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Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas / Echinopsis cephalomcacrostibas Weberbauerocereus

Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas / Echinopsis cephalomcacrostibas Weberbauerocereus

Trichocereus cephalomcarostibas, also known as Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas, is a columnar cactus that was described as a Trichocereus species by Curt Backeberg and Werner Rauh. However, the plant in question later turned out as a Weberbauerocereus and the flower makes it pretty obvious that Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas is not a Trichocereus.

The currently valid name of this species is Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas, but most authors went on to treat it as an incorrect species or move it to Weberbauerocereus as Weberbauerocereus cephalomacrostibas.

The original description of Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas

The original description was published by Backeberg and Werdermann in the book NEUE KAKTEEN, which is German for NEW CACTI. The book was released in 1931. The original description described a plant that was then called cereus cephalomacrostibas. Most plants that are now part of the genus Trichocereus were treated as Cereus at the time, which is why the name wasn’t surprising.

Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas, also known as Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas, gets 1,5 – 2 meters tall and pups have a maximum diameter of 8-12 centimeters. The areoles are very close to each other, which is even more obvious on older plants later on. The areoles are between 1-2 centimeters in diameter and the plant is very spiny. It has up to 20 small radial spines and between 1-3 middle spines that can be up to 14 centimeters long. The spines are dark brown to red brown (old growth gray). It´s noteworthy that the original flower from the Backeberg description only had a size of 12 cm (which would fit here), but was said to have scales on the flower. Besides, it was supposed to be white instead of this cream or beige color.

Origin: South peru, near Mollendo.

Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas Weberbauerocereus 2

Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas Weberbauerocereus 3Pics in this Post courtesy of: htpp://troutsnotes.com

Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas Weberbauerocereus 4Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas Weberbauerocereusdermann´s CEREUS CEPHALOMACROSTIBAS.

Please note that there also is a plant called KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas that has nothing to do with this plant anmd, that probably grew on the same site  and was confused with a Trichocereus.

KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas cv. Rio Tambo

This field collected Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas / Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas is fairly interesting though it probably has nothing in common with the species that it is supposed to be part of. Knize collected this nice strain near the Rio Tambo in Peru. It almost looks like a spiny Trichocereus pachanoi strain and should definitely be investigated some more. 

KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas cv. Rio Tambo Echinopsis

KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas cv. Rio Tambo Echinopsis 2

KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas cv. Rio Tambo Echinopsis 3

KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas cv. Rio Tambo Echinopsis4

KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas cv. Rio Tambo Echinopsis 5

KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas cv. Rio Tambo Echinopsis 6

KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas cv. Rio Tambo Echinopsis 8

All those photos are courtesy of Troutsnotes.com

If you compare those two plants to the plant that was originally described as Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas, it gets obvious that they are all different plants. The plant in the link was actually a Weberbauerocereus. The seed and the flower are so unlike the ones on any other Trichocereus that it´s absolutely obvious that it’s not a Trichocereus.  But that’s a different story. The original Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas (you know, the one from the link, which actually is a Weberbauerocereus) is said to grow east of Mollendo in the Department Arequipa and occurs from Chala to the Rio Tambo in the south. And that’s where KK1421 is said to originate from. Rio Tambo.

Case of mistaken identity ?

Just because there are Trichos near the Rio Tambo, it does not make em automatically the same population of this Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas from the description. That´s not Ill will but just the flaws of this particular labeling system. It´s  just natural that you can sometimes find a couple of different plants growing at the same area. And because of that, seed collectors should give every single collection (instead of just the whole collection site) a unique number, so you can easier track them down and see which ones would fit in the descriptions and which ones don´t.

Alright, what does that say about those two different plants labeled as KK1421. Well, very little. Both are interesting Trichocereus and while one of them is definitely a cuzcoensis relative, the other one needs further investigation.

Another KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas

The original description goes like this:

Cereus cephalomacrostibas grows in packed groups of columnar cacti that get up to 2 meters tall. They are up to 10 cm thick, a gray-green color, tightly packed areoles, 3 – 6 radial spines and 3 middle spines. The flower is 12 cm long (which is too small for a Trichocereus flower), white, covered with white wool and scales. This original plant occurs in South Peru, above Mollendo.

Now back to KK1421: The Seeds came from Karel Knize and were originally collected from Matarani, Peru at 300m altitude. Knize´s plant obviously comes from the group around Tr. cuzcoensis but it´s difficult to know if this is actually the same plant as Backeberg described as I lack a pic of the flower. What I can say is that 12 cm would be very small of a Trichocereus flower. And there are pics showing a type of Weberbauerocereus, which most believe is THE original Tr. cephalomacrostibas. Mr. Knize´s plant is 100% sure NOT a weberbauerocereus.

Where to buy seeds of KK1421: I actually have some in my shop every now and then. Check it out here: trichocereus.net/shop . This article is an excerpt from my book KAREL KNIZE TRICHOCEREUS FIELD GUIDE.

