Copyright Trout

Trichocereus KK242 Matucana K39_4_jpgKK242 Matucana, Copyright Trout

Trichocereus KK242 Matucana K39_3_jpg

KK242_E19_8_jpg

Another type that Knize sold as KK242. Please note that this plant looks nothing like the KK242 Cuzcoensis. It´s possible that it is related to the more Cuzcoensis type KK242, but it´s a great reminder that KK242 is nothing but a “location” and not, the plant!

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T_peruvianus_KK242_JLH_TroutThe plant above is what was grown from KK242 Seeds from JLH.

T_peruvianus_KK242_JLH_via_SS_Trout

 Copyright: K.Trout

KK242 – Rio Lurin or Lurin Valle

This Form is a Plant that is very different from the KK242 Cuzcoensis that became so common around the World. It´s more of a standard Trichocereus Peruvianus and looks absolutely stunning as an Adult Plant! Great Type!

TRICHOCEREUS KK242 Bridgesii

So this Peruvianus was grown from a KK242 Seed Bag. It is obviously not the typical Cuzcoensis Type Tricho so i found it noteworthy to add this plant.

Trichocereus KK242 Matucana

Trichocereus KK242 – Langa

Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana

Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana

Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana is one of the most sought after types. Matucana is the type locality of Trichocereus peruvianus, which means that in Matucana you can find the most typical plants according to the description. The description was originally made by the Americans Britton & Rose, and the described a plant that must have been somewhere between Trichocereus peruvianus and Trichocereus cuzcoensis. And yes, Trichocereus cuzcoensis plays a part in the history of Trichocereus peruvianus as well. Both are so closely related and exist with many intermediate forms in between that Britton & Rose´s decision to keep them separated from each other was not regarded without criticism.

One of the most typical Matucana Peruvianus types is the ICARO DNA Peruvianus. Icaro Dna made a name for themselves providing great quality seeds that are probably as true as it gets to the original description. To me, when I hear the name MATUCANA, I think of this remarkable type.
ICARO DNA Rod 2Photo: Trichocereus.com.au

Some more Matucana Peruvianus types are the LOS GENTILES Peruvanus from Sacred Succulents and my own Matucana Peruvianus in my shop! Sorry for the promo, but it´s super high quality seeds that you will love!
But now back to the Matucana Perus. Sacred Succulents had the great luck to visit some of them during their South America Field Trips. Here are some of them:

291 BK08612

Trichocereus peruvianus, Matucana, Peru

Trichocereus Peruvianus without a field number. Again in Matucana Peru. Very cool Glauceous Tricho, similar to the cultivar Trichocereus Rosei or Trichocereus Glaucus. Pic: Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com! Please support them because they are awesome!

296 Trichocereus peruvianus, Matucana, Peru

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BK08612.4-A Trichocereus peruvianus, Matucana, Peru

Another frosted Peruvianus from the Location in Matucana. Very similar to the Plants that are labeled “Trichocereus Rosei”. Or Trichocerus Glaucus! Pic: Ben Kamm, Sacredsucculents.com!

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Another type that is believed to be a Matucana type is the Australian Trichocereus rosei clone. It´s fabulous and one of my absolute favorites. Rosei 2 is DEFINITELY a Matucana…and Rosei 1 most likely. The alternative would be that it comes from Rimac, but I want to show it here too!

T.peru Roseii1 Flower_1

This is Rosei 2, just for comparisons:

T.peru Roseii2_1

Some of those plants are sometimes called Trichocereus santaensis, but those are usually thinner and overall closer to Trichocereus pachanoi or sometimes even Trichocereus bridgesii than they are to Trichocereus peruvianus.

Well, that was one of the more typical Trichocereus peruvianus from Matucana. This city in Peru is one of the historic cactus sites, especially for the species Trichocereus peruvianus. Matucana is the type locality of Trichocereus peruvianus, which means that in Matucana you can find the most typical plants. But there is more; many many plants with cuzcoensis genetics. For example, KK242 is from Matucana too! And due to the high number of intermediates between Trichocereus cuzcoensis and Trichocereus peruvianus, it´s sometimes not easy to draw a firm line between them.

T_peruvianus_KK242_JLH_via_SS_Trout
This photo shows a fairly typical KK242 from Matucana. The photo comes from K.Trout and his website troutsnotes.com.

And now compare this to this other plant from Matucana:

Trichocereus KK242 Matucana K39_3_jpg

It´s funny…but that one was sold as KK242 from Matucana too. Just to give you an understanding of what is actually out there.

SS01 (Trichocereus peruvianus)

SS01 (Trichocereus peruvianus)

The SS01 clone was brought into cultivation by Sacred Succulents. It is one of their oldest clones, going back many years and the number of hybrids that involves it is really high. It actually is a very blue Trichocereus that would usually be called Tr. peruvianus or Tr. macrogonus outside the SS nursery. The origin of this plant is unknown, but because of Sacred Succulent´s constant work with this clone, it is widely distributed.

Here is an excerpt from the Sacred Succulents description of SS01:

SS01 (Trichocereus peruvianus or Trichocereus macrogonus)

Columnar cactus up to 8´+ tall. Fat blue-green stems up to 6″ in diameter and 2″+ spines. Huge white nocturnal flowers. Can grow very fast; up to several feet a year. Tends to grow prostrate with age. We believe this to be a clone of either Trichocereus macrogonus or Trichocereus peruvianus. Cold hardy to 25° Fahrenheit. 

My personal impression of this plant is that it is one of the plants that were originally sold by Karel Knize. Those were really common at the time this clone showed up and I would not be surprised if it was one of them.

Sacred Succulents used this clone to create many hybrids, such as SS01 x Tr. pachanoi, SS01 x BBG, SS01 x Tom Juul´s Giant, SS01 x SS02 and many more. If you want to buy some seeds or cuttings of Trichocereus SS01, check out the Sacred Succulents website.
Those photos show the SS01 clone and are not hybrids. I will have a huge number of SS01 hybrid pics in my upcoming book SAN PEDRO HYBRIDS, which will be out in 2017.

SS01 NR (3)Trichocereus peruvianus SS01 / Photos: Noah Reams

SS01 NR 3

SS01 NR

 

Sharxx Blue (Trichocereus peruvianus)

Sharxx Blue (Trichocereus peruvianus)

The Peruvianus clone SHARXX BLUE is a shortspined Peruvianus clone that was named after the SAB Member Sharxx. It originated from the well known DAWSONS cactus collection and was brought and named by the SAB member PD.
It probably is some kind of Matucana Peruvianus, much like the ICARO DNA type, the Los Gentiles or the Matucana Peruvianus that I have in stock here.

The plants are extremely blue and glaucous. Overall, this type of Trichocereus is one of my all-time favorite plants and it´s a very popular clone among Trichocereus breeders.
There definitely are plants that are similar and which are not genetically identical. Like I said before, there is a large number of various collection sites in Matucana and most of them are similar to the SHARXX BLUE.

This clone is sometimes available from Australian growers that gift or trade away cuttings every now and then. If you are interested in a SHARXX BLUE cutting, you might try to make a posting at the SAB forum. There also are growers that use it to produce Trichocereus hybrids. This year was the first year that Misplant offered some crosses that involved the SHARXX BLUE clone. It is also available from Trichocereus.com.au, who donated the pics below. 31

T.peruvianus 'Sharxx blue' 2

Photos: Trichocereus.com.au 

T. peruvianus 'Sharxx blue' 1

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