Pictures provided from Troutsnotes.com!

Another KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas

Another KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas 3

Another KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas 3

Another KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas 4

Another KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas5

Another KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas 5

Another KK1421 Trichocereus cephalomacrostibas Echinopsis cephalomacrostibas 8

If you digg the things we do, please consider supporting us. We have an amazing Trichocereus Facebook group, and  you can also find us on sites like Reddit or Instagram.

Also have a look at some of the other articles in our Trichocereus database. For example Trichocereus PC or Trichocereus macrogonus.

 

 

Trichocereus Lookalikes

Trichocereus Lookalikes

There are various columnar cacti that you can encounter. And though many look very much like Trichocereus on the first look, many of them actually aren´t. This page is about the many lookalikes that are available on the open market. Some of them are labeled “Trichocereus” and some of them aren´t. It includes many plants that were originally collected by seed collectors and field botanists who made a description without having seen the flowers. Because despite the fact that many columnar cacti can be very similar to Trichocereus in their looks, the flowers are what´s usually the biggest help to find out more about the origin of a plant.

Soehrensia

Soehrensias are very similar to Trichocereus. However, most of them stay small, have way too many ribs or a different flower. In addition to that, some of them (like Soehrensia formosa) are very broad and thick. Soehrensias were integrated into the genus Echinopsis, until DNA testing revealed that they are very different in regards to their genetic profile. Because of that, they are regarded a real genus again.

I have no idea which soehrensia this is but it´s definitely not a Trichocereus and Soehrensia comes closest.

HPIM2285

HPIM2283

GYMNANTHOCEREUS CHLOROCARUS

This genus is not really a genus anymore and those plants were moved into the genus Browningia. The current name of the species shown is Browningia chlorocarpa. Other former Gymnanthocerei are now called Browningia altissima (Gymnanthocereus altissimus), Browningia Pilleifera (Gymnanthocereus pilleifer). There always was taxonomic chaos surrounding those plants and very few pictures exist. The flowers are usually a lot smaller than the ones on Trichocereus and vary in many more aspects.

Origin: Huancabamba and Abra Porculla. Ritters collection Number was FR 290. This species was also called Seticereus Chlorocarpus. If you have pics of any former Gymnanthocereus species, please let me know because I´d love to have more of them on the site.

Rauhocereus

This genus is extremely interesting and I am constantly looking for new pics or seeds of Rauhocereus species. The most popular one is Rauhocereus Riosanijiensis. There are´t many sources where you can buy seeds or plants. The breeder misplant sold a couple seedgrown Rauhocereus last year but I am not sure if he will get some more.

-Rauhocereus_riosaniensis Michael Wolf

Rauhocereus Riosaniensis – Picture: Michael Wolf

Peter A Mansfeld Rauhocereus_riosaniensis_pm

Rauhocereus Riosaniensis – Peter A. MansfeldBrowningia_riosaniensis_-_DaderotRauhocereus Riosanienjis Palmengarten Frankfurt – Daderot

I will also add pics and descriptions of Azureocereus. Erdisia, Weberbauerocereus, Coryocactus, Lobivias Echinopsis and many more. If you have pics of a plant that would fit on this page, please write me on the Trichocereus Facebook group. I will constantly update this page.

Trichocereus Crassiarboreus (NN)

Trichocereus Crassiarboreus (NN)

Trichocereus Crassiarboreus is a plant that was discovered by Friedrich Ritter in 1957. When he found flowering specimens in 1964, he moved the species to Weberbauerocereus. I am not a specialist on Weberbauerocereus but I trust Ritters Experience on that ID. The species was later publicized by Karel Knize under the name Weberbauerocereus Crassiarboreus but his description lacked substantial information and if he wouldnt have mentioned the typus location, there wouldnt have been a chance to find that species again. Besides, Knize added no pics, what makes it even more problematic. Ritter wrote numerous interesting pieces on this plant, including a complete description. Nonetheless, it seems that Knize´s descripion was accepted. Because of that, Trichocereus Crassiaboreus is now called Weberbauerocereus Cuzcoensis. That also explains why Trichocereus Crassiarboreus isnt offered in most commercial seed and plant lists. If you are lucky, you might be able to get some labeled as Weberbauerocereus Cuzcoensis though.

Buy seed or plants of Trichocereus Crassiarboreus: The seed seller köhres still has some seeds of Trichocereus Crassiarboreus/Weberbauerocereus Cuzcoensis in stock. I have no idea about the viability but when I ordered some around 4 years ago, they were still viable and looked very much like what is shown on those pics from K.Trout! They are amazing plants and everyone should consider himself lucky to grow them. I might also add a flower description and a general description of this plant in the near future. But because it is not a real Trichocereus, I will push that back until I am done with the rest of the site!